bird vs hiss what difference

what is difference between bird and hiss

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: bû(r)d, IPA(key): /bɜːd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɝd/, [bɝɖ]
    • (NYC) IPA(key): [bɔɪd]
  • (Indian English) IPA(key): /bɜd/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)d

Etymology 1

From Middle English brid, from Old English bird, brid, bridd (young bird, chick), of uncertain origin and relation. Gradually replaced fowl as the most common term starting in the 14th century.

The “booing/jeering” and “vulgar hand gesture” senses derived from the expression “to give the big bird”, as in “to hiss someone like a goose”, dated in the mid‐18th Century.

Noun

bird (plural birds)

  1. A member of the class of animals Aves in the phylum Chordata, characterized by being warm-blooded, having feathers and wings usually capable of flight, having a beaked mouth, and laying eggs.
    • 2004, Bruce Whittington, Loucas Raptis, Seasons with Birds, page 50:
      The level below this is called the Phylum; birds belong to the Phylum Chordata, which includes all the vertebrate animals (the sub-phylum Vertebrata) and a few odds and ends.
  2. (slang) A man, fellow. [from the mid-19th c.]
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, page 24:
      The door opened and a tall hungry-looking bird with a cane and a big nose came in neatly, shut the door behind him against the pressure of the door closer, marched over to the desk and placed a wrapped parcel on the desk.
    • 2006, Jeff Fields, Terry Kay, A cry of angels
      “Ah, he’s a funny bird,” said Phaedra, throwing a leg over the sill.
  3. (Britain, US, Australia, slang) A girl or woman, especially one considered sexually attractive.
    • 1809, Thomas Campbell, Lord Ullin’s Daughter
      And by my word! the bonny bird / In danger shall not tarry.
    • 2013, Russell Brand, Russell Brand and the GQ awards: ‘It’s amazing how absurd it seems’ (in The Guardian, 13 September 2013)[2]
      The usual visual grammar was in place – a carpet in the street, people in paddocks awaiting a brush with something glamorous, blokes with earpieces, birds in frocks of colliding colours that if sighted in nature would indicate the presence of poison.
    • 2017, David Weigel, The Show That Never Ends: The Rise and Fall of Prog Rock, W. W. Norton & Company.
  4. (Britain, Ireland, slang) Girlfriend. [from the early 20th c.]
  5. (slang) An airplane.
  6. (slang) A satellite.
    • 1988, Satellite communications. Jan-Oct. 1988
      Deployment of the fourth bird “should ensure that Inmarsat has sufficient capacity in orbit in the early 1990s, taking into account the possibility of launch failures and the age of some of the spacecraft in the Inmarsat first generation system
    • 1992, Cable Vision
      Will a government- backed APSTAR satellite knock out a planned AsiaSat II bird?
    • 2015, John Fuller, Thor’s Legions: Weather Support to the U.S. Air Force and Army, 1937-1987, Springer →ISBN, page 384
      In reality, the Air Force was never able to place a bird in orbit that quickly.
  7. (obsolete) A chicken; the young of a fowl; a young eaglet; a nestling.
    • 1494–1536, William Tyndale, Bible, Matthew 8:20
      The brydds [birds] of the aier have nestes.
  8. (Britain, with definite article, especially in expressions such as ‘give someone the bird’) Booing and jeering, especially as done by an audience expressing displeasure at a performer.
  9. (with definite article) The vulgar hand gesture in which the middle finger is extended.
    Synonym: the finger
    • 2002, The Advocate, “Flying fickle finger of faith”, page 55.
      For whatever reason — and there are so many to chose from — they flipped the bird in the direction of the tinted windows of the Bushmobile.
    • 2003, James Patterson and Peter De Jonge, The Beach House, Warner Books, page 305,
      Then she raised both hands above her shoulders and flipped him the bird with each one.
  10. A yardbird.
Synonyms
  • (member of class Aves): fowl, avian
  • (man): chap, bloke, guy
  • (woman): broad, chick, dame, girl, lass
  • See also Thesaurus:woman
  • See also Thesaurus:girl
Hyponyms
  • See also Thesaurus:bird
Derived terms
Translations

See also

  • birb
  • burd
  • chirp
  • ornithic
  • ornithology
  • squawk
  • tweet
  • Appendix: Animals
  • Appendix:Gestures/middle finger

Verb

bird (third-person singular simple present birds, present participle birding, simple past and past participle birded)

  1. (intransitive) To observe or identify wild birds in their natural environment.
  2. (intransitive) To catch or shoot birds.
  3. (intransitive, figuratively) To seek for game or plunder; to thieve.
    • These day-owls. That are birding in men’s purses

Etymology 2

Originally Cockney rhyming slang, shortened from bird-lime for “time”.

Noun

bird (plural birds)

  1. (slang, uncountable) A prison sentence.
Synonyms
  • (prison sentence): porridge, stretch, time
Translations

Verb

bird (third-person singular simple present birds, present participle birding, simple past and past participle birded)

  1. (transitive, slang) To bring into prison, to roof.
Translations

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “bird”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • bird on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Aves on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons
  • Aves on Wikispecies.Wikispecies
  • bird at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • drib


English

Etymology

From Middle English hissen, probably of onomatopoeic origin. Compare Middle Dutch hissen, hisschen.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɪs/
  • Rhymes: -ɪs

Noun

hiss (plural hisses)

  1. A sibilant sound, such as that made by a snake or escaping steam; an unvoiced fricative.
    • c. 1590, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 2, Act III, Scene 2,[1]
      Their music frightful as the serpent’s hiss,
      And boding screech-owls make the concert full!
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 6, lines 212-213,[2]
      [] over head the dismal hiss
      Of fiery Darts in flaming volies flew,
    • 1717, John Dryden (translator), Ovid’s Metamorphoses, London: Jacob Tonson, Book 13, “The Story of Acis, Polyphemus and Galatea,” p. ,[3]
      A hundred Reeds, of a prodigious Growth,
      Scarce made a Pipe, proportion’d to his Mouth:
      Which, when he gave it Wind, the Rocks around,
      And watry Plains, the dreadful Hiss resound.
    • 1874, Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd, Chapter 31,[4]
      [] his form was soon covered over by the twilight as his footsteps mixed in with the low hiss of the leafy trees.
    • 1951, William Styron, Lie Down in Darkness, New York: Vintage, 1992, Chapter 6, p. 292,[5]
      Her voice was a hiss, like gas escaping from a bottle of soda.
  2. An expression of disapproval made using such a sound.
    • 1583, John Foxe, Acts and Monuments, Volume 2, Part 2, London: John Day, 4th edition, “The Oration of Byshop Brookes in closing vp this examination agaynst Doctour Cranmer Archbishop of Caunterbury,” p. 1878,[6]
      [] in open disputations ye haue bene openly conuict, ye haue bene openly driuen out of the schole with hisses []
    • 1716, Joseph Addison, The Free-Holder, 16 April, 1716, London: D. Midwinter and J. Tonson, pp. 203-204,[7]
      The Actors, in the midst of an innocent old Play, are often startled with unexpected Claps or Hisses; and do not know whether they have been talking like good Subjects, or have spoken Treason.
    • 1869, Mark Twain, Innocents Abroad, Chapter 29,[8]
      Once or twice she was encored five and six times in succession, and received with hisses when she appeared, and discharged with hisses and laughter when she had finished—then instantly encored and insulted again!

Derived terms

  • hissy
  • plasmaspheric hiss

Translations

Verb

hiss (third-person singular simple present hisses, present participle hissing, simple past and past participle hissed)

  1. (intransitive) To make a hissing sound.
    As I started to poke it, the snake hissed at me.
    • 1567, Arthur Golding (translator), The XV. Bookes of P. Ouidius Naso, entytuled Metamorphosis, London: Willyam Seres, Book 12, p. 152,[9]
      And in his wound the seared blood did make a gréeuous sound,
      As when a peece of stéele red who tane vp with tongs is drownd
      In water by the smith, it spirts and hisseth in the trowgh.
    • 1797, Ann Ward Radcliffe, The Italian, London: T. Cadell Jun. & W. Davies, Volume 2, Chapter 7, p. 236,[10]
      The man came back, and said something in a lower voice, to which the other replied, “she sleeps,” or Ellena was deceived by the hissing consonants of some other words.
    • 1995, Rohinton Mistry, A Fine Balance, Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, Chapter 10, p. 487,[11]
      The frying pan hissed and sizzled as Ishvar gently slid ping-pong sized balls into the glistening oil.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To condemn or express contempt (for someone or something) by hissing.
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, Act I, Scene 2,[12]
      If the tag-rag people did not clap him and hiss him, according as he pleased and displeased them, as they use to do the players in the theatre, I am no true man.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Ezekiel 27.36,[13]
      The merchants among the people shall hiss at thee []
    • 1793, Elizabeth Inchbald, Every One Has His Fault, London: G.G.J. and J. Robinson, Prologue,[14]
      The Play, perhaps, has many things amiss:
      Well, let us then reduce the point to this,
      Let only those that have no failings, hiss.
    • 1803, Robert Charles Dallas, The History of the Maroons, London: Longman and Rees, Volume 1, Letter 5, p. 145,[15]
      As the culprits went through the town and plantations they were laughed at, hissed, and hooted by the slaves []
    • 1961, Walker Percy, The Moviegoer, New York: Ivy Books, 1988, Part 1, Chapter 4, p. 38,[16]
      How well I remember, her stepmother told her, the days when we Wagnerians used to hiss old Brahms—O for the rapturous rebellious days of youth.
  3. (transitive) To utter (something) with a hissing sound.
    • 1761, Robert Lloyd, An Epistle to C. Churchill, London: William Flexney, p. 7,[17]
      Lies oft o’erthrown with ceaseless Venom spread,
      Still hiss out Scandal from their Hydra Head,
    • 1855, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, “Maud” in Maud, and Other Poems, London: Moxon, p. 20,[18]
      [] the long-necked geese of the world that are ever hissing dispraise []
    • 2012, Hilary Mantel, Bring Up the Bodies, New York: Henry Holt, Part 2, “Master of Phantoms,”
      All day from the queen’s rooms, shouting, slamming doors, running feet: hissed conversations in undertones.
  4. (intransitive) To move with a hissing sound.
    The arrow hissed through the air.
    • 1718, Alexander Pope (translator), The Iliad of Homer, London: Bernard Lintott, Volume 4, Book 15, lines 690-691, p. 192,[20]
      The Troops of Troy recede with sudden Fear,
      While the swift Javelin hiss’d along in Air.
    • 1815, William Wordsworth, “Influence of Natural Objects” in Poems by William Wordsworth, London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Volume 1, p. 46,[21]
      All shod with steel
      We hissed along the polished ice []
    • 1891, Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, Chapter ,[22]
      All the preceding afternoon and night heavy thunderstorms had hissed down upon the meads, and washed some of the hay into the river []
    • 1997, Annie Proulx, “Brokeback Mountain” in Close Range: Brokeback Mountain and Other Stories, London: Harper Perennial, 2005, p. 283,[23]
      Ennis del Mar wakes before five, wind rocking the trailer, hissing in around the aluminum door and window frames.
  5. (transitive) To emit or eject (something) with a hissing sound.
    • 1938, Graham Greene, Brighton Rock, London: Heinemann, Part 2, Chapter 1, p. 72,[24]
      The man in white pyjamas hissed soda into his glass.
    • 1939, John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath, New York: Viking, Chapter 26, p. 500,[25]
      The radiator bubbled and hissed steam.
    • 1976, Ira Levin, The Boys from Brazil, New York: Dell, 1977, Part 1, p. 16,[26]
      He hissed air intently through a gap in his upper teeth.
  6. (transitive) To whisper, especially angrily or urgently.

Derived terms

  • boo hiss
  • hissable
  • hiss-and-tell
  • hisser
  • hissing hot

Translations

See also

  • hizz

Anagrams

  • IHSS, Shis

Azerbaijani

Etymology

Ultimately from Arabic حِسّ(ḥiss). Compare to Turkish his.

Noun

hiss (definite accusative hissi, plural hisslər)

  1. feeling, sensation
    Synonym: duyğu

Spelling notes

The final double consonant in Azerbaijani nouns is usually reduced in the locative and ablative singular and plural; hiss and küll are exceptions to this rule, as they would otherwise be confused with his and kül ( “Azərbaycan dilində hansı sözlərin yazılışının dəyişəcəyi açıqlanıb”, in Report.az[28], January 2018).

Declension

Derived terms

  • hiss etmək (to feel)

German

Pronunciation

Verb

hiss

  1. singular imperative of hissen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of hissen

Middle English

Pronoun

hiss

  1. Alternative form of his (his)

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From h +‎ -iss.

Noun

hiss m (definite singular hissen, indefinite plural hissar, definite plural hissane)

  1. (music) B-sharp

Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

hiss c

  1. elevator, lift

Declension

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