bite vs morsel what difference

what is difference between bite and morsel

English

Etymology

From Middle English biten, from Old English bītan (to bite), from Proto-West Germanic *bītan, from Proto-Germanic *bītaną (to bite), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split). Cognates include Saterland Frisian biete (to bite), West Frisian bite (to bite), Dutch bijten (to bite), German Low German bieten (to bite), German beißen (to bite), Danish bide (to bite), Swedish bita (to bite), Norwegian Bokmål bite (to bite), Norwegian Nynorsk bita (to bite), Icelandic bíta (to bite), Gothic ???????????????????????? (beitan, to bite), Latin findō (split, verb), Ancient Greek φείδομαι (pheídomai), Sanskrit भिद् (bhid, to break).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bīt, IPA(key): /baɪt/
  • (Canada, regional US) IPA(key): /bʌɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪt
  • Homophones: bight, by’t, byte

Verb

bite (third-person singular simple present bites, present participle biting, simple past bit, past participle bitten or (rare) bit)

  1. (transitive) To cut into something by clamping the teeth.
  2. (transitive) To hold something by clamping one’s teeth.
  3. (intransitive) To attack with the teeth.
  4. (intransitive) To behave aggressively; to reject advances.
  5. (intransitive) To take hold; to establish firm contact with.
  6. (intransitive) To have significant effect, often negative.
  7. (intransitive, of a fish) To bite a baited hook or other lure and thus be caught.
  8. (intransitive, figuratively) To accept something offered, often secretly or deceptively, to cause some action by the acceptor.
  9. (intransitive, transitive, of an insect) To sting.
  10. (intransitive) To cause a smarting sensation; to have a property which causes such a sensation; to be pungent.
  11. (transitive, sometimes figuratively) To cause sharp pain or damage to; to hurt or injure.
  12. (intransitive) To cause sharp pain; to produce anguish; to hurt or injure; to have the property of so doing.
  13. (intransitive) To take or keep a firm hold.
  14. (transitive) To take hold of; to hold fast; to adhere to.
  15. (intransitive, slang) To lack quality; to be worthy of derision; to suck.
  16. (transitive, informal, vulgar) To perform oral sex on. Used in invective.
  17. (intransitive, African-American Vernacular, slang) To plagiarize, to imitate.
  18. (obsolete) To deceive or defraud; to take in.

Hyponyms

  • bite down

Derived terms

  • backbite
  • biter
  • biting

Related terms

Descendants

  • Sranan Tongo: beti

Translations

Noun

bite (plural bites)

  1. The act of biting.
  2. The wound left behind after having been bitten.
  3. The swelling of one’s skin caused by an insect’s mouthparts or sting.
  4. A piece of food of a size that would be produced by biting; a mouthful.
  5. (slang) Something unpleasant.
  6. (slang) An act of plagiarism.
  7. A small meal or snack.
  8. (figuratively) aggression
  9. The hold which the short end of a lever has upon the thing to be lifted, or the hold which one part of a machine has upon another.
  10. (colloquial, dated) A cheat; a trick; a fraud.
    • 1725, Thomas Gordon, The Humorist
      The baser methods of getting money by fraud and bite, by deceiving and overreaching.
  11. (colloquial, dated, slang) A sharper; one who cheats.
  12. (printing) A blank on the edge or corner of a page, owing to a portion of the frisket, or something else, intervening between the type and paper.
  13. (slang) A cut, a proportion of profits; an amount of money.
    • 1951, William S. Burroughs, in Harris (ed.), Letters 1945–59, Penguin 2009, p. 92:
      I know three Americans who are running a bar. The cops come in all the time for a bite.

Synonyms

  • (act of biting):
  • (wound left behind after having been bitten):
  • (swelling caused by an insect’s mouthparts or sting): sting
  • (piece of food of a size that would be produced by biting): mouthful
  • (slang: something unpleasant):
  • (slang: act of plagiarism):
  • (small meal or snack): snack
  • (figuratively: aggression):

Derived terms

Related terms

  • beetle
  • bit

Descendants

  • Sranan Tongo: beti

Translations

Anagrams

  • EBIT, Ebit, ebit, tebi-

French

Alternative forms

  • bitte

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bit/

Noun

bite f (plural bites)

  1. (slang, vulgar) knob, cock, dick

Derived terms

  • garage à bites
  • penser avec sa bite
  • petite bite
  • teub

Further reading

  • “bite” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Garo

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

bite

  1. fruit

Khumi Chin

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bi˩.te˧/

Adjective

bite

  1. hot

Related terms

  • bi-üngte

References

  • K. E. Herr (2011) The phonological interpretation of minor syllables, applied to Lemi Chin[2], Payap University, page 74

Latvian

Etymology

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *bitē (compare Lithuanian bitė), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰey-, *bʰī-. Cognate to English bee.

Noun

bite f (5th declension)

  1. bee

Declension


Murui Huitoto

Etymology

From Proto-Huitoto-Ocaina *bíʔte.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbi.tɛ]
  • Hyphenation: bi‧te

Verb

bite

  1. (intransitive) to come

Derived terms

References

  • Shirley Burtch (1983) Diccionario Huitoto Murui (Tomo I) (Linguistica Peruana No. 20)‎[3] (in Spanish), Yarinacocha, Peru: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, page 36
  • Katarzyna Izabela Wojtylak (2017) A grammar of Murui (Bue): a Witotoan language of Northwest Amazonia.[4], Townsville: James Cook University press (PhD thesis), page 76

Neapolitan

Noun

bite

  1. plural of bita

North Frisian

Verb

bite

  1. (Halligen), (Mooring) to bite

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse bíta, from Proto-Germanic *bītaną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split).

Verb

bite (present tense biter, past tense bet or beit, past participle bitt, present participle bitende)

  1. to bite

Derived terms

  • bite i gresset
  • bitende (adjective)

Related terms

  • bitt (noun)

References

  • “bite” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • bita (a infinitive)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²biːtɑ/

Etymology

From Old Norse bíta, from Proto-Germanic *bītaną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split). Akin to English bite.

Verb

bite (present tense bit, past tense beit, supine bite, past participle biten, present participle bitande, imperative bit)

  1. to bite

References

  • “bite” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *biti.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbi.te/

Noun

bite m

  1. bite

Descendants

  • Middle English: bitte, bite (merged with descendant of Old English bita)
    • Scots: bit
    • English: bit

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʲi.tɛ/

Participle

bite

  1. inflection of bity:
    1. neuter nominative/accusative/vocative singular
    2. nonvirile nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Turkish

Noun

bite

  1. dative singular of bit

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian bīta

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbitə/

Verb

bite

  1. to bite

Inflection

Further reading

  • “bite (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011


English

Etymology

From Middle English morsel, from Old French morsel, from Medieval Latin morsellum (a bit, a little piece), diminutive of Latin morsum (a bit), neuter of morsus, perfect passive participle of mordeo (I bite). Compare French morceau.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmɔːsəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈmɔɹsəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)səl

Noun

morsel (plural morsels)

  1. A small fragment or share of something, commonly applied to food.
    • 1979, Roald Dahl, The Twits
      By sticking out his tongue and curling it sideways to explore the hairy jungle around his mouth, he was always able to find a tasty morsel here and there to nibble on.
  2. A mouthful of food.
  3. A very small amount.
    • 2008, Pamela Griffin, New York Brides, Barbour Publishing Inc. (2008), →ISBN, page 70:
      Didn’t even a morsel of decency remain in his brother?

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:modicum.

Derived terms

  • morselize, morselization

Related terms

  • mordant
  • remorse

Translations

Further reading

  • morsel in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • morsel in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • “morsel”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “morsel”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • Merlos, Morels, morels, smoler

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • morselle, morsille, morssel, morscel, morcelle, mursel

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French morsel, morsiel, morcel.

Noun

morsel (plural morsels)

  1. small piece of food

Descendants

  • English: morsel
  • Yola: mossaale

References

  • “morsel, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Old French

Alternative forms

  • morcel

Etymology

From Medieval Latin morsellum (a bit, a little piece), diminutive of Latin morsum (a bit), neuter of morsus, past participle of mordeō, mordēre (bite, nibble, gnaw), from Proto-Indo-European *merə- (to rub, wipe; to pack, rob).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /murˈsɛl/

Noun

morsel m (oblique plural morseaus or morseax or morsiaus or morsiax or morsels, nominative singular morseaus or morseax or morsiaus or morsiax or morsels, nominative plural morsel)

  1. morsel; bit; piece

Descendants

  • English: morsel
  • French: morceau
  • Norman: morcé (Jersey, Guernsey)
  • Hungarian: morzsa

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