billow vs surge what difference

what is difference between billow and surge

English

Etymology

From Middle English *bilowe, *bilewe, *bilwe, *bilȝe, borrowed from Old Norse bylgja, from Proto-Germanic *bulgijō. Cognates include Danish bølge, Norwegian Bokmål bølge, Norwegian Nynorsk bylgje, Middle High German bulga and Low German bulge.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɪləʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈbɪloʊ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪləʊ

Noun

billow (plural billows)

  1. A large wave, swell, surge, or undulating mass of something, such as water, smoke, fabric or sound
    • 1782, William Cowper, “Expostulation”, in Poems by William Cowper, of the Inner Temple, Esq..
      [] Whom the winds waft where’er the billows roll, / From the world’s girdle to the frozen pole;
    • 1842, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, “The Wreck of the Hesperus”, in Ballads and Other Poems.
    • 1873, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, “The Brook and the Wave” in Birds of Passage:
      And the brooklet has found the billow / Though they flowed so far apart.
    • 1893 August, Rudyard Kipling, “Seal Lullaby”, in “The White Seal”, National Review.

Translations

Verb

billow (third-person singular simple present billows, present participle billowing, simple past and past participle billowed)

  1. To surge or roll in billows.
    • 1942, Emily Carr, The Book of Small, “Chain Gang,”[1]
      The nuns’ veils billowed and flapped behind the snaky line of girls as if the sisters were shooing the serpent from the Garden of Eden.
  2. To swell out or bulge.

Translations

References



English

Etymology

From Middle English surgen, possibly from Middle French sourgir, from Old French surgir (to rise, ride near the shore, arrive, land), from Old Catalan surgir, from Latin surgō, contraction of surrigō, subrigō (lift up, raise, erect; intransitive rise, arise, get up, spring up, grow, etc., transitive verb), from sub (from below; up) + regō (to stretch), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃réǵeti (to straighten; right), from the root *h₃reǵ-; see regent.

Pronunciation

  • (US) enPR: sûrj IPA(key): /sɝdʒ/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /sɜːdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)dʒ
  • Homophone: serge

Noun

surge (plural surges)

  1. A sudden transient rush, flood or increase.
  2. The maximum amplitude of a vehicle’s forward/backward oscillation.
  3. (electricity) A sudden electrical spike or increase of voltage and current.
  4. (aviation) A momentary reversal of the airflow through the compressor section of a jet engine due to disruption of the airflow entering the engine’s air intake, accompanied by loud banging noises, emission of flame, and temporary loss of thrust.
  5. (nautical) The swell or heave of the sea (FM 55-501).
    • 1901, Bible (American Standard Version), James i. 6
      He that doubteth is like the surge of the sea driven by the wind and tossed.
    • He flies aloft, and, with impetuous roar, / Pursues the foaming surges to the shore.
  6. (obsolete) A spring; a fountain.
    • 1523-1525, John Bourchier, 2nd Baron Berners, Froissart’s Chronicles
      all great rivers are gorged and assembled of various surges and springs of water
  7. The tapered part of a windlass barrel or a capstan, upon which the cable surges, or slips.

Synonyms

  • inrush

Derived terms

  • countersurge
  • surgeless

Translations

Verb

surge (third-person singular simple present surges, present participle surging, simple past and past participle surged)

  1. (intransitive) To rush, flood, or increase suddenly.
  2. To accelerate forwards, particularly suddenly.
  3. (intransitive, aviation, of a jet engine) To experience a momentary reversal of airflow through the compressor section due to disruption of intake airflow.
  4. (transitive, nautical) To slack off a line.

Related terms

  • source

Translations

References

  • surge in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • surge in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • FM 55-501

Anagrams

  • Ruges, grues, urges

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsur.d͡ʒe/
  • Rhymes: -urdʒe

Verb

surge

  1. third-person singular present indicative of surgere

Anagrams

  • Serug

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈsur.ɡe/, [ˈs̠ʊɾɡɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈsur.d͡ʒe/, [ˈsurd͡ʒɛ]

Verb

surge

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of surgō
    • (Matt. IX. v.5)

Arise, and walk. (KJV)


Portuguese

Verb

surge

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of surgir
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of surgir

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsuɾxe/, [ˈsuɾ.xe]

Verb

surge

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of surgir.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of surgir.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of surgir.

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