bind vs truss what difference

what is difference between bind and truss

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /baɪnd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd

Etymology

From Middle English binden, from Old English bindan, from Proto-West Germanic *bindan, from Proto-Germanic *bindaną (compare West Frisian bine, Dutch binden, Low German binnen, German binden, Danish binde), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰéndʰ-e-ti, from *bʰendʰ- (to tie)

Compare Welsh benn (cart), Latin offendīx (knot, band), Lithuanian beñdras (partner), Albanian bend (servant, henchman), Ancient Greek πεῖσμα (peîsma, cable, rope), Persian بستن(bastan, to bind), Sanskrit बन्धति (bándhati). Doublet of bandana.

Verb

bind (third-person singular simple present binds, present participle binding, simple past bound, past participle bound or (archaic, rare) bounden)

  1. (intransitive) To tie; to confine by any ligature.
  2. (intransitive) To cohere or stick together in a mass.
    • unlocks their [clay’s] binding Quality.
  3. (intransitive) To be restrained from motion, or from customary or natural action, as by friction.
  4. (intransitive) To exert a binding or restraining influence.
  5. (transitive) To tie or fasten tightly together, with a cord, band, ligature, chain, etc.
    Synonyms: fetter, make fast, tie, fasten, restrain
  6. (transitive) To confine, restrain, or hold by physical force or influence of any kind.
  7. (transitive) To couple.
  8. (figuratively) To oblige, restrain, or hold, by authority, law, duty, promise, vow, affection, or other social tie.
    Synonyms: restrain, restrict, obligate
  9. (law) To put (a person) under definite legal obligations, especially, under the obligation of a bond or covenant.
  10. (law) To place under legal obligation to serve.
    Synonym: indenture
  11. (transitive) To protect or strengthen by applying a band or binding, as the edge of a carpet or garment.
  12. (transitive, archaic) To make fast (a thing) about or upon something, as by tying; to encircle with something.
  13. (transitive) To cover, as with a bandage.
    Synonyms: bandage, dress
  14. (transitive, archaic) To prevent or restrain from customary or natural action, as by producing constipation.
  15. (transitive) To put together in a cover, as of books.
  16. (transitive, chemistry) To make two or more elements stick together.
  17. (transitive, programming) To associate an identifier with a value; to associate a variable name, method name, etc. with the content of a storage location.
    • 2008, Bryan O’Sullivan, John Goerzen, Donald Bruce Stewart, Real World Haskell (page 33)
      We bind the variable n to the value 2, and xs to "abcd".
  18. (transitive, programming) To process one or more object modules into an executable program.
  19. (Britain, dialect) To complain; to whine about something.
  20. (intransitive, LGBT) To wear a binder so as to flatten one’s chest to give the appearance of a flat chest, usually done by trans men.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

bind (plural binds)

  1. That which binds or ties.
  2. A troublesome situation; a problem; a predicament or quandary.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:difficult situation
  3. Any twining or climbing plant or stem, especially a hop vine; a bine.
  4. (music) A ligature or tie for grouping notes.
  5. (chess) A strong grip or stranglehold on a position that is difficult for the opponent to break.
  6. The indurated clay of coal mines.

Derived terms

  • bindweed

References

  • bind at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • bind in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • bind in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • INBD

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *bind-, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeydʰ- (to persuade, encourage; constrain). Cognate to Ancient Greek πείθω (peíthō, to persuade, convince), Illyrian *Bindus (Illyrian Neptune) and Thracian Bithus (Bithus, theonym).

Verb

bind (first-person singular past tense binda, participle bindur)

  1. to convince, persuade, amaze
  2. (archaic or chiefly dialectal) to perform magic, cast a spell, wonder, dazzle

Conjugation

Related terms

  • be
  • përbindësh

References


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪnt

Verb

bind

  1. first-person singular present indicative of binden
  2. imperative of binden

Faroese

Etymology

From the verb binda.

Noun

bind n (genitive singular binds, plural bind)

  1. a book binding
  2. a book jacket or cover
  3. a book band
  4. a volume (single book of a publication)
  5. a bandage
  6. armlet, brassard
  7. a sanitary napkin (US) or sanitary towel (UK)
  8. truss

Declension


German

Verb

bind

  1. singular imperative of binden
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of binden

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

Etymology 1

From the verb binde

Noun

bind n (definite singular bindet, indefinite plural bind, definite plural binda or bindene)

  1. a volume (single book of a published work)
  2. a sling (kind of hanging bandage)
    Han går med armen i bind
  3. a sanitary napkin (US) or sanitary towel (UK)
Derived terms
  • armbind
  • supplementsbind

Etymology 2

Verb

bind

  1. imperative of binde

References

  • “bind” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • bd. (abbreviation)

Etymology

From the verb binde.

Noun

bind n (definite singular bindet, indefinite plural bind, definite plural binda)

  1. a sanitary napkin (US) or sanitary towel (UK)
  2. a volume
    1. a bound book
    2. a single book in a multi-book format
    3. binding of a book
      Synonym: omslag
  3. a sling (kind of hanging bandage)

Derived terms

  • armbind
  • supplementsbind
  • References

    • “bind” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

    Swedish

    Verb

    bind

    1. imperative of binda.

    Wolof

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /bind/

    Verb

    bind

    1. to write
      Jàngalekat jaa ngiy bind. – The teacher (here) is writing.


    English

    Etymology

    From Old French trousse. Doublet of trousse.

    Pronunciation

    • (UK, US) IPA(key): /tɹʌs/
    • Rhymes: -ʌs

    Noun

    truss (plural trusses)

    1. A bandage and belt used to hold a hernia in place.
    2. (architecture) A structure made up of one or more triangular units made from straight beams of wood or metal, which is used to support a structure as in a roof or bridge.
    3. (architecture) A triangular bracket.
    4. An old English farming measurement. One truss of straw equalled 36 pounds, a truss of old hay equalled 56 pounds, a truss of new hay equalled 60 pounds, and 36 trusses equalled one load.
    5. (obsolete) A bundle; a package.
      • bearing a truss of trifles at his back
    6. (historical) A padded jacket or dress worn under armour, to protect the body from the effects of friction.
      • Puts off his palmer’s weed unto his truss, which bore / The stains of ancient arms.
    7. (historical) Part of a woman’s dress; a stomacher.
    8. (botany) A tuft of flowers formed at the top of the main stem of certain plants.
    9. (nautical) The rope or iron used to keep the centre of a yard to the mast.
    Derived terms

    Translations

    Verb

    truss (third-person singular simple present trusses, present participle trussing, simple past and past participle trussed)

    1. (transitive) To tie up a bird before cooking it.
    2. (transitive) To secure or bind with ropes.
    3. (transitive) To support.
    4. To take fast hold of; to seize and hold firmly; to pounce upon.
    5. To strengthen or stiffen, as a beam or girder, by means of a brace or braces.
    6. (slang, archaic) To execute by hanging; to hang; usually with up.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)

    Derived terms

    • trussed up

    Translations

    Anagrams

    • Rusts, rusts, sturs

    Latgalian

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Belarusian трусь (trusʹ). Cognates include Latvian trusis and Lithuanian triušis.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /trusʲː/

    Noun

    truss m

    1. rabbit

    Declension

    References

    • Nicole Nau (2011) A short grammar of Latgalian, München: LINCOM GmbH, →ISBN, page 23

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