billet vs note what difference

what is difference between billet and note

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, General American) IPA(key): /ˈbɪlɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪlɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English bylet, from Anglo-Norman billette (list, schedule), from bille +‎ -ette, from Latin bulla (document).

Noun

billet (plural billets)

  1. A short informal letter.
  2. A written order to quarter soldiers.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle French billette (schedule), from bullette, diminutive form of bulle (document), from Medieval Latin bulla, hence cognate with etymology 1 above.

Noun

billet (plural billets)

  1. A place where a soldier is assigned to lodge.
    • 1997, Chris Horrocks, Introducing Foucault, page 9 (Totem Books, Icon Books; →ISBN
      17 June 1940: Prime Minister Pétain requests armistice. Germans use the Foucaults’ holiday home as officers’ billet. Foucault steals firewood for school from collaborationist militia. Foucault does well at school, but messes up his summer exams in 1940.
  2. Temporary lodgings in a private residence, such as is organised for members of a visiting sports team.
  3. An allocated space or berth in a boat or ship.
  4. (figuratively) Berth; position.
    • 1897, Pall Mall Magazine
      His shafts of satire fly straight to their billet, and there they rankle.

Verb

billet (third-person singular simple present billets, present participle billeting or billetting, simple past and past participle billeted or billetted)

  1. (transitive, of a householder etc.) To lodge soldiers, or guests, usually by order.
    • Billeted in so antiquated a mansion.
  2. (intransitive, of a soldier) To lodge, or be quartered, in a private house.
  3. (transitive) To direct, by a ticket or note, where to lodge.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English billet, bylet, belet, billette, from Old French billette, from bille (log, tree trunk), from Vulgar Latin *bilia, probably of Gaulish origin (compare Old Irish bile (tree)).

Noun

billet (plural billets)

  1. (metallurgy) A semi-finished length of metal.
  2. A short piece of wood, especially one used as firewood.
  3. A short cutting of sugar cane produced by a harvester or used for planting.
  4. (heraldry) A rectangle used as a charge on an escutcheon.
  5. (architecture) An ornament in Norman work, resembling a billet of wood, either square or round.
  6. (saddlery) A strap that enters a buckle.
  7. A loop that receives the end of a buckled strap.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
Translations

Etymology 4

Noun

billet (plural billets)

  1. Alternative form of billard (coalfish)

Anagrams

  • LIBlet, Litbel

Danish

Etymology

From French billet.

Noun

billet c (singular definite billetten, plural indefinite billetter)

  1. ticket (admission to entertainment, pass for transportation)

Inflection

Further reading

  • “billet” in Den Danske Ordbog

French

Etymology

From Old French billette, from Latin bulla. See French boulette.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bi.jɛ/

Noun

billet m (plural billets)

  1. ticket
  2. note, a brief message
  3. (short for billet de banque) banknote

Derived terms

  • distributeur de billets

Related terms

  • billet de banque (bank note)
  • billet-doux
  • billette
  • billetterie
  • billetiste

Descendants

Further reading

  • “billet” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /nəʊt/
  • (General American) enPR: nōt, IPA(key): /noʊt/
  • Rhymes: -əʊt

Etymology 1

From Middle English note, from Old English not, nōt (note, mark, sign) and Old French note (letter, note), both from Latin nota (mark, sign, remark, note).

Noun

note (countable and uncountable, plural notes)

  1. (heading) A symbol or annotation.
    1. A mark or token by which a thing may be known; a visible sign; a character; a distinctive mark or feature; a characteristic quality.
      • 1841, John Henry Newman, “A Letter to the Right Reverend Father in God, Richard, Lord Bishop of Oxford, on Occasion of No. 90, in the Series Called The Tracts for the Times”, Oxford: John Henry Parker, page 39:
        She [the Anglican church] has the Note of possession, the Note of freedom from party-titles ; the Note of life, a tough life and a vigorous ; she has ancient descent, unbroken continuance, agreement in doctrine with the ancient Church.
    2. A mark, or sign, made to call attention, to point out something to notice, or the like; a sign, or token, proving or giving evidence.
    3. A brief remark; a marginal comment or explanation; hence, an annotation on a text or author; a comment; a critical, explanatory, or illustrative observation.
  2. (heading) A written or printed communication or commitment.
    1. A brief piece of writing intended to assist the memory; a memorandum; a minute.
    2. A short informal letter; a billet.
    3. (academic) An academic treatise (often without regard to length); a treatment; a discussion paper; (loosely) any contribution to an academic discourse.
    4. A diplomatic missive or written communication.
    5. (finance) A written or printed paper acknowledging a debt, and promising payment
    6. (obsolete) A list of items or of charges; an account.
    7. A piece of paper money; a banknote.
      Synonym: bill
    8. (extension) A small size of paper used for writing letters or notes.
  3. (music, heading) A sound.
    1. A character, variously formed, to indicate the length of a tone, and variously placed upon the staff to indicate its pitch.
    2. A musical sound; a tone; an utterance; a tune.
    3. (by extension) A key of the piano or organ.
    4. (by extension) A call or song of a bird.
  4. (uncountable) Observation; notice; heed.
  5. (uncountable) Reputation; distinction.
  6. A critical comment.
  7. (obsolete) Notification; information; intelligence.
  8. (obsolete) Mark of disgrace.
Synonyms
  • (mark of disgrace): blemish, blot, brand, reproach, stain, stigma, taint
  • (observation, notice, heed): attention, mark; see also Thesaurus:attention
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

note (third-person singular simple present notes, present participle noting, simple past and past participle noted)

  1. (transitive) To notice with care; to observe; to remark; to heed.
  2. (transitive) To record in writing; to make a memorandum of.
  3. (transitive) To denote; to designate.
  4. (transitive) To annotate.
  5. (transitive) To set down in musical characters.
  6. (transitive, law) To record on the back of (a bill, draft, etc.) a refusal of acceptance, as the ground of a protest, which is done officially by a notary.
    • 2020 October 28, Kimberly Budd for the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, case SJC-12769:
      By noting the protest, notaries could date certificates when they were received, making it easier to comply with time restrictions associated with protesting.
Derived terms
  • note down
Translations

See also

  • notable
  • noteless
  • benote

Etymology 2

From Middle English note (use, usefulness, profit), from Old English notu (use, enjoyment, advantage, profit, utility), from Proto-Germanic *nutō (enjoyment, utilisation), from Proto-Indo-European *newd- (to acquire, make use of). Cognate with West Frisian not (yield, produce, crop), Dutch genot (enjoyment, pleasure), Dutch nut (usefulness, utility, behoof), German Nutzen (benefit, usefulness, utility), Icelandic not (use, noun). Related also to Old English notian (to enjoy, make use of, employ), Old English nēotan (to use, enjoy), Old High German niozan (to use, enjoy), Modern German benutzen (to use). Related to nait.

Alternative forms

  • noit, noyt (Northern England)
  • not (Shetland)

Noun

note (usually uncountable, plural notes)

  1. (uncountable, Britain dialectal, Northern England, Ireland, Scotland) That which is needed or necessary; business; duty; work.
    • 1897 May 27, Halifax Courier, quoted in 1903, Joseph Wright, English Dialect Dictionary, volume IV, London: Henry Frowde, page 302:
      Tha’ll keep me at this noit all day… Om always at this noit.
    • 1962, Arthur C. Cawley, Everyman, and Medieval Miracle Plays[2], page 125:
      Thou canst do thy note; that have I espied.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Ireland, Scotland) The giving of milk by a cow or sow; the period following calving or farrowing during which a cow or sow is at her most useful (i.e. gives milk); the milk given by a cow or sow during such a period.
    • 1843, The Farmer’s Magazine, page 384:
      The supply of horned cattle at this fair was great, but the business done was confined to fleshy barreners of feeding qualities and superior new-calved heifers, and those at early note, with appearance of being useful; […]
    • 1875, Belfast Paper:
      For sale, a Kerry cow, five years old, at her note in May.
    • 1922, P. MacGill, Lanty Hanlon page 11:
      A man who drank spring water when his one cow was near note.

Further reading

  • note in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • note in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.
  • note, A Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, Volume 2, Halliwell, 1860.

Anagrams

  • ETNO, Eton, Teno, Tone, ento-, teno-, tone

Afrikaans

Noun

note

  1. plural of noot

Danish

Etymology 1

From English note, from Italian nota, from Latin nota.

Noun

note c (singular definite noten, plural indefinite noter)

  1. note
    Synonyms: notat, notits
Inflection

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb

note

  1. (mechanics) To supply a board to a groove.
Conjugation

Template:da-conj-base


French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin nota.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɔt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Noun

note f (plural notes)

  1. note (written or spoken)
  2. mark (UK), grade (US)
  3. bill (UK, US), check (US)
  4. (music) note
  5. touch, hint, note

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Turkish: not

Verb

note

  1. inflection of noter:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

  • “note” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Galician

Verb

note

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of notar

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈnɔ.te/

Adjective

note

  1. feminine plural of noto

Noun

note f

  1. plural of nota

Anagrams

  • Neto, ento-, etno-, onte

Latin

Participle

nōte

  1. vocative masculine singular of nōtus

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch *nutu, from Proto-Germanic *hnuts.

Noun

nōte f

  1. nut (fruit)

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Dutch: noot
  • Limburgish: noeat (with unexpected oea)

Further reading

  • “note (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “note (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I

Middle English

Etymology 1

Noun

note

  1. note

Etymology 2

Adverb

note

  1. Alternative form of not

Norman

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

note f (plural notes)

  1. (Jersey) tune

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin nota

Noun

note m (definite singular noten, indefinite plural noter, definite plural notene)

  1. (music) a note
  2. a note in a book or text
  3. a note (communication between governments)
  4. a banknote

Derived terms

  • fotnote

References

  • “note” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • -onet, toen, tone

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Latin nota

Noun

note m (definite singular noten, indefinite plural notar, definite plural notane)

  1. (music) a note
  2. a note in a book or text
  3. a note (communication between governments)
  4. a banknote
Derived terms
  • fotnote

Etymology 2

Verb

note

  1. past participle of nyta

References

  • “note” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈnowt͡ʃ/, /ˈnɔt͡ʃ/

Noun

note m (plural notes)

  1. (computing) Clipping of notebook (notebook computer).

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈnɔ.t͡ʃi/

Verb

note

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of notar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of notar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of notar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of notar

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈnote]

Noun

note f pl

  1. plural of notă

Scots

Alternative forms

  • not, noit, noyt

Etymology 1

From Middle English not, note, noote, from Old English notu (use; utility; benefit), from Proto-Germanic *nutō (use; enjoyment). More at note.

Noun

note (uncountable)

  1. use; benefit
  2. necessity; occasion
  3. business; employment
  4. task; duty
  5. purpose; function; office

Etymology 2

From Middle English noten, notien, from Old English notian (to make use of; employ; enjoy), from Proto-Germanic *nutōną (to make use of; enjoy).

Verb

note (third-person singular present notes, present participle notin, past nott, past participle nott or notten)

  1. To use; employ; make use of
  2. To need

Spanish

Verb

note

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of notar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of notar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of notar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of notar.

Venetian

Alternative forms

  • not

Etymology

From Latin noctem, accusative of nox (compare Italian notte), from Proto-Indo-European *nókʷts.

Noun

note f (plural noti)

  1. night

Yola

Etymology

From Middle English noot, contraction of ne +‎ woot.

Verb

note

  1. I do not know.

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial