billet vs canton what difference

what is difference between billet and canton

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, General American) IPA(key): /ˈbɪlɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪlɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English bylet, from Anglo-Norman billette (list, schedule), from bille +‎ -ette, from Latin bulla (document).

Noun

billet (plural billets)

  1. A short informal letter.
  2. A written order to quarter soldiers.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle French billette (schedule), from bullette, diminutive form of bulle (document), from Medieval Latin bulla, hence cognate with etymology 1 above.

Noun

billet (plural billets)

  1. A place where a soldier is assigned to lodge.
    • 1997, Chris Horrocks, Introducing Foucault, page 9 (Totem Books, Icon Books; →ISBN
      17 June 1940: Prime Minister Pétain requests armistice. Germans use the Foucaults’ holiday home as officers’ billet. Foucault steals firewood for school from collaborationist militia. Foucault does well at school, but messes up his summer exams in 1940.
  2. Temporary lodgings in a private residence, such as is organised for members of a visiting sports team.
  3. An allocated space or berth in a boat or ship.
  4. (figuratively) Berth; position.
    • 1897, Pall Mall Magazine
      His shafts of satire fly straight to their billet, and there they rankle.

Verb

billet (third-person singular simple present billets, present participle billeting or billetting, simple past and past participle billeted or billetted)

  1. (transitive, of a householder etc.) To lodge soldiers, or guests, usually by order.
    • Billeted in so antiquated a mansion.
  2. (intransitive, of a soldier) To lodge, or be quartered, in a private house.
  3. (transitive) To direct, by a ticket or note, where to lodge.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English billet, bylet, belet, billette, from Old French billette, from bille (log, tree trunk), from Vulgar Latin *bilia, probably of Gaulish origin (compare Old Irish bile (tree)).

Noun

billet (plural billets)

  1. (metallurgy) A semi-finished length of metal.
  2. A short piece of wood, especially one used as firewood.
  3. A short cutting of sugar cane produced by a harvester or used for planting.
  4. (heraldry) A rectangle used as a charge on an escutcheon.
  5. (architecture) An ornament in Norman work, resembling a billet of wood, either square or round.
  6. (saddlery) A strap that enters a buckle.
  7. A loop that receives the end of a buckled strap.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
Translations

Etymology 4

Noun

billet (plural billets)

  1. Alternative form of billard (coalfish)

Anagrams

  • LIBlet, Litbel

Danish

Etymology

From French billet.

Noun

billet c (singular definite billetten, plural indefinite billetter)

  1. ticket (admission to entertainment, pass for transportation)

Inflection

Further reading

  • “billet” in Den Danske Ordbog

French

Etymology

From Old French billette, from Latin bulla. See French boulette.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bi.jɛ/

Noun

billet m (plural billets)

  1. ticket
  2. note, a brief message
  3. (short for billet de banque) banknote

Derived terms

  • distributeur de billets

Related terms

  • billet de banque (bank note)
  • billet-doux
  • billette
  • billetterie
  • billetiste

Descendants

Further reading

  • “billet” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Etymology 1

1530s, from Middle French canton, from Old French canton (corner); heraldic sense from the 1570s, geographic sense from c. 1600.

Alternative forms

  • kanton

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkæntn̩/
  • IPA(key): /ˈkæntɒn/ (especially in the flag sense)

Noun

canton (plural cantons)

  1. A division of a political unit.
    • 1912, Joseph McCabe (translator), We Must Take Sides; or, The Principal of Action (originally by Voltaire)
      These three millions live in a small canton of Egypt which cannot maintain twenty thousand people
    • 20 May, 1686, Gilbert Burnet, letter from Nimmengen
    1. One of the states comprising the Swiss Confederation.
    2. A subdivision of an arrondissement of France.
    3. A division of Luxembourg, Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, etc.
    4. (obsolete) A subdivision of a county, of Quebec, Canada; equivalent to a township.
  2. A small community or clan.
  3. A subdivision of a flag, the rectangular inset on the upper hoist (i.e., flagpole) side (e.g., the stars of the US national flag are in a canton).
  4. (heraldry) A division of a shield occupying one third of the chief, usually on the dexter side, formed by a perpendicular line from the top meeting a horizontal line from the side.
Translations

Verb

canton (third-person singular simple present cantons, present participle cantoning, simple past and past participle cantoned)

  1. (transitive) To delineate as a separate district.
  2. (transitive) To divide into cantons.
  3. (transitive) To allot quarters to troops.

Etymology 2

Noun

canton (plural cantons)

  1. (obsolete) A song or canto.

Anagrams

  • Conant, Nacton, cannot, nonact, noncat

French

Etymology

From Middle French canton, from Old French canton (from the 1240s), from Old Occitan canton (corner; canton) (recorded before 1218), adopted in Occitan from North Italian (Gallo-Italic, early Lombard) cantone (edge, corner; canton), ultimately representing Latin cant- (rim (of a wheel)) with the addition of the (accusative -ōnem) suffix forming augmentatives in Romance.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɑ̃.tɔ̃/

Noun

canton m (plural cantons)

  1. canton (of Switzerland, France or Luxembourg)
  2. township (of Canada)
  3. (heraldry) canton

Descendants

  • German: Kanton

Further reading

  • “canton” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Occitan

Etymology

From Gallo-Italic cantone. From canto + -one. Related to Latin canthus (rim (of a wheel)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kanˈtu/

Noun

canton m (plural cantons)

  1. corner
  2. canton

Derived terms

  • cantonal
  • cantonar
  • cantonada

Romanian

Etymology

From French canton.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kanˈton/

Noun

canton n (plural cantoane)

  1. canton

Declension

Derived terms

  • cantonal

Further reading

  • canton in DEX online – Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

Venetian

Noun

canton m (plural cantoni)

  1. corner

Derived terms

  • cantonzsin

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