bill vs circular what difference

what is difference between bill and circular

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪl/, [bɪɫ], enPR: bîl
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Etymology 1

From Middle English bill, bille, bil, from Old English bil, bill (a hooked point; curved weapon; two-edged sword), from Proto-Germanic *bilją (axe; sword; blade), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyH- (to strike; beat). Cognate with West Frisian bile (axe), Dutch bijl (axe), German Bille (axe).

Noun

bill (plural bills)

  1. Any of various bladed or pointed hand weapons, originally designating an Anglo-Saxon sword, and later a weapon of infantry, especially in the 14th and 15th centuries, commonly consisting of a broad, heavy, double-edged, hook-shaped blade, with a short pike at the back and another at the top, attached to the end of a long staff.
    • France had no infantry that dared to face the English bows and bills.
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons.
      In the British Museum there is an entry of a warrant, granted to Nicholas Spicer, authorising him to impress smiths for making two thousand Welch bills or glaives.
    Synonym: polearm
  2. A cutting instrument, with hook-shaped point, and fitted with a handle, used in pruning, etc.; a billhook.
    Synonyms: billhook, hand bill, hedge bill
  3. Somebody armed with a bill; a billman.
    Synonym: billman
  4. A pickaxe, or mattock.
  5. (nautical) The extremity of the arm of an anchor; the point of or beyond the fluke (also called the peak).
Derived terms
  • brown-bill
Translations

Verb

bill (third-person singular simple present bills, present participle billing, simple past and past participle billed)

  1. (transitive) To dig, chop, etc., with a bill.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bill, bil, bille, bile, from Old English bile (beak (of a bird); trunk (of an elephant)), of unknown origin. Perhaps from a special use of Old English bil, bill (hook; sword) (see above).

Noun

bill (plural bills)

  1. The beak of a bird, especially when small or flattish; sometimes also used with reference to a platypus, turtle, or other animal.
    • 1595, William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act III, Scene I, line 125.
      The woosel cock so black of hue, With orange-tawny bill, The throstle with his note so true, The wren with little quill…
    Synonyms: beak, neb, nib, pecker
  2. A beak-like projection, especially a promontory.
  3. Of a cap or hat: the brim or peak, serving as a shade to keep sun off the face and out of the eyes.
Derived terms
  • duckbill
Translations

Verb

bill (third-person singular simple present bills, present participle billing, simple past and past participle billed)

  1. (obsolete) to peck
  2. to stroke bill against bill, with reference to doves; to caress in fondness
    • As the ox hath his bow, sir, the horse his curb and the falcon her bells, so man hath his desires; and as pigeons bill, so wedlock would be nibbling.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English bille, from Anglo-Norman bille, from Old French bulle, from Medieval Latin bulla (seal”, “sealed document). Compare bull.

Noun

bill (plural bills)

  1. A written list or inventory. (Now obsolete except in specific senses or set phrases; bill of lading, bill of goods, etc.)
  2. A document, originally sealed; a formal statement or official memorandum. (Now obsolete except with certain qualifying words; bill of health, bill of sale etc.)
  3. A draft of a law, presented to a legislature for enactment; a proposed or projected law.
    • 1600, William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act II, Scene I, line 28.
      Why, I’ll exhibit a bill in the parliament for the putting down of men.
    Synonym: measure
  4. (obsolete, law) A declaration made in writing, stating some wrong the complainant has suffered from the defendant, or a fault committed by some person against a law.
    • 1853, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, ch 1:
      … the legion of bills in the suit have been transformed into mere bills of mortality …
  5. (US, Canada) A piece of paper money; a banknote.
  6. A written note of goods sold, services rendered, or work done, with the price or charge; an invoice.
    • 1607, William Shakespeare, Timon of Athens, Act III, Scene IV, line 85.
      My lord, here is my bill.
    Synonyms: account, invoice
  7. A paper, written or printed, and posted up or given away, to advertise something, as a lecture, a play, or the sale of goods
    Synonyms: broadsheet, broadside, card, circular, flier, flyer, handbill, poster, posting, placard, notice, throwaway
    • 1595, William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act I, Scene II, line 104.
      In the meantime I will draw a bill of properties, such as our play wants.
  8. A writing binding the signer or signers to pay a certain sum at a future day or on demand, with or without interest, as may be stated in the document; a bill of exchange. In the United States, it is usually called a note, a note of hand, or a promissory note.
    • 1600, William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act I, Scene I, line 8.
      Ay, and Rato-lorum too; and a gentleman born, Master Parson; who writes himself Armigero, in any bill, warrant, quittance, or obligation, Armigero.
    Synonyms: bank bill, banker’s bill, bank note, banknote, Federal Reserve note, government note, greenback, note
  9. A set of items presented together.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Thai: บิล (bin)
  • Tokelauan: pili
Translations
See also
  • check

Verb

bill (third-person singular simple present bills, present participle billing, simple past and past participle billed)

  1. (transitive) To advertise by a bill or public notice.
    Synonym: placard
  2. (transitive) To charge; to send a bill to.
    Synonym: charge
    • 1989, Michelle Green, Understanding Health Insurance: A Guide to Billing and Reimbursement
      The physician explains that this is an option for her and that she can sign the facility’s ABN so that if Medicare denies the claim, the facility can bill her for the scan.
Translations

Etymology 4

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

bill (plural bills)

  1. The bell, or boom, of the bittern.
    • 1793, William Wordsworth, An Evening Walk
      The bittern’s hollow bill was heard.

Cimbrian

Etymology 1

From Middle High German wille, from Old High German willo, from Proto-Germanic *wiljô (will, wish, desire). Cognate with German Wille, English will.

Noun

bill m

  1. (Sette Comuni) will (legal document)
    Synonym: testamentén

Etymology 2

From Middle High German wilde, from Old High German wildi, from Proto-West Germanic *wilþī, from Proto-Germanic *wilþijaz (wild). Cognate with German wild, English wild.

Adjective

bill (comparative billor, superlative dar billorste)

  1. (Sette Comuni) wild, crazy, mad
Declension
Derived terms
  • billa gòas
  • billa hénna
  • billar haano
  • billar balt
  • dorbillaran

References

  • “bill” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

French

Etymology

From English bill; doublet of bulle (bubble).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bil/

Noun

bill m (plural bills)

  1. (law) bill (draft UK law)
  2. (Canada) bill (invoice in a restaurant etc)

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Etymology 1

From Old Swedish bilder, from Old Norse bíldr, from Proto-Germanic *bīþlaz (axe). An instrumental derivation of *bītaną (to bite). Closely related to bila (broadaxe).

Noun

bill c

  1. (agriculture) a share; the cutting blade of a plough
Declension
Derived terms
  • plogbill

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English bill, from Middle English bille, from Anglo-Norman bille, from Old French bulle, from Medieval Latin bulla (seal, sealed document). Doublet of bulla.

Noun

bill c

  1. (law) a draft of a law in English-speaking countries
Declension

References

  • bill in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)


English

Etymology

From Middle English circuler, circuleer, circulere, from Old French circulier, from Late Latin circularis, from Latin circulus, diminutive of circus (ring).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈsɜːk.jə.lə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈsɝk.jə.lɚ/
  • Hyphenation: cir‧cu‧lar

Adjective

circular (comparative more circular, superlative most circular)

  1. Of or relating to a circle.
  2. In the shape of, or moving in a circle.
  3. Circuitous or roundabout.
  4. Referring back to itself, so as to prevent computation or comprehension; infinitely recursive.
    circular reasoning
    Your dictionary defines “brave” as “courageous”, and “courageous” as “brave”. That’s a circular definition.
    a circular formula in a spreadsheet
  5. Distributed to a large number of persons.
    • 1827, Henry Hallam, The Constitutional History of England
      a proclamation of Henry III., [] doubtless circular throughout England
  6. (obsolete) Perfect; complete.
    • 1632, Philip Massinger, Maid of Honour, act I, scene 2:
      A man so absolute and circular / In all those wished-for rarities that may take / A virgin captive.
  7. (archaic) Adhering to a fixed circle of legends; cyclic; hence, mean; inferior.
    • February 1, 1711, John Dennis, on the Genius and Writings of Shakespeare
      Had Virgil been a circular poet, and closely adhered to history, how could the Romans have had Dido?

Synonyms

  • ringlike
  • ring-shaped
  • round-like

Hyponyms

  • semicircular

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

circular (plural circulars)

  1. Synonym of flyer: a printed advertisement, directive, or notice intended for mass circulation.
    • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 55:
      The pigeon-hole was also stuffed with circulars and hand-bills.
  2. Short for circular letter.
  3. Short for circular file.
  4. (dated) A sleeveless cloak cut from a circular pattern.
  5. A shuttle bus with a circular route.

See also

  • advertisement
  • booklet
  • brochure
  • catalogue, catalog
  • flier, flyer
  • handbill, hand bill
  • junk mail
  • leaflet
  • pamphlet

Verb

circular (third-person singular simple present circulars, present participle circularing, simple past and past participle circulared)

  1. To distribute circulars to or at.
  2. To extend in a circular direction.

Asturian

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin circularis, from Latin circulus.

Adjective

circular (epicene, plural circulares)

  1. circular

Related terms

  • círculu

Verb

circular (first-person singular indicative present circulo, past participle circuláu)

  1. to circle

Conjugation

Related terms

  • círculu

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /siɾ.kuˈla/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /sir.kuˈla/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /siɾ.kuˈlaɾ/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Late Latin circularis, from Latin circulus.

Adjective

circular (masculine and feminine plural circulars)

  1. circular

Noun

circular f (plural circulars)

  1. circular

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Late Latin circulo, circulare, post-Augustan form of Latin circulor.

Verb

circular (first-person singular present circulo, past participle circulat)

  1. to circulate
  2. to move, to travel

Conjugation

Related terms

  • cercle

Further reading

  • “circular” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “circular” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “circular” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “circular” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Galician

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin circularis, from Latin circulus.

Adjective

circular m or f (plural circulares)

  1. (geometry) circular

Related terms

  • círculo

Portuguese

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Late Latin circulāris (circular round), from Latin circulus, corresponding to círculo +‎ -ar.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: cir‧cu‧lar

Adjective

circular m or f (plural circulares, comparable)

  1. circular; round
    Synonyms: redondo, rotundo
  2. running in a loop
  3. (rhetoric, lexicography) circular (referring back to itself)
  4. circular (distributed to a large number of people)

Noun

circular f (plural circulares)

  1. circular letter (official communication distributed to interested parties)
  2. (Portugal) ring road
    Synonyms: (Portugal) circunvalação, (Brazil) anel rodoviário, (Brazil) rodoanel

Noun

circular m (plural circulares)

  1. (Brazil) circular (shuttle bus that runs in a loop)

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Latin circulō, circulāre (I make round), post-Augustan form of Latin circulor.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: cir‧cu‧lar

Verb

circular (first-person singular present indicative circulo, past participle circulado)

  1. (transitive) to circle (to place a circle around)
    Synonym: circundar
  2. (intransitive) to circle (to move around an axis)
    Synonyms: girar, rodar
  3. (intransitive) to circulate (to move through a circuit)
  4. (intransitive) to flow freely
  5. (intransitive, or transitive with por) to move about; to walk around
  6. (transitive) to circulate; to disseminate; to spread
  7. (intransitive) to circulate; to be disseminated; to be spread; to go around
    1. (economics) to circulate (to be valid as currency)
    2. (media) to circulate (to be published and distributed)
Conjugation

Romanian

Etymology

From French circulaire

Adjective

circular m or n (feminine singular circulară, masculine plural circulari, feminine and neuter plural circulare)

  1. circular

Declension


Spanish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Late Latin circulāris, from Latin circulus.

Adjective

circular (plural circulares)

  1. circular

Noun

circular f (plural circulares)

  1. circular (advertisement)

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Late Latin circulāre, present active infinitive of circulō, post-Augustan form of Latin circulor. Doublet of the inherited cerchar.

Verb

circular (first-person singular present circulo, first-person singular preterite circulé, past participle circulado)

  1. to circulate
  2. to go round, move around
  3. to scram, clear off
Conjugation

Related terms

  • círculo

References


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