bill vs charge what difference

what is difference between bill and charge

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪl/, [bɪɫ], enPR: bîl
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Etymology 1

From Middle English bill, bille, bil, from Old English bil, bill (a hooked point; curved weapon; two-edged sword), from Proto-Germanic *bilją (axe; sword; blade), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyH- (to strike; beat). Cognate with West Frisian bile (axe), Dutch bijl (axe), German Bille (axe).

Noun

bill (plural bills)

  1. Any of various bladed or pointed hand weapons, originally designating an Anglo-Saxon sword, and later a weapon of infantry, especially in the 14th and 15th centuries, commonly consisting of a broad, heavy, double-edged, hook-shaped blade, with a short pike at the back and another at the top, attached to the end of a long staff.
    • France had no infantry that dared to face the English bows and bills.
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons.
      In the British Museum there is an entry of a warrant, granted to Nicholas Spicer, authorising him to impress smiths for making two thousand Welch bills or glaives.
    Synonym: polearm
  2. A cutting instrument, with hook-shaped point, and fitted with a handle, used in pruning, etc.; a billhook.
    Synonyms: billhook, hand bill, hedge bill
  3. Somebody armed with a bill; a billman.
    Synonym: billman
  4. A pickaxe, or mattock.
  5. (nautical) The extremity of the arm of an anchor; the point of or beyond the fluke (also called the peak).
Derived terms
  • brown-bill
Translations

Verb

bill (third-person singular simple present bills, present participle billing, simple past and past participle billed)

  1. (transitive) To dig, chop, etc., with a bill.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bill, bil, bille, bile, from Old English bile (beak (of a bird); trunk (of an elephant)), of unknown origin. Perhaps from a special use of Old English bil, bill (hook; sword) (see above).

Noun

bill (plural bills)

  1. The beak of a bird, especially when small or flattish; sometimes also used with reference to a platypus, turtle, or other animal.
    • 1595, William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act III, Scene I, line 125.
      The woosel cock so black of hue, With orange-tawny bill, The throstle with his note so true, The wren with little quill…
    Synonyms: beak, neb, nib, pecker
  2. A beak-like projection, especially a promontory.
  3. Of a cap or hat: the brim or peak, serving as a shade to keep sun off the face and out of the eyes.
Derived terms
  • duckbill
Translations

Verb

bill (third-person singular simple present bills, present participle billing, simple past and past participle billed)

  1. (obsolete) to peck
  2. to stroke bill against bill, with reference to doves; to caress in fondness
    • As the ox hath his bow, sir, the horse his curb and the falcon her bells, so man hath his desires; and as pigeons bill, so wedlock would be nibbling.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English bille, from Anglo-Norman bille, from Old French bulle, from Medieval Latin bulla (seal”, “sealed document). Compare bull.

Noun

bill (plural bills)

  1. A written list or inventory. (Now obsolete except in specific senses or set phrases; bill of lading, bill of goods, etc.)
  2. A document, originally sealed; a formal statement or official memorandum. (Now obsolete except with certain qualifying words; bill of health, bill of sale etc.)
  3. A draft of a law, presented to a legislature for enactment; a proposed or projected law.
    • 1600, William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act II, Scene I, line 28.
      Why, I’ll exhibit a bill in the parliament for the putting down of men.
    Synonym: measure
  4. (obsolete, law) A declaration made in writing, stating some wrong the complainant has suffered from the defendant, or a fault committed by some person against a law.
    • 1853, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, ch 1:
      … the legion of bills in the suit have been transformed into mere bills of mortality …
  5. (US, Canada) A piece of paper money; a banknote.
  6. A written note of goods sold, services rendered, or work done, with the price or charge; an invoice.
    • 1607, William Shakespeare, Timon of Athens, Act III, Scene IV, line 85.
      My lord, here is my bill.
    Synonyms: account, invoice
  7. A paper, written or printed, and posted up or given away, to advertise something, as a lecture, a play, or the sale of goods
    Synonyms: broadsheet, broadside, card, circular, flier, flyer, handbill, poster, posting, placard, notice, throwaway
    • 1595, William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act I, Scene II, line 104.
      In the meantime I will draw a bill of properties, such as our play wants.
  8. A writing binding the signer or signers to pay a certain sum at a future day or on demand, with or without interest, as may be stated in the document; a bill of exchange. In the United States, it is usually called a note, a note of hand, or a promissory note.
    • 1600, William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act I, Scene I, line 8.
      Ay, and Rato-lorum too; and a gentleman born, Master Parson; who writes himself Armigero, in any bill, warrant, quittance, or obligation, Armigero.
    Synonyms: bank bill, banker’s bill, bank note, banknote, Federal Reserve note, government note, greenback, note
  9. A set of items presented together.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Thai: บิล (bin)
  • Tokelauan: pili
Translations
See also
  • check

Verb

bill (third-person singular simple present bills, present participle billing, simple past and past participle billed)

  1. (transitive) To advertise by a bill or public notice.
    Synonym: placard
  2. (transitive) To charge; to send a bill to.
    Synonym: charge
    • 1989, Michelle Green, Understanding Health Insurance: A Guide to Billing and Reimbursement
      The physician explains that this is an option for her and that she can sign the facility’s ABN so that if Medicare denies the claim, the facility can bill her for the scan.
Translations

Etymology 4

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

bill (plural bills)

  1. The bell, or boom, of the bittern.
    • 1793, William Wordsworth, An Evening Walk
      The bittern’s hollow bill was heard.

Cimbrian

Etymology 1

From Middle High German wille, from Old High German willo, from Proto-Germanic *wiljô (will, wish, desire). Cognate with German Wille, English will.

Noun

bill m

  1. (Sette Comuni) will (legal document)
    Synonym: testamentén

Etymology 2

From Middle High German wilde, from Old High German wildi, from Proto-West Germanic *wilþī, from Proto-Germanic *wilþijaz (wild). Cognate with German wild, English wild.

Adjective

bill (comparative billor, superlative dar billorste)

  1. (Sette Comuni) wild, crazy, mad
Declension
Derived terms
  • billa gòas
  • billa hénna
  • billar haano
  • billar balt
  • dorbillaran

References

  • “bill” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

French

Etymology

From English bill; doublet of bulle (bubble).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bil/

Noun

bill m (plural bills)

  1. (law) bill (draft UK law)
  2. (Canada) bill (invoice in a restaurant etc)

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Etymology 1

From Old Swedish bilder, from Old Norse bíldr, from Proto-Germanic *bīþlaz (axe). An instrumental derivation of *bītaną (to bite). Closely related to bila (broadaxe).

Noun

bill c

  1. (agriculture) a share; the cutting blade of a plough
Declension
Derived terms
  • plogbill

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English bill, from Middle English bille, from Anglo-Norman bille, from Old French bulle, from Medieval Latin bulla (seal, sealed document). Doublet of bulla.

Noun

bill c

  1. (law) a draft of a law in English-speaking countries
Declension

References

  • bill in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)


English

Etymology

From Middle English chargen, from Old French chargier, from Medieval Latin carricō (to load), from Latin carrus (a car, wagon); see car. Doublet of cargo.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /t͡ʃɑːd͡ʒ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /t͡ʃɑɹd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)dʒ

Noun

charge (countable and uncountable, plural charges)

  1. The amount of money levied for a service.
  2. (military) A ground attack against a prepared enemy.
  3. A forceful forward movement.
  4. An accusation.
    Synonym: count
    1. An official description (by the police or a court) of a crime that somebody may be guilty of
    2. An accusation by a person or organization.
      • 2005, Lesley Brown (translator), Plato, Sophist. 261a.
  5. (physics and chemistry) An electric charge.
  6. The scope of someone’s responsibility.
    • 1848 April 24, John K. Kane, opinion, United States v. Hutchison, as reported in The Pennsylvania law Journal, June 1848 edition, as reprinted in, 1848,The Pennsylvania Law Journal volume 7, page 366 [2]:
  7. Someone or something entrusted to one’s care, such as a child to a babysitter or a student to a teacher.
  8. A load or burden; cargo.
  9. An instruction.
  10. (basketball) An offensive foul in which the player with the ball moves into a stationary defender.
  11. (firearms) A measured amount of powder and/or shot in a cartridge.
  12. (by extension) A measured amount of explosive.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      Watt might have broken the door down, with an axe, or a crow, or a small charge of explosive, but this might have aroused Erskine’s suspicions, and Watt did not want that.
  13. (heraldry) An image displayed on an escutcheon.
  14. (weaponry) A position (of a weapon) fitted for attack.
  15. (farriery) A sort of plaster or ointment.
  16. (obsolete) Weight; import; value.
  17. (historical or obsolete) A measure of thirty-six pigs of lead, each pig weighing about seventy pounds; a charre.
  18. (ecclesiastical) An address given at a church service concluding a visitation.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

charge (third-person singular simple present charges, present participle charging, simple past and past participle charged)

  1. to assign a duty or responsibility to
    • Moses [] charged you to love the Lord your God.
  2. (transitive) to assign (a debit) to an account
  3. (transitive) to pay on account, as by using a credit card
  4. (transitive, intransitive) to require payment (of) (a price or fee, for goods, services, etc.)
  5. (possibly archaic) to sell at a given price.
  6. (law) to formally accuse (a person) of a crime.
  7. to impute or ascribe
    • No more accuse thy pen, but charge the crime / On native sloth, and negligence of time.
  8. to call to account; to challenge
  9. (transitive) to place a burden, load or responsibility on or in
    • the charging of children’s memories [] with rules
    • 1800, James Hogg, The Mysterious Bride
      [H]er grandfather [] charged her as she valued her life never to mention that again []
    • 1911, The Encyclopedia Britannica, entry on Moya:
      [A] huge torrent of boiling black mud, charged with blocks of rock and moving with enormous rapidity, rolled like an avalanche down the gorge.
    1. to ornament with or cause to bear
    2. (heraldry) to assume as a bearing
    3. (heraldry) to add to or represent on
  10. (transitive) to load equipment with material required for its use, as a firearm with powder, a fire hose with water, a chemical reactor with raw materials
    Charge your weapons; we’re moving up.
    1. (transitive) to cause to take on an electric charge
    2. (transitive) to replenish energy to (a battery, or a device containing a battery) by use of an electrical device plugged into a power outlet.
    3. (intransitive, of a battery or a device containing a battery) To replenish energy.
  11. (intransitive) to move forward quickly and forcefully, particularly in combat and/or on horseback
    1. (military, transitive and intransitive) to attack by moving forward quickly in a group
    2. (basketball) to commit a charging foul
    3. (cricket, of a batsman) to take a few steps down the pitch towards the bowler as he delivers the ball, either to disrupt the length of the delivery, or to get into a better position to hit the ball
  12. (transitive, of a hunting dog) to lie on the belly and be still (A command given by a hunter to a dog)

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • charge in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • charge in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Creagh

Dutch

Alternative forms

  • chargie (obsolete)

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French charge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃɑr.ʒə/
  • Hyphenation: char‧ge

Noun

charge f (plural charges)

  1. A charge (fast ground attack).

Derived terms

  • cavaleriecharge

Related terms

  • chargeren

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: sarsie

French

Etymology

From Middle French charge, from Old French charge, carge, equivalent to a deverbal from charger.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃaʁʒ/

Noun

charge f (plural charges)

  1. load, burden
  2. cargo, freight
  3. responsibility, charge
  4. (law) charge
  5. (military) charge
  6. caricature, comic exaggeration
  7. (physics) charge
  8. (heraldry) charge
  9. (in the plural) costs, expenses

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Portuguese: charge

Verb

charge

  1. first-person singular present indicative of charger
  2. third-person singular present indicative of charger
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of charger
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of charger
  5. second-person singular imperative of charger

Further reading

  • “charge” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • gâcher

Middle English

Verb

charge

  1. first-person singular present indicative of chargen

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from French charge.

Noun

charge f (plural charges)

  1. cartoon (satire of public figures)
    Synonym: cartum

Further reading

  • charge on the Portuguese Wikipedia.Wikipedia pt

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