bitch vs kick what difference

what is difference between bitch and kick

English

Etymology

From Middle English biche, bicche, from Old English biċċe, from Proto-Germanic *bikjǭ (compare Norwegian bikkje (dog), Old Danish bikke), from *bikjaną (to thrust, attack) (compare Old Norse bikkja (plunge into water), Dutch bikken (to hack)). More at bicker.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bĭch, IPA(key): /bɪt͡ʃ/
  • (Can we verify(+) this pronunciation?) (Slang) IPA(key): /bɪt͡s/
  • Rhymes: -ɪtʃ

Noun

bitch (plural bitches)

  1. (dated or specialised, dog-breeding) A female dog or other canine, particularly a recent mother.
    • 1953, LIFE (volume 34, number 6, page 110)
      All members of one breed, both dog and bitch, champion and nonchampion, are judged in a series of competitions until only one animal remains.
  2. (archaic, offensive) A promiscuous woman, slut, whore.
  3. (vulgar, offensive) A despicable or disagreeable, aggressive person, usually a woman. [from 15th c.]
    • 1913, D. H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, I. iv. 60:
      ‘Look at the children, you nasty little bitch!’ he sneered.
    • 1959, William S. Burroughs, Naked Lunch, page 70
      HASSAN: “You cheap Factualist bitch! Go and never darken my rumpus room again!”
  4. (vulgar, offensive) A woman.
  5. (vulgar, offensive) A man considered weak, effeminate, timid or pathetic in some way
    1. (LGBT, slang, derogatory) An obviously gay man.
  6. (vulgar, offensive) A submissive person who does what others want; (prison slang) a man forced or coerced into a homoerotic relationship. [from the 20th c]
    Dude, don’t be such a bitch. Assert yourself.
    You’re so weak-willed with your girlfriend. You must be the real bitch in the relationship.
    • 1999 September 23, Chris Sheridan, “This House Is Freakin’ Sweet”, “Peter, Peter, Caviar Eater”, Family Guy, season 2, episode 1, Fox Broadcasting Company
      Now that you’re stinking rich, we’d gladly be your bitch.
  7. (obsolete, informal, of a man) A playful variation on dog (sense “man”). [from the 16th c]
  8. (humorous, vulgar, colloquial, used with a possessive pronoun) Friend. [from the 20th c]
    What’s up, my bitch?
    How my bitches been doin’?
  9. (vulgar, colloquial) A complaint, especially when the complaint is unjustified.
  10. (colloquial, vulgar, usually only used in the singular) A difficult or confounding problem.
    Level 5 was a real bitch, don’t you think?
    That’s a bitch of a question.
  11. (colloquial) A queen (playing card), particularly the queen of spades in the card game of hearts.
  12. (vulgar, figuratively) Something unforgiving and unpleasant.
    • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 27:
      …he wrote to me last week telling me about an incredible bitch of a row blazing there on account of someone having been and gone and produced an unofficial magazine called Raddled, full of obscene libellous Oz-like filth. And what I though, what Sammy and I thought, was—why not?
    Karma’s a bitch.
  13. (vulgar, informal, slang) Place; situation
    I’m ’bout to get up outta this bitch.

Usage notes

  • While bitch’s original canine sense permits it to be used in most media, it remains offensive enough that, in the US, it is often minced (as b, b-word, or female dog) in formal contexts.

Alternative forms

(offensive senses):
  • bih
  • biatch/biotch; beatch/beotch
  • binch
  • biyatch/biyotch; beeyatch/beeyotch
  • bizatch/biznatch

Synonyms

  • (female dog, etc): doggess (rare), female (when the species is specified or implied), she-dog
  • (malicious, etc, woman): See Thesaurus:shrew or Thesaurus:jerk
  • (malicious, etc, man): See Thesaurus:bastard or Thesaurus:jerk
  • (jocular slang, one’s friend): See Thesaurus:friend
  • (person in an unfavorable, undesirable position):
  • (person in a relationship who is made to adopt a submissive role): doormat, slave
  • (man forced into a homoerotic relationship in prison): punk, gunsel
  • (a complaint): gripe, grumble, kvetch, moan, whinge
  • (difficult or confounding problem): toughie, stinker, pain in the ass
  • (to talk about):

Hyponyms

female canine
  • brach, a female hound
  • vixen, a female fox
  • she-wolf

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • Weisenberg, Michael (2000) The Official Dictionary of Poker. MGI/Mike Caro University. →ISBN

Verb

bitch (third-person singular simple present bitches, present participle bitching, simple past and past participle bitched)

  1. (vulgar, intransitive) To behave or act as a bitch.
  2. (vulgar, intransitive) To criticize spitefully, often for the sake of complaining rather than in order to have the problem corrected.
    All you ever do is bitch about the food I cook for you!
    • 2008, Patterson Hood, “The Righteous Path”:
      I ain’t bitching ’bout things that aren’t in my grasp
      Just trying to hold steady on the righteous path.
  3. (vulgar, transitive) To spoil, to ruin.
    • 1924, Ford Madox Ford, Some Do Not…, Penguin 2012 (Parade’s End), p. 162:
      ‘You’re a Franco-maniac…You’re thought to be a French agent…That’s what’s bitching your career!’

Synonyms

  • (make derogatory comments): badmouth, slag off (UK), snipe
  • (complain spitefully): See Thesaurus:complain

Translations

References


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English bitch, from Middle English biche, bicche, from Old English biċċe, from Proto-Germanic *bikjǭ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪtʃ/
  • Hyphenation: bitch

Noun

bitch f (plural bitches, diminutive bitchje n)

  1. (derogatory) bitch (somewhat general term of abuse for a woman; disagreeable, assertive, aggressive or malicious woman)
    Synonyms: teef, trut, kreng
  2. (derogatory) bitch (person in a submissive or low-placed position)

Related terms

  • bitchen

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English bitch, from Middle English biche, bicche, from Old English biċċe, from Proto-Germanic *bikjǭ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bitʃ/

Noun

bitch f (plural bitchs)

  1. bitch (disagreeable, despicable woman)


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɪk/, [kʰɪk]
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Etymology 1

From Middle English kiken (to strike out with the foot), from Old Norse kikna (to sink at the knees) and keikja (to bend backwards) (compare Old Norse keikr (bent backwards, the belly jutting forward)), from Proto-Germanic *kaikaz (bent backwards), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Proto-Germanic *kī-, *kij- (to split, dodge, swerve sidewards), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵeyH- (to sprout, shoot). Compare also Dutch kijken (to look), Middle Low German kīken (to look, watch). See keek.

Verb

kick (third-person singular simple present kicks, present participle kicking, simple past and past participle kicked)

  1. (transitive) To strike or hit with the foot or other extremity of the leg.
    Did you kick your brother?
    • 1895, George MacDonald, Lilith, Chapter XII: Friends and Foes,
      I was cuffed by the women and kicked by the men because I would not swallow it.
    • 1905, Fielding H. Yost, Football for Player and Spectator, Chapter 6,
      A punt is made by letting the ball drop from the hands and kicking it just before it touches the ground.
    • 1919, Sherwood Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio, The Teacher: concerning Kate Swift,
      Will Henderson, who had on a light overcoat and no overshoes, kicked the heel of his left foot with the toe of the right.
  2. (intransitive) To make a sharp jerking movement of the leg, as to strike something.
    He enjoyed the simple pleasure of watching the kickline kick.
    • 1877, Anna Sewell, Black Beauty, Chapter 1: My Early Home
      Sometimes we had rather rough play, for they would frequently bite and kick as well as gallop.
    • 1904, Stratemeyer Syndicate, The Bobbsey Twins, Chapter II: Rope Jumping, and What Followed,
      “If you did that, I’d kick,” answered Freddie, and began to kick real hard into the air.
  3. (transitive) To direct to a particular place by a blow with the foot or leg.
    Kick the ball into the goal.
    • 1905, Fielding H. Yost, Football for Player and Spectator, Chapter 7,
      Sometimes he can kick the ball forward along the ground until it is kicked in goal, where he can fall on it for a touchdown.
  4. (with “off” or “out”) To eject summarily.
    • 1936 October, Robert E. Howard, The Conquerin’ Hero of the Humbolts, published in Action Stories
      “He’s been mad at me ever since I fired him off’n my payroll. After I kicked him off’n my ranch he run for sheriff, and the night of the election everybody was so drunk they voted for him by mistake, or for a joke, or somethin’, and since he’s been in office he’s been lettin’ the sheepmen steal me right out of house and home.”
    • 1976 February 3, Bill Gates, An Open Letter to Hobbyists,
      They are the ones who give hobbyists a bad name, and should be kicked out of any club meeting they show up at.
  5. (intransitive, Internet) To forcibly remove a participant from an online activity.
    He was kicked by ChanServ for flooding.
  6. (transitive, slang) To overcome (a bothersome or difficult issue or obstacle); to free oneself of (a problem).
    I still smoke, but they keep telling me to kick the habit.
  7. To move or push suddenly and violently.
    He was kicked sideways by the force of the blast.
    • 2011, Tom Andry, Bob Moore: No Hero
      The back of the car kicked out violently, forcing me to steer into the slide and accelerate in order to maintain control.
  8. (of a firearm) To recoil; to push by recoiling.
    • 2003, Jennifer C. D. Groomes, The Falcon Project, page 174,
      Lying on the ground, when fired, it kicked me back a foot. There was no way a person my size was going to be able to do an effective job with this gun.
    • 2006, Daniel D. Scherschel, Maple Grove, page 81,
      I asked my sister Jeanette if she wanted to shoot the 12 ga. shotgun. She replied, “does it kick“?
  9. (chess, transitive) To attack (a piece) in order to force it to move.
  10. (intransitive, cycling) To accelerate quickly with a few pedal strokes in an effort to break away from other riders.
    Contador kicks again to try to rid himself of Rasmussen.
  11. (intransitive) To show opposition or resistance.
  12. (printing, historical) To work a press by impact of the foot on a treadle.
Descendants
  • German: kicken
  • Welsh: cicio
Translations

Noun

kick (plural kicks)

  1. A hit or strike with the leg, foot or knee.
    A kick to the knee.
    • 1890, Jacob Riis, How the Other Half Lives, Chapter VII: A Raid on the Stable-Beer Dives,
      A kick of his boot-heel sent the door flying into the room.
    • 2011, Phil McNulty, Euro 2012: Montenegro 2-2 England [1]
      Elsad Zverotic gave Montenegro hope with a goal with the last kick of the first half – and when Rooney was deservedly shown red by referee Wolfgang Stark, England were placed under pressure they could not survive.
  2. The action of swinging a foot or leg.
    The ballerina did a high kick and a leap.
  3. (colloquial) Something that tickles the fancy; something fun or amusing.
    I finally saw the show. What a kick!
    I think I sprained something on my latest exercise kick.
  4. (Internet) The removal of a person from an online activity.
  5. (figuratively) Any bucking motion of an object that lacks legs or feet.
    The car had a nasty kick the whole way.
    The pool ball took a wild kick, up off the table.
  6. (uncountable and countable) Piquancy.
    • 2002, Ellen and Michael Albertson, Temptations, Fireside, →ISBN, page 124 [2]:
      Add a little cascabel pepper to ordinary tomato sauce to give it a kick.
    • 2003, Sheree Bykofsky and Megan Buckley, Sexy City Cocktails, Adams Media, →ISBN, page 129 [3]:
      For extra kick, hollow out a lime, float it on top of the drink, and fill it with tequila.
    • 2007 August 27, Anthony Lane, “Lone Sailors”, The New Yorker, volume 83, Issues 22-28
      The first time I saw “Deep Water,” the trace of mystery in the Crowhurst affair gave the movie a kick of excitement.
  7. A stimulation provided by an intoxicating substance.
  8. (soccer) A pass played by kicking with the foot.
  9. (soccer) The distance traveled by kicking the ball.
    a long kick up the field.
  10. A recoil of a gun.
  11. (informal) Pocket.
  12. An increase in speed in the final part of a running race.
  13. (film, television) Synonym of kicker (backlight positioned at an angle)
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:kick.
Descendants
  • German: Kick
  • Irish: cic
Translations

Derived terms

Etymology 2

Shortening of kick the bucket.

Verb

kick (third-person singular simple present kicks, present participle kicking, simple past and past participle kicked)

  1. (intransitive) To die.

Etymology 3

Shortening of kick ass

Verb

kick (third-person singular simple present kicks, present participle kicking, simple past and past participle kicked)

  1. (slang, intransitive) To be emphatically excellent.
    That band really kicks.

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Etymology 1

Borrowing from English kick.

Noun

kick m (plural kicks)

  1. kick, thrill (something that excites or gives pleasure)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

kick

  1. first-person singular present indicative of kicken
  2. imperative of kicken

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [kɪk]
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Verb

kick

  1. singular imperative of kicken
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of kicken

Yola

Verb

kick

  1. Alternative form of kink

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