biogenesis vs biogeny what difference

what is difference between biogenesis and biogeny

English

Etymology

From Ancient Greek βῐ́ος (bíos, life) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gʷeyh₃- (to live)) + γένεσις (génesis, origin, source; manner of birth; creation) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénh₁tis (birth; production)). The words biogenesis and abiogenesis were both coined by English biologist Thomas Henry Huxley (1825–1895) in 1870 (see the quotation).

The word biogenesis was first used by English physiologist and neurologist Henry Charlton Bastian (1837–1915) around 1869 to mean “life-origination or commencement” in an unpublished exchange of correspondence with Irish physicist John Tyndall. However, in an 1871 book, Bastian announced he was adopting a new term, archebiosis, because of the confusion that might be caused by Huxley’s use of biogenesis with a different meaning.

Equivalent to bio- +‎ genesis.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bʌɪə(ʊ)ˈdʒɛnəsɪs/, /baɪə-/, /baɪoʊ-/, /biːə-/, /biːoʊ-/, /-nɪ-/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˌbaioʊˈdʒɛnəsɪs/
  • Hyphenation: bi‧o‧ge‧ne‧sis

Noun

biogenesis (usually uncountable, plural biogeneses)

  1. The principle that living organisms are produced only from other living organisms.
  2. Biosynthesis.

Antonyms

  • (principle that living organisms are produced only from other living organisms): abiogenesis

Translations

References

Further reading

  • biogenesis on Wikipedia.Wikipedia


English

Etymology

From bio- +‎ -geny.

Noun

biogeny (uncountable)

  1. biogenesis

Anagrams

  • obeying

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