binge vs glut what difference

what is difference between binge and glut

English

Etymology

From Lincolnshire and Northamptonshire dialect, binge (to soak), of unknown origin. Compare dialectal English beene and beam (to cure leakage in a tub or barrel by soaking, thereby causing the wood to swell).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪndʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪndʒ

Noun

binge (plural binges)

  1. A short period of excessive consumption, especially of food, alcohol, narcotics, etc.
  2. (by extension) A short period of an activity done in excess, such as watching a television show.

Synonyms

  • (period of excessive consumption, especially of alcohol): bender, jag, spree, toot, debauch

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

binge (third-person singular simple present binges, present participle binging or bingeing, simple past and past participle binged)

  1. To engage in a short period of excessive consumption, especially of excessive alcohol consumption.

Derived terms

  • binge and purge

Translations

References

  • Wright, Joseph (1898) The English Dialect Dictionary[1], volume 1, Oxford: Oxford University Press, page 269

See also

  • binge on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Bengi, begin, being, beïng

Swedish

Noun

binge c

  1. (partitioned off) storage area, container
  2. (slang) bed
  3. pile (of goods, usually grains)

Declension


English

Etymology

From Middle English glotien, from Old French gloter, glotir (compare French engloutir (to devour), glouton (glutton)), from Latin gluttiō, gluttīre (I swallow). Akin to Russian глотать (glotatʹ, to swallow).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlʌt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌt

Noun

glut (plural gluts)

  1. An excess, too much.
    Synonyms: excess, overabundance, plethora, slew, surfeit, surplus
    Antonyms: lack, shortage
  2. That which is swallowed.
  3. Something that fills up an opening.
    Synonym: clog
  4. A wooden wedge used in splitting blocks.
  5. (mining) A piece of wood used to fill up behind cribbing or tubbing.
  6. (bricklaying) A bat, or small piece of brick, used to fill out a course.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  7. (architecture) An arched opening to the ashpit of a kiln.
  8. A block used for a fulcrum.
  9. The broad-nosed eel (Anguilla anguilla, syn. Anguilla latirostris), found in Europe, Asia, the West Indies, etc.

Related terms

  • glutton
  • gluttony

Translations

Verb

glut (third-person singular simple present gluts, present participle glutting, simple past and past participle glutted)

  1. (transitive) To fill to capacity; to satisfy all demand or requirement; to sate.
  2. (intransitive) To eat gluttonously or to satiety.

Translations

References


Polish

Etymology

From Latin glūten.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlut/

Noun

glut m inan

  1. (colloquial) goo (semi-solid substance)
  2. (colloquial) booger (mucus)
    Synonyms: gil, smark, śpik

Declension

Further reading

  • glut in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • glut in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Volapük

Etymology

Borrowed from German Glut.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlut/

Noun

glut (nominative plural gluts)

  1. glow

Declension

Derived terms

  • glutik
  • glutön

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