bicker vs fuss what difference

what is difference between bicker and fuss

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɪkə/
    Rhymes: -ɪkə(r)

Etymology 1

From Middle English bikeren (to attack), from Middle Dutch bicken (to stab, thrust, attack) +‎ -er (frequentative suffix), from Proto-Germanic *bikjaną (compare Old English becca (pickax), Dutch bikken (to hack), German picken (to peck, pick at), Old Norse bikkja (to plunge into water)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeg- (to smash, break). Compare also German Low German bickern (to nibble, gnaw).

Verb

bicker (third-person singular simple present bickers, present participle bickering, simple past and past participle bickered)

  1. To quarrel in a tiresome, insulting manner.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, Of Industry in our particular Calling, as Scholars (sermon)
      petty things about which men cark and bicker
  2. To brawl or move tremulously, quiver, shimmer (of a water stream, light, flame, etc.)
    • 1886, The Brook, by Tennyson
      I come from haunts of coot and hern, / I make a sudden sally, / And sparkle out among the fern, / To bicker down a valley.
  3. (of rain) To patter.
  4. To skirmish; to exchange blows; to fight.
    • 1606, Philemon Holland, The Historie of Twelve Caesars
      Two egles had a conflict, and bickered together.
Synonyms
  • wrangle
  • See also Thesaurus:squabble
Derived terms
  • bickerer
Translations

Noun

bicker (plural bickers)

  1. A skirmish; an encounter.
  2. (Scotland, obsolete) A fight with stones between two parties of boys.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)
  3. A wrangle; also, a noise, as in angry contention.
  4. The process by which selective eating clubs at Princeton University choose new members.
    • 2005, Alison Fraser, Princeton University: Princeton, New Jersey, College Prowler, Inc (→ISBN), page 41:
      Bicker process varies by club, and there are often concerns of the rights of female students during bicker []
Translations

Etymology 2

From Scots bicker, from Middle English biker. Doublet of beaker.

Noun

bicker (plural bickers)

  1. (Scotland) A wooden drinking-cup or other dish.
    • 1824, James Hogg, The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner, Oxford 2010, p. 6:
      …the liquors were handed around in great fulness, the ale in large wooden bickers, and the brandy in capacious horns of oxen.

Further reading

  • bicker in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • bicker in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Bicker in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)


English

Etymology

Of unknown origin. Perhaps from Danish fjas (nonsense), from Middle Low German (compare German faseln (to maunder, talk nonsense))

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʌs/
  • Rhymes: -ʌs

Noun

fuss (countable and uncountable, plural fusses)

  1. (countable or uncountable) Excessive activity, worry, bother, or talk about something.
    • 1882, Thomas Carlyle, Reminiscences
  2. A complaint or noise; a scene.
  3. An exhibition of affection or admiration.

Translations

Verb

fuss (third-person singular simple present fusses, present participle fussing, simple past and past participle fussed)

  1. (intransitive) To be very worried or excited about something, often too much.
    His grandmother will never quit fussing over his vegetarianism.
  2. (intransitive) To fiddle; fidget; wiggle, or adjust
    Quit fussing with your hair. It looks fine.
  3. (intransitive, especially of babies) To cry or be ill-humoured.
  4. (intransitive, with over) To show affection for, especially animals.
  5. (transitive) To pet.
    He fussed the cat.

Usage notes

  • Generally used with with, over, or about.

Translations

Derived terms

  • fussbudget
  • fussbutton
  • fusspot
  • fussy
  • fuss and bother
  • no muss no fuss

References

Anagrams

  • USSF

Hungarian

Alternative forms

  • fussál

Etymology

fut (to run) +‎ -j (personal suffix)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfuʃː]
  • Hyphenation: fuss
  • Rhymes: -uʃː

Verb

fuss

  1. second-person singular subjunctive present indefinite of fut

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