bid vs offer what difference

what is difference between bid and offer

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪd/
  • Rhymes: -ɪd

Etymology 1

From Middle English bidden, from Old English biddan (to ask, demand), from Proto-Germanic *bidjaną (to ask), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰedʰ-. Conflated with Old English bēodan (to offer, announce) (see Etymology 2 below). Compare West Frisian bidde, Low German bidden, Dutch bidden (“to pray”), German bitten, Danish bede, Norwegian Bokmål be.

Verb

bid (third-person singular simple present bids, present participle bidding, simple past bid or bade or bad, past participle bid or bidden)

  1. (transitive) To issue a command; to tell.
    He bade me come in.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, Scene V:
      Shylock: […] Why Jessica, I say!
      Launcelot: Why, Jessica!
      Shylock: Who bids thee call? I do not bid thee call.
      Launcelot: Your worship was wont to tell me that I could do nothing without bidding.
  2. (transitive) To invite; to summon.
    She was bidden to the wedding.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, Scene V:
      Jessica: Call you? What is your will?
      Shylock: I am bid forth to supper, Jessica: / […] But wherefore should I go? / I am not bid for love; they flatter me;
  3. (transitive) To utter a greeting or salutation.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act I, Scene III:
      Portia: If I could bid the fifth welcome with so good heart as I / can bid the other four farewell, I should be glad of his / approach; […]
Usage notes

The inflected forms bade, bad, and bidden are falling out of use. Bade remains common in greetings, as in “bade farewell”, but uninflected bid is perhaps more common, and bidden is especially rare.

When bidden does occur, it is usually in an elevated, ironical, or metaphorical style, e.g “I have bidden farewell to my prospects of promotion.”

When bade (spelled bad so rarely that this variant is not mentioned in most dictionaries) is used in formal speech, the pronunciation /bæd/ may be heard. However, when a dated text with the spelling bade is read aloud or recited (e.g. on stage, in school, or in church etc.) the spelling pronunciation /beɪd/ is quite usual.(Can we verify(+) this pronunciation?)

Derived terms
  • bid adieu
  • bid fair
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English beden, from Old English bēodan (to offer, announce), from Proto-Germanic *beudaną (to offer), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewdʰ- (be awake, aware). Conflated with Old English biddan (to ask, demand) (see Etymology 1 above). Compare Low German beden, Dutch bieden, German bieten, Danish byde, Norwegian Bokmål by. More at bede.

Verb

bid (third-person singular simple present bids, present participle bidding, simple past and past participle bid)

  1. (intransitive) To make an offer to pay or accept a certain price.
    Have you ever bid in an auction?
  2. (transitive) To offer as a price.
    She bid £2000 for the Persian carpet.
  3. (intransitive) To make an attempt.
    He was bidding for the chance to coach his team to victory once again.
  4. (transitive, intransitive, card games) To announce (one’s goal), before starting play.
  5. (obsolete) To proclaim (a bede, prayer); to pray.
    • 1590, Edmund Spendser, The Faerie Queene, I.x:
      All night she spent in bidding of her bedes, / And all the day in doing good and godly deedes.
Derived terms
  • forbid
  • misbid
Translations

Noun

bid (plural bids)

  1. An offer at an auction, or to carry out a piece of work.
    His bid was $35,000.
    a bid for a lucrative transport contract
  2. (ultimate frisbee) A (failed) attempt to receive or intercept a pass.
    Nice bid!
  3. An attempt, effort, or pursuit (of a goal).
    Their efforts represented a sincere bid for success.
    She put in her bid for the presidency.
    He put in his bid for office.
    • 1967, William F. Nolan and George Clayton Johnson, Logan’s Run, May 1976 Bantam Books edition, →ISBN, page 16:
      [Running,] Doyle had passed up a dozen chances to go underground. He was swinging east again making another bid for Arcade.
Derived terms
Translations

References

Anagrams

  • DBI, DIB, Dib, IBD, IDB, dib

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch bidden.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bət/, [bət]

Verb

bid (present bid, present participle biddende, past participle gebid)

  1. to pray

References

  • 2007. The UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Department of Linguistics.

Cimbrian

Etymology

Related to German Weide (willow; wicker).

Noun

bid m (plural biddardiminutive bìddale)

  1. (Sette Comuni) wicker, osier

Declension

References

  • “bid” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse bit n, from Proto-Germanic *bitą. Derived from the verb *bītaną (to bite).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥ið]
  • Rhymes: -id

Noun

bid n (singular definite biddet, plural indefinite bid)

  1. bite (act of biting)
Inflection

Etymology 2

From Old Norse biti m, from Proto-Germanic *bitô, cognate with German Bissen. Derived from the verb *bītaną (to bite).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥ið]

Noun

bid c (singular definite bidden, plural indefinite bidder)

  1. bit, morsel
  2. bite, mouthful
Inflection

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥iˀð], [ˈb̥iðˀ]

Verb

bid

  1. imperative of bide

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

bid

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bidden
  2. imperative of bidden

Old Irish

Alternative forms

  • bith

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʲiðʲ/

Verb

bid

  1. inflection of is:
    1. third-person singular past subjunctive
    2. third-person singular future

Mutation


Volapük

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bid]

Noun

bid (nominative plural bids)

  1. (taxonomy) genus
  2. sort; kind; type
  3. race

Declension

Synonyms

  • sot

Derived terms

  • bidäd
  • bidädik
  • bidanem
  • bidik
  • filigabid
  • garidabid
  • hügien bidädik
  • kaktudabid
  • menabid
  • menabidädahet
  • menabidädakomip
  • menabidädihet
  • nimabid
  • planabid
  • vödabid

Welsh

Verb

bid

  1. (literary) third-person singular imperative of bod

Synonyms

  • bydded
  • boed

Mutation


Zhuang

Pronunciation

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /pit˧/
  • Tone numbers: bid8
  • Hyphenation: bid

Noun

bid (Sawndip forms or ⿰虫畢, old orthography bid)

  1. cicada
    Synonyms: (dialectal) biqrengh, (dialectal) nengzceq


English

Alternative forms

  • offre (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɒfə(ɹ)/, /ˈɔːfə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɔfɚ/
  • (cotcaught merger, Canada) IPA(key): /ˈɑfɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒfə(ɹ), -ɔːfə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: of‧fer

Etymology 1

From Middle English offer, from Old English offrian (offer or make a sacrifice) rather than from Old French offre (offer), from offrir (to offer), from Latin offerō (to present, bring before). Compare North Frisian offer (sacrifice, donation, fee), Dutch offer (offering, sacrifice), German Opfer (victim, sacrifice), Danish offer (victim, sacrifice), Icelandic offr (offering). See verb below.

Noun

offer (plural offers)

  1. A proposal that has been made.
  2. Something put forth, bid, proffered or tendered.
  3. (law) An invitation to enter into a binding contract communicated to another party which contains terms sufficiently definite to create an enforceable contract if the other party accepts the invitation.
Derived terms
  • make an offer
Descendants
  • Tokelauan: ofo
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English offren, offrien, from Old English offrian (to offer, sacrifice, bring an oblation), from Latin offerō (to present, bestow, bring before, literally to bring to), from Latin ob + ferō (bring, carry), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer-, *bʰrē- (to carry, bear), later reinforced by Old French offrir (to offer). Cognate with Old Frisian offria (to offer), Old Dutch offrōn (to offer), German opfern (to offer), Old Norse offra (to offer). More at ob-, bear.

Verb

offer (third-person singular simple present offers, present participle offering, simple past and past participle offered)

  1. (intransitive) To propose or express one’s willingness (to do something).
  2. (transitive) To present in words; to proffer; to make a proposal of; to suggest.
  3. (transitive) To place at someone’s disposal; to present (something) to be either accepted or turned down.
  4. (transitive) To present (something) to God or gods as a gesture of worship, or for a sacrifice.
    • 1611, Bible (King James Version), Exodus xxix. 36
      Thou shalt offer every day a bullock for a sin offering for atonement.
  5. (transitive, engineering) To place (something) in a position where it can be added to an existing mechanical assembly.
  6. (transitive) To bid, as a price, reward, or wages.
  7. (intransitive) To happen, to present itself.
    • The occasion offers, and the youth complies.
  8. (obsolete) To make an attempt; typically used with at.
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, A Discourse of a War with Spain
      I will not offer at that I cannot master.
  9. (transitive) To put in opposition to; to manifest in an offensive way; to threaten.
Usage notes
  • This is a catenative verb that takes the to-infinitive. See Appendix:English catenative verbs
Related terms
  • offering
  • offertory
  • oblate
  • oblation
Translations

Etymology 3

off +‎ -er

Noun

offer (plural offers)

  1. (used in combinations from phrasal verbs) agent noun of off

Anagrams

  • offre, reffo

Danish

Noun

offer n (singular definite ofret or offeret, plural indefinite ofre)

  1. sacrifice
  2. victim

Inflection

Derived terms

  • slagteoffer
  • ofre

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔfər/
  • Hyphenation: of‧fer
  • Rhymes: -ɔfər

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch offere, from Old Dutch [Term?].

Noun

offer n (plural offers, diminutive offertje n)

  1. sacrifice
  2. victim
Derived terms
  • brandoffer
  • offeren
  • plengoffer
  • reukoffer
  • slachtoffer
  • zoenoffer
Descendants
  • Negerhollands: offer
  • Papiamentu: offer (dated)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

offer

  1. first-person singular present indicative of offeren
  2. imperative of offeren

Latin

Verb

offer

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of offerō

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse offr

Noun

offer n (definite singular offeret, indefinite plural offer or ofre, definite plural ofra or ofrene)

  1. a sacrifice
  2. a victim, a casualty

Derived terms

  • dødsoffer
  • selvmordsoffer

References

  • “offer” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse offr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔfɛr/ (example of pronunciation)

Noun

offer n (definite singular offeret, indefinite plural offer, definite plural offera)

  1. a sacrifice
  2. a victim, a casualty

Derived terms

  • dødsoffer

References

  • “offer” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse offr.

Pronunciation

Noun

offer n

  1. sacrifice
  2. victim

Declension

Derived terms

References

  • offer in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)
  • offer in Svensk ordbok (SO)
  • offer in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)
  • offer in Elof Hellquist, Svensk etymologisk ordbok (1st ed., 1922)
  • offer in Knut Fredrik Söderwall, Ordbok öfver svenska medeltids-språket, del 2:1: M-T

Anagrams

  • Roffe

Welsh

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin offerenda.

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales, standard, colloquial) IPA(key): /ˈɔfɛr/
    • (North Wales, colloquial) IPA(key): /ˈɔfar/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /ˈoːfɛr/, /ˈɔfɛr/

Noun

offer f (plural offerau or offeriau or offrau)

  1. equipment

Mutation

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