bite vs prick what difference

what is difference between bite and prick

English

Etymology

From Middle English biten, from Old English bītan (to bite), from Proto-West Germanic *bītan, from Proto-Germanic *bītaną (to bite), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split). Cognates include Saterland Frisian biete (to bite), West Frisian bite (to bite), Dutch bijten (to bite), German Low German bieten (to bite), German beißen (to bite), Danish bide (to bite), Swedish bita (to bite), Norwegian Bokmål bite (to bite), Norwegian Nynorsk bita (to bite), Icelandic bíta (to bite), Gothic ???????????????????????? (beitan, to bite), Latin findō (split, verb), Ancient Greek φείδομαι (pheídomai), Sanskrit भिद् (bhid, to break).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bīt, IPA(key): /baɪt/
  • (Canada, regional US) IPA(key): /bʌɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪt
  • Homophones: bight, by’t, byte

Verb

bite (third-person singular simple present bites, present participle biting, simple past bit, past participle bitten or (rare) bit)

  1. (transitive) To cut into something by clamping the teeth.
  2. (transitive) To hold something by clamping one’s teeth.
  3. (intransitive) To attack with the teeth.
  4. (intransitive) To behave aggressively; to reject advances.
  5. (intransitive) To take hold; to establish firm contact with.
  6. (intransitive) To have significant effect, often negative.
  7. (intransitive, of a fish) To bite a baited hook or other lure and thus be caught.
  8. (intransitive, figuratively) To accept something offered, often secretly or deceptively, to cause some action by the acceptor.
  9. (intransitive, transitive, of an insect) To sting.
  10. (intransitive) To cause a smarting sensation; to have a property which causes such a sensation; to be pungent.
  11. (transitive, sometimes figuratively) To cause sharp pain or damage to; to hurt or injure.
  12. (intransitive) To cause sharp pain; to produce anguish; to hurt or injure; to have the property of so doing.
  13. (intransitive) To take or keep a firm hold.
  14. (transitive) To take hold of; to hold fast; to adhere to.
  15. (intransitive, slang) To lack quality; to be worthy of derision; to suck.
  16. (transitive, informal, vulgar) To perform oral sex on. Used in invective.
  17. (intransitive, African-American Vernacular, slang) To plagiarize, to imitate.
  18. (obsolete) To deceive or defraud; to take in.

Hyponyms

  • bite down

Derived terms

  • backbite
  • biter
  • biting

Related terms

Descendants

  • Sranan Tongo: beti

Translations

Noun

bite (plural bites)

  1. The act of biting.
  2. The wound left behind after having been bitten.
  3. The swelling of one’s skin caused by an insect’s mouthparts or sting.
  4. A piece of food of a size that would be produced by biting; a mouthful.
  5. (slang) Something unpleasant.
  6. (slang) An act of plagiarism.
  7. A small meal or snack.
  8. (figuratively) aggression
  9. The hold which the short end of a lever has upon the thing to be lifted, or the hold which one part of a machine has upon another.
  10. (colloquial, dated) A cheat; a trick; a fraud.
    • 1725, Thomas Gordon, The Humorist
      The baser methods of getting money by fraud and bite, by deceiving and overreaching.
  11. (colloquial, dated, slang) A sharper; one who cheats.
  12. (printing) A blank on the edge or corner of a page, owing to a portion of the frisket, or something else, intervening between the type and paper.
  13. (slang) A cut, a proportion of profits; an amount of money.
    • 1951, William S. Burroughs, in Harris (ed.), Letters 1945–59, Penguin 2009, p. 92:
      I know three Americans who are running a bar. The cops come in all the time for a bite.

Synonyms

  • (act of biting):
  • (wound left behind after having been bitten):
  • (swelling caused by an insect’s mouthparts or sting): sting
  • (piece of food of a size that would be produced by biting): mouthful
  • (slang: something unpleasant):
  • (slang: act of plagiarism):
  • (small meal or snack): snack
  • (figuratively: aggression):

Derived terms

Related terms

  • beetle
  • bit

Descendants

  • Sranan Tongo: beti

Translations

Anagrams

  • EBIT, Ebit, ebit, tebi-

French

Alternative forms

  • bitte

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bit/

Noun

bite f (plural bites)

  1. (slang, vulgar) knob, cock, dick

Derived terms

  • garage à bites
  • penser avec sa bite
  • petite bite
  • teub

Further reading

  • “bite” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Garo

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

bite

  1. fruit

Khumi Chin

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bi˩.te˧/

Adjective

bite

  1. hot

Related terms

  • bi-üngte

References

  • K. E. Herr (2011) The phonological interpretation of minor syllables, applied to Lemi Chin[2], Payap University, page 74

Latvian

Etymology

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *bitē (compare Lithuanian bitė), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰey-, *bʰī-. Cognate to English bee.

Noun

bite f (5th declension)

  1. bee

Declension


Murui Huitoto

Etymology

From Proto-Huitoto-Ocaina *bíʔte.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbi.tɛ]
  • Hyphenation: bi‧te

Verb

bite

  1. (intransitive) to come

Derived terms

References

  • Shirley Burtch (1983) Diccionario Huitoto Murui (Tomo I) (Linguistica Peruana No. 20)‎[3] (in Spanish), Yarinacocha, Peru: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, page 36
  • Katarzyna Izabela Wojtylak (2017) A grammar of Murui (Bue): a Witotoan language of Northwest Amazonia.[4], Townsville: James Cook University press (PhD thesis), page 76

Neapolitan

Noun

bite

  1. plural of bita

North Frisian

Verb

bite

  1. (Halligen), (Mooring) to bite

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse bíta, from Proto-Germanic *bītaną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split).

Verb

bite (present tense biter, past tense bet or beit, past participle bitt, present participle bitende)

  1. to bite

Derived terms

  • bite i gresset
  • bitende (adjective)

Related terms

  • bitt (noun)

References

  • “bite” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • bita (a infinitive)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²biːtɑ/

Etymology

From Old Norse bíta, from Proto-Germanic *bītaną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split). Akin to English bite.

Verb

bite (present tense bit, past tense beit, supine bite, past participle biten, present participle bitande, imperative bit)

  1. to bite

References

  • “bite” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *biti.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbi.te/

Noun

bite m

  1. bite

Descendants

  • Middle English: bitte, bite (merged with descendant of Old English bita)
    • Scots: bit
    • English: bit

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʲi.tɛ/

Participle

bite

  1. inflection of bity:
    1. neuter nominative/accusative/vocative singular
    2. nonvirile nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Turkish

Noun

bite

  1. dative singular of bit

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian bīta

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbitə/

Verb

bite

  1. to bite

Inflection

Further reading

  • “bite (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɹɪk/, [pʰɹ̠̊ɪk]
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Etymology 1

From Middle English prik, prikke, from Old English prica, pricu (a sharp point, minute mark, spot, dot, small portion, prick), from Proto-Germanic *prikô, *prikō (a prick, point), of uncertain origin, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *breyǵ- (to scrape, scratch, rub, prickle, chap). Cognate with West Frisian prik (small hole), Dutch prik (point, small stick), Danish prik (dot), Icelandic prik (dot, small stick). Pejorative context came from prickers, or witch-hunters.

Noun

prick (plural pricks)

  1. A small hole or perforation, caused by piercing. [from 10th c.]
  2. An indentation or small mark made with a pointed object. [from 10th c.]
  3. (obsolete) A dot or other diacritical mark used in writing; a point. [10th-18th c.]
  4. (obsolete) A tiny particle; a small amount of something; a jot. [10th-18th c.]
  5. A small pointed object. [from 10th c.]
  6. The experience or feeling of being pierced or punctured by a small, sharp object. [from 13th c.]
  7. A feeling of remorse.
    • 1768–1777, Abraham Tucker, The Light of Nature Pursued
      the pricks of conscience
  8. (slang, vulgar) The penis. [from 16th c.]
  9. (Britain, Australia, US, slang, derogatory) Someone (especially a man or boy) who is unpleasant, rude or annoying. [from 16th c.]
  10. (now historical) A small roll of yarn or tobacco. [from 17th c.]
  11. The footprint of a hare.
  12. (obsolete) A point or mark on the dial, noting the hour.
  13. (obsolete) The point on a target at which an archer aims; the mark; the pin.
    • 1579, Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender, “September”
      they that shooten nearest the prick
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English prikken, from Old English prician, priccan (to prick), from Proto-Germanic *prikōną, *prikjaną (to pierce, prick), of uncertain origin; perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *breyǵ- (to scrape, scratch, rub, prickle, chap). Cognate with dialectal English pritch, Dutch prikken (to prick, sting), Middle High German pfrecken (to prick), Swedish pricka (to dot, prick), and possibly to Lithuanian įbrėžti (to scrape, scratch, carve, inscribe, strike).

Verb

prick (third-person singular simple present pricks, present participle pricking, simple past and past participle pricked)

  1. (transitive) To pierce or puncture slightly. [from 11th c.]
    1. (farriery) To drive a nail into (a horse’s foot), so as to cause lameness.
    2. (transitive, hunting) To shoot without killing.
      • 1871, Robert Smith Surtees, Jorrocks’s jaunts and jollities (page 48)
        They had shot at old Tom, the hare, too, but he is still alive; at least I pricked him yesterday morn across the path into the turnip field.
  2. (transitive) To form by piercing or puncturing.
  3. (obsolete) To mark or denote by a puncture; to designate by pricking; to choose; to mark.
    • c. 1620, Francis Bacon, letter of advice to Sir George Villiers
      Some who are pricked for sheriffs.
  4. (transitive, chiefly nautical) To mark the surface of (something) with pricks or dots; especially, to trace a ship’s course on (a chart). [from 16th c.]
  5. (nautical, obsolete) To run a middle seam through the cloth of a sail.
  6. To fix by the point; to attach or hang by puncturing.
    • 1615, George Sandys, The Relation of a Journey begun an. Dom. 1610, in four books
      The cooks […]prick it [a slice] on a prog of iron.
  7. (intransitive, dated) To be punctured; to suffer or feel a sharp pain, as by puncture.
    • 17th century (probably 1606), William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act IV, scene 1:
      By the pricking of my thumbs, / Something wicked this way comes.
  8. (transitive, intransitive) To make or become sharp; to erect into a point; to raise, as something pointed; said especially of the ears of an animal, such as a horse or dog; and usually followed by up.
    • The courser […] pricks up his ears.
  9. (horticulture) Usually in the form prick out: to plant (seeds or seedlings) in holes made in soil at regular intervals.
  10. (transitive) To incite, stimulate, goad. [from 13th c.]
  11. (intransitive, archaic) To urge one’s horse on; to ride quickly. [from 14th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.1:
      At last, as through an open plaine they yode,
      They spide a knight that towards them pricked fayre […].
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book II, lines 527 to 538.
    • 1881, Robert Louis Stevenson, Virginibus Puerisque:
      Indeed, it is a memorable subject for consideration, with what unconcern and gaiety mankind pricks on along the Valley of the Shadow of Death.
  12. To affect with sharp pain; to sting, as with remorse.
    • Now when they heard this, they were pricked in their heart.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Geraint and Enid
      I was pricked with some reproof.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      Three days remained till Beltane’s E’en, and throughout this time it was noted that Heriotside behaved like one possessed. It may be that his conscience pricked him, or that he had a glimpse of his sin and its coming punishment.
  13. (transitive) To make acidic or pungent.
  14. (intransitive) To become sharp or acid; to turn sour, as wine.
  15. To aim at a point or mark.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hawkins to this entry?)
  16. (obsolete, usually as prick up) to dress or adorn; to prink.
Translations

Swedish

Pronunciation

Adverb

prick

  1. exactly, sharp, on the spot

Noun

prick c

  1. a dot, small spot
  2. a remark, a stain (in a record of good behaviour)
  3. a guy, person; especially about a particularly nice or funny one
  4. a floating seamark in the form of a painted pole, possibly with cones, lights and reflectors

Usage notes

(guy, person): Mainly used in conjunction with the adjectives rolig (funny) or trevlig (nice), but also ruskig (eerie, scary).

Declension

Related terms

  • pricka
  • prickig

Derived terms

References

  • prick in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

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