binge vs splurge what difference

what is difference between binge and splurge

English

Etymology

From Lincolnshire and Northamptonshire dialect, binge (to soak), of unknown origin. Compare dialectal English beene and beam (to cure leakage in a tub or barrel by soaking, thereby causing the wood to swell).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪndʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪndʒ

Noun

binge (plural binges)

  1. A short period of excessive consumption, especially of food, alcohol, narcotics, etc.
  2. (by extension) A short period of an activity done in excess, such as watching a television show.

Synonyms

  • (period of excessive consumption, especially of alcohol): bender, jag, spree, toot, debauch

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

binge (third-person singular simple present binges, present participle binging or bingeing, simple past and past participle binged)

  1. To engage in a short period of excessive consumption, especially of excessive alcohol consumption.

Derived terms

  • binge and purge

Translations

References

  • Wright, Joseph (1898) The English Dialect Dictionary[1], volume 1, Oxford: Oxford University Press, page 269

See also

  • binge on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Bengi, begin, being, beïng

Swedish

Noun

binge c

  1. (partitioned off) storage area, container
  2. (slang) bed
  3. pile (of goods, usually grains)

Declension


English

Etymology

Possibly from a blend of splash +‎ surge.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /splɝdʒ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /splɜːdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)dʒ

Verb

splurge (third-person singular simple present splurges, present participle splurging, simple past and past participle splurged)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, informal) To (cause to) gush; to flow or move in a rush.
    The tomato sauce was splurged all over the chips.
    • 1884, Donald Grant Mitchell, Bound Together, A Sheaf of Papers, Norwich, 1659-1859,
      But the steamboats come in their time ; and I am sure that I address a large crowd of sympathizing auditors, now that I come to speak of the magnificent old “Fanny,” spluttering and paddling, and splurging up to the little wharf under the lea of Peppers Hill, where the pine wood lay piled in fabulous quantities.
    • 1913, Edith Wharton, The Custom of the Country, Chapter XXXVIII,
      She waited a moment, quivering with the expectation of her husband’s answer; then, as none came except the silent darkening of his face, she walked to the door and turned round to fling back: “Of course you can do what you like with your own house, and make any arrangements that suit your family, without consulting me; but you needn’t think I’m ever going back to live in that stuffy little hole, with Hubert and his wife splurging round on top of our heads!”
    • 1930, Robert E. Howard, Sailors’ Grudge,
      “And boy,” he splurged, “we are filming a peach, a pip and a wow! Is it a knockout? Oh, baby! A prize-fight picture entitled ‘The Honor of the Champion,’ starring Reginald Van Veer, with Honey Precious for the herowine. Boy, will it pack the theayters!”
  2. (colloquial) To spend lavishly or extravagantly, especially money. [from 1911]
    They decided to splurge on the biggest banana split for dessert.
    • 1912, Jack London, The House of Pride.
      I could see Schultz think, and revive, and splurge with his bets again.
  3. To produce an extravagant or ostentatious display.

Translations

Noun

splurge (plural splurges)

  1. An extravagant or ostentatious display. [from 1828]
  2. An extravagant indulgence; a spending spree. [from 1928]

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • gulpers, preslug, replugs

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