bid vs command what difference

what is difference between bid and command

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪd/
  • Rhymes: -ɪd

Etymology 1

From Middle English bidden, from Old English biddan (to ask, demand), from Proto-Germanic *bidjaną (to ask), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰedʰ-. Conflated with Old English bēodan (to offer, announce) (see Etymology 2 below). Compare West Frisian bidde, Low German bidden, Dutch bidden (“to pray”), German bitten, Danish bede, Norwegian Bokmål be.

Verb

bid (third-person singular simple present bids, present participle bidding, simple past bid or bade or bad, past participle bid or bidden)

  1. (transitive) To issue a command; to tell.
    He bade me come in.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, Scene V:
      Shylock: […] Why Jessica, I say!
      Launcelot: Why, Jessica!
      Shylock: Who bids thee call? I do not bid thee call.
      Launcelot: Your worship was wont to tell me that I could do nothing without bidding.
  2. (transitive) To invite; to summon.
    She was bidden to the wedding.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, Scene V:
      Jessica: Call you? What is your will?
      Shylock: I am bid forth to supper, Jessica: / […] But wherefore should I go? / I am not bid for love; they flatter me;
  3. (transitive) To utter a greeting or salutation.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act I, Scene III:
      Portia: If I could bid the fifth welcome with so good heart as I / can bid the other four farewell, I should be glad of his / approach; […]
Usage notes

The inflected forms bade, bad, and bidden are falling out of use. Bade remains common in greetings, as in “bade farewell”, but uninflected bid is perhaps more common, and bidden is especially rare.

When bidden does occur, it is usually in an elevated, ironical, or metaphorical style, e.g “I have bidden farewell to my prospects of promotion.”

When bade (spelled bad so rarely that this variant is not mentioned in most dictionaries) is used in formal speech, the pronunciation /bæd/ may be heard. However, when a dated text with the spelling bade is read aloud or recited (e.g. on stage, in school, or in church etc.) the spelling pronunciation /beɪd/ is quite usual.(Can we verify(+) this pronunciation?)

Derived terms
  • bid adieu
  • bid fair
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English beden, from Old English bēodan (to offer, announce), from Proto-Germanic *beudaną (to offer), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewdʰ- (be awake, aware). Conflated with Old English biddan (to ask, demand) (see Etymology 1 above). Compare Low German beden, Dutch bieden, German bieten, Danish byde, Norwegian Bokmål by. More at bede.

Verb

bid (third-person singular simple present bids, present participle bidding, simple past and past participle bid)

  1. (intransitive) To make an offer to pay or accept a certain price.
    Have you ever bid in an auction?
  2. (transitive) To offer as a price.
    She bid £2000 for the Persian carpet.
  3. (intransitive) To make an attempt.
    He was bidding for the chance to coach his team to victory once again.
  4. (transitive, intransitive, card games) To announce (one’s goal), before starting play.
  5. (obsolete) To proclaim (a bede, prayer); to pray.
    • 1590, Edmund Spendser, The Faerie Queene, I.x:
      All night she spent in bidding of her bedes, / And all the day in doing good and godly deedes.
Derived terms
  • forbid
  • misbid
Translations

Noun

bid (plural bids)

  1. An offer at an auction, or to carry out a piece of work.
    His bid was $35,000.
    a bid for a lucrative transport contract
  2. (ultimate frisbee) A (failed) attempt to receive or intercept a pass.
    Nice bid!
  3. An attempt, effort, or pursuit (of a goal).
    Their efforts represented a sincere bid for success.
    She put in her bid for the presidency.
    He put in his bid for office.
    • 1967, William F. Nolan and George Clayton Johnson, Logan’s Run, May 1976 Bantam Books edition, →ISBN, page 16:
      [Running,] Doyle had passed up a dozen chances to go underground. He was swinging east again making another bid for Arcade.
Derived terms
Translations

References

Anagrams

  • DBI, DIB, Dib, IBD, IDB, dib

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch bidden.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bət/, [bət]

Verb

bid (present bid, present participle biddende, past participle gebid)

  1. to pray

References

  • 2007. The UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Department of Linguistics.

Cimbrian

Etymology

Related to German Weide (willow; wicker).

Noun

bid m (plural biddardiminutive bìddale)

  1. (Sette Comuni) wicker, osier

Declension

References

  • “bid” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse bit n, from Proto-Germanic *bitą. Derived from the verb *bītaną (to bite).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥ið]
  • Rhymes: -id

Noun

bid n (singular definite biddet, plural indefinite bid)

  1. bite (act of biting)
Inflection

Etymology 2

From Old Norse biti m, from Proto-Germanic *bitô, cognate with German Bissen. Derived from the verb *bītaną (to bite).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥ið]

Noun

bid c (singular definite bidden, plural indefinite bidder)

  1. bit, morsel
  2. bite, mouthful
Inflection

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥iˀð], [ˈb̥iðˀ]

Verb

bid

  1. imperative of bide

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

bid

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bidden
  2. imperative of bidden

Old Irish

Alternative forms

  • bith

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʲiðʲ/

Verb

bid

  1. inflection of is:
    1. third-person singular past subjunctive
    2. third-person singular future

Mutation


Volapük

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bid]

Noun

bid (nominative plural bids)

  1. (taxonomy) genus
  2. sort; kind; type
  3. race

Declension

Synonyms

  • sot

Derived terms

  • bidäd
  • bidädik
  • bidanem
  • bidik
  • filigabid
  • garidabid
  • hügien bidädik
  • kaktudabid
  • menabid
  • menabidädahet
  • menabidädakomip
  • menabidädihet
  • nimabid
  • planabid
  • vödabid

Welsh

Verb

bid

  1. (literary) third-person singular imperative of bod

Synonyms

  • bydded
  • boed

Mutation


Zhuang

Pronunciation

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /pit˧/
  • Tone numbers: bid8
  • Hyphenation: bid

Noun

bid (Sawndip forms or ⿰虫畢, old orthography bid)

  1. cicada
    Synonyms: (dialectal) biqrengh, (dialectal) nengzceq


English

Etymology

From Middle English commanden, commaunden, comaunden, comanden, from Old French comander (modern French commander), from Vulgar Latin *commandare, from Latin commendare, from com- + mandare, from mandō (I order, command). Compare commend (a doublet), and mandate.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kəˈmɑːnd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /kəˈmænd/
  • Hyphenation: com‧mand

Noun

command (countable and uncountable, plural commands)

  1. An order to do something.
    I was given a command to cease shooting.
  2. The right or authority to order, control or dispose of; the right to be obeyed or to compel obedience.
    to have command of an army
  3. power of control, direction or disposal; mastery.
    he had command of the situation
    England has long held command of the sea
    a good command of language
  4. A position of chief authority; a position involving the right or power to order or control.
    General Smith was placed in command.
  5. The act of commanding; exercise or authority of influence.
    • 1851, Herbert Spencer, Social Statics, p. 180
      Command cannot be otherwise than savage, for it implies an appeal to force, should force be needful.
  6. (military) A body or troops, or any naval or military force, under the control of a particular officer; by extension, any object or body in someone’s charge.
  7. Dominating situation; range or control or oversight; extent of view or outlook.
  8. (computing) A directive to a computer program acting as an interpreter of some kind, in order to perform a specific task.
  9. (baseball) The degree of control a pitcher has over his pitches.
    He’s got good command tonight.
  10. A command performance.
    • 1809, Dorothy Jordan, letter, cited in Claire Tomalin, Mrs Jordan’s Profession, Penguin 2012, p. 220:
      Atkinson [] had hinted to me that the Duke of Richmond was so delighted with my acting that he should not be surprised if there was a second command.

Translations

See also

  • imperative mood

References

  • Command on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

command (third-person singular simple present commands, present participle commanding, simple past and past participle commanded)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To order, give orders; to compel or direct with authority.
    The soldier was commanded to cease firing.
    The king commanded his servant to bring him dinner.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Revenge
      We are commanded to forgive our enemies, but you never read that we are commanded to forgive our friends.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To have or exercise supreme power, control or authority over, especially military; to have under direction or control.
    to command an army or a ship
  3. (transitive) To require with authority; to demand, order, enjoin.
    he commanded silence
    • 2013, Louise Taylor, English talent gets left behind as Premier League keeps importing (in The Guardian, 20 August 2013)[1]
      The reasons for this growing disconnect are myriad and complex but the situation is exacerbated by the reality that those English players who do smash through our game’s “glass ceiling” command radically inflated transfer fees.
  4. (transitive) to dominate through ability, resources, position etc.; to overlook.
    Bridges commanded by a fortified house. (Motley.)
  5. (transitive) To exact, compel or secure by influence; to deserve, claim.
    A good magistrate commands the respect and affections of the people.
    Justice commands the respect and affections of the people.
    The best goods command the best price.
    This job commands a salary of £30,000.
  6. (transitive) To hold, to control the use of.
    The fort commanded the bay.
    • Two wooden bridges led across the river; each was commanded by a fortified house
    • December 1699, Joseph Addison, letter to William Congreve
      One [side] commands a view of the finest garden.
    • 1834, The Hobart Town Magazine (volume 2, page 323)
      [] they made considerable progress in the art of embalming the wild fruits of their native land, so that they might command cranberries and hindberries at all times and seasons.
  7. (intransitive, archaic) To have a view, as from a superior position.
  8. (obsolete) To direct to come; to bestow.

Synonyms

  • (give an order): decree, order

Translations

Derived terms

References

  • command in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • “command”, in OED Online ⁠, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, launched 2000.

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