bewitch vs glamour what difference

what is difference between bewitch and glamour

English

Etymology

From Middle English bewicchen, bewycchen, biwicchen, equivalent to be- +‎ witch.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bəˈwɪtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪtʃ

Verb

bewitch (third-person singular simple present bewitches, present participle bewitching, simple past and past participle bewitched)

  1. (transitive) To cast a spell upon.
  2. (transitive) To fascinate or charm.
    Synonym: forspeak (obsolete)
  3. (transitive) To astonish, amaze. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Derived terms

Translations



English

Etymology

Some say from Scots glamer, supposedly from earlier Scots gramarye (magic, enchantment, spell).

The Scottish term may either be from Ancient Greek γραμμάριον (grammárion, gram), the weight unit of ingredients used to make magic potions, or an alteration of the English word grammar (any sort of scholarship, especially occult learning).

A connection has also been suggested with Old Norse glámr (poet. “moon,” name of a ghost) and glámsýni (glamour, illusion, literally glam-sight). From Grettir’s Saga aka Grettis Saga, one of the Sagas of Icelanders, after the hero has been cursed by Glam, aka Glamr:

“…he was become so fearsome a man in the dark, that he durst go nowhither alone after nightfall, for then he seemed to see all kinds of horrors.

And that has fallen since into a proverb, that Glam lends eyes, or gives Glamsight to those who see things nowise as they are.”

Glamsight (glámsýni) is also referred to in the Icelandic collection Sturlunga saga.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɡlæmə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡlæmɚ/

Noun

glamour (countable and uncountable, plural glamours)

  1. (uncountable) Originally, enchantment; magic charm; especially, the effect of a spell that causes one to see objects in a form that differs from reality, typically to make filthy, ugly, or repulsive things seems beauteous.
    • 1882, James Thomson (B. V.), “The City of Dreadful Night”:
      They often murmur to themselves, they speak
      To one another seldom, for their woe
      Broods maddening inwardly and scorns to wreak
      Itself abroad; and if at whiles it grow
      To frenzy which must rave, none heeds the clamour,
      Unless there waits some victim of like glamour,
      To rave in turn, who lends attentive show.
  2. (uncountable) Alluring beauty or charm (often with sex appeal).
    glamour magazines; a glamour model
  3. (uncountable) Any excitement, appeal, or attractiveness associated with a person, place, or thing; that which makes something appealing.
    The idea of being a movie star has lost its glamour for me.
  4. Any artificial interest in, or association with, an object, or person, through which it or they appear delusively magnified or glorified.
  5. A kind of haze in the air, causing things to appear different from what they really are.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  6. (countable) An item, motif, person, image that by association improves appearance.

Alternative forms

  • glamor (US); however, the -our spelling is the more common spelling, even in the US

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

glamour (third-person singular simple present glamours, present participle glamouring, simple past and past participle glamoured)

  1. (transitive) To enchant; to bewitch.

References

  • “Glámr” in: Richard Cleasby, Guðbrandur Vigfússon — An Icelandic-English Dictionary (1874)

Danish

Etymology

From English glamour.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlamuːr/, [ɡ̊laˈmuːɐ̯] or IPA(key): /ɡlamɔr/, [ˈɡ̊lamɒ]

Noun

glamour c (singular definite glamouren, not used in plural form)

  1. glamour

Derived terms

  • glamourisere
  • glamourøs

Finnish

Noun

glamour

  1. glamour (charm)

Declension


French

Noun

glamour m (uncountable)

  1. glamour

Adjective

glamour (invariable)

  1. glamorous

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English glamour

Noun

glamour m (definite singular glamouren)

  1. glamour

Related terms

  • glamorøs

References

  • “glamour” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English glamour

Noun

glamour m (definite singular glamouren)

  1. glamour

Related terms

  • glamorøs

References

  • “glamour” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Spanish

Etymology

From English glamour.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlaˈmuɾ/, [ɡlaˈmuɾ]

Noun

glamour m (uncountable)

  1. Alternative spelling of glamur

Further reading

  • “glamour” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Noun

glamour c (definite singular glamouren) (uncountable)

  1. glamour

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