bit vs chip what difference

what is difference between bit and chip

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bĭt, IPA(key): /bɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English bitte, bite, from Old English bita (bit; fragment; morsel) and bite (a bite; cut), from Proto-Germanic *bitô and *bitiz; both from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split).

Cognate with West Frisian bit, Saterland Frisian Bit, Dutch bit, German Low German Beet, Biet, German Biss and Bissen, Danish bid, Swedish bit, Icelandic biti.

Noun

bit (plural bits)

  1. A piece of metal placed in a horse’s mouth and connected to the reins to direct the animal.
  2. A rotary cutting tool fitted to a drill, used to bore holes.
  3. (dated, Britain) A coin of a specified value.
  4. (obsolete, Canada) A ten-cent piece, dime.
    • 1941, Emily Carr, Klee Wyck, Chapter 10, [3]
      The smallest coin we had in Canada in early days was a dime, worth ten cents. The Indians called this coin “a Bit“. Our next coin, double in buying power and in size, was a twenty-five cent piece and this the Indians called “Two Bits”.
  5. (now US) A unit of currency or coin in the Americas worth a fraction of a Spanish dollar; now specifically, an eighth of a US dollar.
    • 1789, Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative, vol. I, ch. 6:
      I trusted to the Lord to be with me; and at one of our trips to St. Eustatia, a Dutch island, I bought a glass tumbler with my half bit, and when I came to Montserrat I sold it for a bit, or sixpence.
  6. (historical, US) In the southern and southwestern states, a small silver coin (such as the real) formerly current; commonly, one worth about 12½ cents; also, the sum of 12½ cents.
  7. A small amount of something.
  8. (informal) Specifically, a small amount of time.
  9. (in the plural, informal, sports) Fractions of a second.
  10. A portion of something.
  11. Somewhat; something, but not very great; also used like jot and whit to express the smallest degree. See also a bit.
    • T. Hook
      My young companion was a bit of a poet.
  12. (slang) A prison sentence, especially a short one.
  13. An excerpt of material making up part of a show, comedy routine, etc.
  14. Short for bit part.
  15. The part of a key which enters the lock and acts upon the bolt and tumblers.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  16. The cutting iron of a plane.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  17. The bevelled front edge of an axehead along which the cutting edge runs.
Synonyms
  • (coin): coin, piece
  • (small piece): morsel (of food), piece, scrap
  • (portion): portion, share, segment
  • (horse equipment): snaffle, pelham, kimberwicke
  • (prison sentence): bid
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bit (third-person singular simple present bits, present participle bitting, simple past and past participle bitted)

  1. (transitive) To put a bridle upon; to put the bit in the mouth of (a horse).

Etymology 2

See bite

Verb

bit

  1. simple past tense of bite
    Your dog bit me!
  2. (informal in US, archaic in Britain) past participle of bite, bitten
    I have been bit by your dog!

Adjective

bit (not comparable)

  1. (chiefly in combination) Having been bitten.

Etymology 3

Coined by John Tukey in 1946 as an abbreviation of binary digit, probably influenced by connotations of “small portion”. First used in print 1948 by Claude Shannon. Compare byte and nybble.

Noun

bit (plural bits)

  1. (mathematics, computing) A binary digit, generally represented as a 1 or 0.
  2. (computing) The smallest unit of storage in a digital computer, consisting of a binary digit.
    Synonym: b
  3. (information theory, cryptography) Any datum that may take on one of exactly two values.
  4. (information theory) A unit of measure for information entropy.
    • The researchers found that the original texts spanned a variety of entropy values in different languages, reflecting differences in grammar and structure.
      But strangely, the difference in entropy between the original, ordered text and the randomly scrambled text was constant across languages. This difference is a way to measure the amount of information encoded in word order, Montemurro says. The amount of information lost when they scrambled the text was about 3.5 bits per word.
  5. A microbitcoin, or a millionth of a bitcoin (0.000001 BTC).
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • ban, nat, qubit

References

Anagrams

  • Bti, ITB, TBI, TiB, tib

Azerbaijani

Etymology

From Proto-Turkic *bït (louse).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bit]

Noun

bit (definite accusative biti, plural bitlər)

  1. louse

Declension


Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈbit/
  • Rhymes: -it

Noun

bit m (plural bits)

  1. (computing) bit

Czech

Etymology

From English bit, from binary digit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbɪt]
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Noun

bit m

  1. (computing) bit

Declension

Derived terms

  • bitový
  • osmibitový
  • šestnáctibitový
  • kilobit
  • megabit
  • gigabit
  • terabit

Further reading

  • bit in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu
  • bit in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • bit in Akademický slovník cizích slov, 1995, at prirucka.ujc.cas.cz

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪt/
  • Hyphenation: bit
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1

Ablaut of bijten.

Noun

bit n (plural bitten, diminutive bitje n)

  1. bit (for a working animal)
  2. bit (rotary cutting tool)
  3. mouthguard

Etymology 2

From English bit.

Noun

bit m (plural bits, diminutive bitje n)

  1. bit (binary digit)
  2. bit (unit of storage)
  3. bit (datum with two possible values)

French

Etymology

From English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bit/

Noun

bit m (plural bits)

  1. (computing) bit

Derived terms

  • bit le moins significatif
  • bit le plus significatif

Further reading

  • “bit” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Hungarian

Etymology

From English bit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbit]
  • Hyphenation: bit
  • Rhymes: -it

Noun

bit (plural bitek)

  1. (computing) bit (binary digit)

Declension

Derived terms

  • jelzőbit

References


Indonesian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbɪt]
  • Hyphenation: bit

Etymology 1

From English bit (binary digit).

Noun

bit (first-person possessive bitku, second-person possessive bitmu, third-person possessive bitnya)

  1. (computing) bit, smallest unit of storage.

Etymology 2

From Dutch biet.

Noun

bit (first-person possessive bitku, second-person possessive bitmu, third-person possessive bitnya)

  1. Beta vulgaris, common beet, beetroot, sugar beet, and chard.

Further reading

  • “bit” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Lashi

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bit/

Noun

bit

  1. sun

References

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[5], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʲit/

Verb

bit

  1. supine of biś

Nigerian Pidgin

Etymology

From English beat.

Verb

bit

  1. beat

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse biti

Noun

bit m (definite singular biten, indefinite plural biter, definite plural bitene)

  1. a bit, piece (of something)
  2. a bite, mouthful (of food)
Derived terms
  • isbit
  • smakebit

Etymology 2

From English bit (binary digit)

Noun

bit m (definite singular biten, indefinite plural bit or biter, definite plural bitene)

  1. a bit (binary digit)

References

  • “bit” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /biːt/

Noun

bit m (definite singular biten, indefinite plural bitar, definite plural bitane)

  1. a bit, piece (of something)
Derived terms
  • isbit
  • smakebit

Etymology 2

From English bit (binary digit)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪtː/

Noun

bit m (definite singular biten, indefinite plural bit or bitar, definit plural bitane)

  1. a bit (binary digit)

Etymology 3

From Old Norse bit

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /biːt/

Noun

bit n (definite singular bitet, indefinite plural bit, definite plural bita)

  1. a bite (e.g. insect bite, dog bite)
  2. a bite, mouthful (of food)

Etymology 4

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /biːt/

Verb

bit

  1. inflection of bite:
    1. present
    2. imperative

References

  • “bit” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Irish

Verb

bit

  1. third-person plural future of is

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English bit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbit͡ʃ(i)/, /ˈbit(i)/

Noun

bit m (plural bits)

  1. (mathematics, computing) bit (binary digit)

Synonyms

  • Abbreviations: b

Coordinate terms

  • Multiples: kilobit, megabit, gigabit, terabit, petabit, exabit, zettabit, yottabit

Related terms

  • byte (unit equivalent to 8 bits)

Saterland Frisian

Etymology

Related to German bis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪt/
  • Hyphenation: bit
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Conjunction

bit

  1. until

Preposition

bit

  1. until, to

Derived terms

References

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “bit”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN

Scots

Adjective

bit

  1. Little.
    • 1889, Jessup Whitehead, The Steward’s Handbook and Guide to Party Catering (page 439)
      A bit wee lambie
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      He laid a hundred guineas with the laird of Slofferfield that he would drive four horses through the Slofferfield loch, and in the prank he had his bit chariot dung to pieces and a good mare killed.

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology 1

From bȉti (to be)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bîːt/

Noun

bȋt f (Cyrillic spelling би̑т)

  1. essence
  2. point, meaning
Declension

Etymology 2

From English bit

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bît/

Noun

bȉt m (Cyrillic spelling би̏т)

  1. (computing) bit
Declension

Slavomolisano

Etymology

From Serbo-Croatian biti, from Proto-Slavic *byti, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *bū́ˀtei, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH-.

Verb

bit pf or impf

  1. to be

References

  • Walter Breu and Giovanni Piccoli (2000), Dizionario croato molisano di Acquaviva Collecroce: Dizionario plurilingue della lingua slava della minoranza di provenienza dalmata di Acquaviva Collecroce in Provincia di Campobasso (Parte grammaticale)., pp. 409–412

Spanish

Etymology

From English bit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbit/, [ˈbit̪]

Noun

bit m (plural bits)

  1. bit (binary digit)

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse biti, noun definitions 2 and 4: From English bit, from binary digit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /biːt/ (1–4)
  • IPA(key): /bɪt/ (3–4)

Noun

bit c

  1. bit (small piece)
  2. bit (portion)
  3. bit (binary digit)
  4. bit (unit of storage)
  5. bit (piece of music)

Declension

Related terms

  • pusselbit
  • sockerbit

Verb

bit

  1. imperative of bita.

Turkish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbit/

Etymology 1

From Ottoman Turkish بیت‎, بت‎, from Proto-Turkic *bït (louse).

Noun

bit (definite accusative biti, plural bitler)

  1. (zoology) louse
Declension
Derived terms
  • bit yeniği (fishy)
  • bitli (lousy)
See also
  • pire (flea)

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English bit, abbreviation of binary digit.

Noun

bit (definite accusative biti, plural bitler)

  1. (computing) bit
Declension

Etymology 3

Verb

bit

  1. second-person singular imperative of bitmek

Turkmen

Etymology

From Old Turkic bit(bit), from Proto-Turkic *bɨt (louse).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bit̪/

Noun

bit (definite accusative bidi, plural bitler)

  1. (zoology) louse

Declension


Vietnamese

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [ʔɓit̚˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [ʔɓit̚˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [ʔɓɨt̚˧˧]

Noun

bit

  1. (computing) bit

Zhuang

Pronunciation

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /pit˥/
  • Tone numbers: bit7
  • Hyphenation: bit

Etymology 1

From Proto-Tai *pitᴰ (duck). Cognate with Thai เป็ด (bpèt), Lao ເປັດ (pet), ᦵᦔᧆ (ṗed), Tai Dam ꪹꪜꪸꪒ, Shan ပဵတ်း (pét), Ahom ???????????????? (pit), Bouyei bidt, Saek ปิ๊ด. Compare Old Chinese (OC *pʰid).

Noun

bit (classifier duz, Sawndip form , old orthography bit)

  1. duck
Derived terms
  • roegbit

Etymology 2

From Chinese (MC pˠiɪt̚).

Noun

bit (classifier gaiq, Sawndip form ????, old orthography bit)

  1. pen; pencil; writing implement

Classifier

bit (old orthography bit)

  1. Classifier for sums of money and deals.

Etymology 3

From Chinese (MC pʰiɪt̚).

Classifier

bit (old orthography bit)

  1. Classifier for cloth: bolt of


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: chĭp, IPA(key): /tʃɪp/
  • Rhymes: -ɪp

Etymology 1

From Middle English chip, chippe, from Old English ċipp (chip; small piece of wood), from Old English *ċippian (to cut; hew) – attested in Old English forċippian (to cut off) –, from Proto-Germanic *kipp- (to cut; carve; hack; chop), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵeyb- (to split; divide; germinate; sprout). Related to Dutch kip, keep (notch; nick; score), Dutch kippen (to hatch), German Low German kippen (to cut; clip; trim; shorten), German kipfen (to chop off the tip; snip), Old Swedish kippa (to chop). Compare also chop.

The formally similar Old English ċipp, ċypp, ċyp (a beam; log; stock; post), from Proto-Germanic *kippaz (log; beam), whence Old Saxon kip (post), Old High German kipfa, chipfa (axle, stave) and Old Norse keppr (cudgel, club), ultimately from Latin cippus (stake; pale; post), is a different, unrelated word.

Noun

chip (plural chips)

  1. A small piece broken from a larger piece of solid material.
  2. A damaged area of a surface where a small piece has been broken off.
    This cup has a chip in it.
  3. (games, gambling) A token used in place of cash.
    • 2002, Albert H. Moorehead, Hoyle′s Rules of Games, page 46,
      If the second player does raise three chips, and all the other players drop, the player who opened may stay in by putting three more chips in the pot, for then he will have put in precisely as many chips as the second player.
  4. (slang, dated) A sovereign (the coin).
  5. (electronics) A circuit fabricated in one piece on a small, thin substrate.
    • 1986 September 1, Tom Moran, Lisa L. Spiegelman, New Chip Said to Contain Seven PC AT Chip Functions, InfoWorld, page 5,
      But sources close to the company said the chip contains two direct memory access controllers, two interrupt controllers, a timer, a memory mapper from Texas Instruments, and a Motorola Inc. real-time clock.
  6. (electronics) A hybrid device mounted in a substrate, containing electronic circuitry and miniaturised mechanical, chemical and/or biochemical devices.
    • 2002, Koji Ikuta, Atsushi Takahashi, Kota Ikeda, Shoji Maruo, User-Assembly Fully Integrated Micro Chemical Laboratory Using Biochemical IC Chips for Wearable/Implantable Applications, Yoshinobu Baba, Shuichi Shoji, Albert van den Berg (editors), Micro Total Analysis Systems 2002: Proceedings of the μTAS 2002 Symposium, Volume 1, page 38,
      Fig. 4(a) shows a schematic design of the micropump chip.
    • 2007, Elisabeth S. Papazoglou, Aravind Parthasarathy, Bionanotechnology, page 6,
      Fig. 0.3 is an image of the front and back views of a drug delivery microchip made of silicon and painted with gold, with a U.S. dime (10 cents). The chip in the picture consists of 34 nano-sized wells each of which is capable of housing 24 nl (nano liters) of drug. It is possible to make at least 400 wells or even 1000 or more in these chips which are very inexpensive, costing less tham $20 [22, 23].
  7. (Britain, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, especially in the plural) A fried strip of potato of square or rectangular cross-section; a french fry.
    Do you want sauce or mayonnaise on your chips?
  8. (US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, especially in the plural) A thin, crisp, fried slice of potato, or sometimes another vegetable; a crisp.
    they made their own potato chips from scratch, he ate a tortilla chip, served with a side of apple chips
  9. (sports) A shot during which the ball travels more predominantly upwards than in a regular shot, as to clear an obstacle.
  10. (curling) A takeout that hits a rock at an angle.
  11. A dried piece of dung, often used as fuel.
  12. (New Zealand, northern) A receptacle, usually for strawberries or other fruit.
  13. (cooking) A small, near-conical piece of food added in baking.
    chocolate chip
  14. A small rectangle of colour printed on coated paper for colour selection and matching. A virtual equivalent in software applications.
  15. (nautical) The triangular piece of wood attached to the log line.
  16. (historical) Wood or Cuban palm leaf split into slips, or straw plaited in a special manner, for making hats or bonnets.
  17. (archaic, derogatory) Anything dried up, withered, or without flavour.
  18. (golf) A low shot that travels further along the ground than it does in the air.
Usage notes

In New Zealand and Australia, where the term chip(s) can refer to either french fried potatoes or deep-fried potato slices, the dishes are distinguished as “hot chips” (french fried potatoes) or, in New Zealand, “cold chips” (deep-fried potato slices) when clarity is needed.

Synonyms
  • (small piece broken off): flake
  • (circuit): IC, integrated circuit, microchip, silicon chip
  • (deep-fried or baked slice of vegetable): crisp (UK, Ireland)
  • (deep-fried small column of potato): fry (mainly North America), French fries (mainly North America)
  • (a receptacle for strawberries): punnet (British, New Zealand, Australia), pottle (New Zealand, southern)
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Catalan: xip
  • Korean: (chip)
Translations
See also
  • French fries
  • fries
  • potato wedge
  • woodchip

Etymology 2

From Middle English chippen, from Old English *ċippian (to cut; hew) – attested in Old English forċippian (to cut off) –, from Proto-Germanic *kipp- (to cut; carve; hack; chop), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵey- (to split; divide; germinate; sprout). Related to Dutch kippen (to hatch), German Low German kippen (to cut; clip; trim; shorten), German kipfen (to chop off the tip; snip), Old Swedish kippa (to chop). Compare also chop.

Verb

chip (third-person singular simple present chips, present participle chipping, simple past and past participle chipped)

  1. (transitive) To chop or cut into small pieces.
  2. (transitive) To break small pieces from.
    Be careful not to chip the paint.
  3. (transitive, sports) To play a shot hitting the ball predominantly upwards rather than forwards. In association football specifically, when the shot is a shot on goal, the opposing goalkeeper may be the direct object of the verb, rather than the ball.
    • 2014, Paul Doyle, “Southampton hammer eight past hapless Sunderland in barmy encounter”, The Guardian, 18 October 2014:
      Koeman identified Southampton’s third as their finest goal of the game. Jack Cork, the most underrated player at a much-lauded club, swept the ball out wide to Tadic, who waited for Cork to run to the back post before chipping the ball across to him to slam in a deserved goal from close range, despite an attempted block by Vito Mannone.
    • 2016, Andy Edwards, “VIDEO: San Jose’s Quincy Amarikwa chips, goes upper-90 from 35 yards out”, NBCSports.com, 13 March 2016:
      Typically when someone scores a stunning goal this early in the season — it’s only Week 2 — it gets forgotten, or at the very least lost in the shuffle after eight more months of worthy GOTY candidates. Not this year, though, because no one is forgetting Amarikwa chipping Adam Kwarasey from 35 yards out and burying the ball in the top corner.
  4. (transitive, automotive) to upgrade an engine management system, usually to increase power.
  5. (intransitive) To become chipped.
    This varnish chips easily.
  6. (intransitive, card games, often with “in”) To ante (up).
  7. (transitive, informal) To fit (an animal) with a microchip.
  8. (Britain, transitive, often with “in”) to contribute.
    Everyone needs to chip in £1 for George’s leaving collection
  9. (also, to chip at) To make fun of.
Derived terms
  • chip in
  • chipped
  • chipping
Translations

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English chip.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʃɪp/
  • Hyphenation: chip
  • Rhymes: -ɪp

Noun

chip m (plural chips, diminutive chipje n)

  1. (electronics, computing) A chip (one-piece circuit or hybrid device containing a circuit and another device).

Derived terms

  • microchip
  • nanochip

Hungarian

Etymology

Borrowed from English chip.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈt͡ʃip]

Noun

chip

  1. Superseded spelling of csip.

Declension

References


Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /çɪpʲ/

Noun

chip m

  1. Lenited form of cip.

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English chip.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃip/

Noun

chip m (invariable)

  1. chip (small electronic component)

References


Min Nan


Polish

Alternative forms

  • czip

Etymology

From English chip, from Middle English chip, chippe, from Old English ċipp (chip; small piece of wood), from Old English *ċippian (to cut; hew), from Proto-Germanic *kipp- (to cut; carve; hack; chop), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵeyb- (to split; divide; germinate; sprout).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //t͡ʂip//

Noun

chip m inan

  1. (electronics) chip (integrated circuit)

Declension

Derived terms

  • (verb) chipować
  • (adjective) chipowy

Further reading

  • chip in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • chip in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology

From Hungarian kép (image).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kip/

Noun

chip n (plural chipuri)

  1. face, likeness
  2. picture, image

Declension

Synonyms

  • față
  • imagine

Derived terms

  • închipui

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English chip.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃip/, [ˈt͡ʃip]

Noun

chip m (plural chips)

  1. chip (circuit)

Derived terms


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