birl vs birle what difference

what is difference between birl and birle

English

Etymology 1

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɜːl/

Verb

birl (third-person singular simple present birls, present participle birling, simple past and past participle birled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, Scotland) To spin.
    • 1893, Robert Louis Stevenson, Catriona, Chapter XXII: Helvoetsluys,
      About nine in the morning, in a burst of wintry sun between two squalls of hail, I had my first look of Holland – a line of windmills birling in the breeze.
    • 1906, Neil Munro, The Vital Spark, reprinted in 1958, Para Handy Tales,
      “I’ll maybe no trouble you long, boys,” he moaned lugubriously. “My heid’s birling roond that fast that I canna even mind my own name two meenutes.”
  2. (transitive) To cause (a floating log) to rotate by treading on it.
    • 1903 April, Stewart Edward White, The Riverman, published in McClure’s Magazine, Volume 20,
      “That’s nothing!” my companion repressed me, “anybody can birl a log. Watch this.”
      Roaring Dick for the first time unfolded his arms. With some appearance of caution he balanced his unstable footing into absolute immobility. Then he turned a somersault.
  3. (transitive) To throw down a coin as one’s share in a joint contribution.

Noun

birl (plural birls)

  1. (music, bagpipes) A type of grace note movement that quickly switches between low-A and low-G several times, producing a low rippling sound.

References

Etymology 2

See birle.

Verb

birl (third-person singular simple present birls, present participle birling, simple past and past participle birled)

  1. Alternative form of birle (to drink, carouse)

Etymology 3

Blend of boy +‎ girl

Noun

birl (plural birls)

  1. (Internet slang, LGBT) A girl of boyish appearance.
    • 2013, David Buckingham, Rebekah Willett, Digital Generations: Children, Young People, and the New Media
      The birls forum describes itself as “a community dedicated to boyish/androgynous girls” with open borders such that “all people who don’t define themselves as birls are welcome as well, including femmes, bioboys, androgynes, and transguys … or you could just make up your own label for who you are” (Birls Live Journal, 2004).

Anagrams

  • bril


English

Alternative forms

  • birl, byrl

Etymology

From Middle English birlen, from Old English byrelian (to give or serve a drink to), from byrele (cup-bearer, steward, butler), from Proto-Germanic *burilijaz (carrier, manservant), from *burjô (descendant, son), from *beraną (to bear, carry). Related to Old English byre (son, offspring, youth). More at bear.

Verb

birle (third-person singular simple present birles, present participle birling, simple past and past participle birled)

  1. (Scotland, obsolete) To pour a drink (for).
    • c.1882-1898, Francis James Child (collector and editor), Child’s Ballads, Number 68: “Young Hunting”,
      She has birld in him Young Hunting / The good ale and the beer, / Till he was as fou drunken / As any wild-wood steer.
  2. (Scotland, obsolete) To drink deeply or excessively; carouse.
    • c.1882-1898, Francis James Child (collector and editor), Child’s Ballads, Number 73: “Lord Thomas and Fair Annet”,
      They birled, they birled at Annies[sic] wake / The white bread and the wine, / And ere the morn at that same time / At his they birled the same.

Anagrams

  • Erbil, Liber., liber, libre

Spanish

Verb

birle

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of birlar.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of birlar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of birlar.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial