bitterness vs rancor what difference

what is difference between bitterness and rancor

English

Etymology

From Middle English bitternesse, biternesse, from Old English biternes (bitterness; grief), equivalent to bitter +‎ -ness.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɪtənəs/

Noun

bitterness (countable and uncountable, plural bitternesses)

  1. The quality of having a bitter taste.
  2. The quality of feeling bitter; acrimony, resentment; the quality of exhibiting such feelings.
    She kept her bitterness about her mistreatment for the rest of her life.
    the bitterness of his words
  3. The quality of eliciting a bitter feeling; humiliating, harsh.
    Nothing could assuage the bitterness of their defeat.
  4. Harsh cold.
    The bitterness of the winter caught us all by surprise.

Synonyms

  • (quality of being bitter in taste): acerbicness, acridity, acridness
  • (quality of feeling bitter): acrimony, gall, rancor/rancour, resentment

Translations



English

Alternative forms

  • rancour (Commonwealth)

Etymology

First attested in the 13th century as Middle English rancour, from Old French rancor, from Latin rancor (rancidity, grudge, rancor), from *ranceō (be rotten or putrid, stink), from which also English rancid.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹæŋ.kɚ/
  • Rhymes: -æŋkə(ɹ)
  • Homophone: ranker

Noun

rancor (countable and uncountable, plural rancors)

  1. (American spelling) The deepest malignity or spite; deep-seated enmity or malice; inveterate hatred.
    I could almost see the rancor in his eyes when he challenged me to a fight.

Derived terms

  • rancorous
  • rancorously

Related terms

  • rancid

Translations

References

  • rancor in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • Carron, Cranor

Asturian

Noun

rancor m (plural rancores)

  1. rancor (the deepest malignity or spite)

Galician

Etymology

Attested since the 15th century. From Old Galician and Old Portuguese (compare Old Galicia-Portuguese rancura, 13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Latin rancor.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /raŋˈkoɾ/

Noun

rancor m (plural rancores)

  1. rancor; grudge
    • 1446, M. González Garcés (ed.), Historia de La Coruña. Edad Media. A Coruña: Caixa Galicia, page 635:
      estauan en moytas cartas de scomoion et testemoyos et eran en grande descordia et anduan en odios et rancores

      they were in many excommunicaton charters and litigations and they were in large discord and hate and rancor
    • 1612, Pedro Vázquez de Neira, “Soneto”, in Gómez Tónel, Exequias:
      aquel rancor que te carcome e laña

      that rancor that eats away and cracks through you
    Synonym: xenreira

References

  • “rancura” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI – ILGA 2006-2012.
  • “rancor” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez – Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • “rancor” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI – ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “rancor” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “rancor” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Latin

Etymology

*ranc(eō) (I am rotten, putrid) +‎ -or (-ness, abstract noun suffix)

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈran.kor/, [ˈɾäŋkɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈran.kor/, [ˈrɑŋkɔr]

Noun

rancor m (genitive rancōris); third declension (Late Latin)

  1. rancidity, stench, rankness
  2. grudge, rancor

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Descendants

  • Portuguese: rancor
  • Spanish: rencor
  • Catalan: rancor
  • Galician: rancor
  • Occitan: rancur
  • Old French: rancor, rancure
    • Dutch: rankeur
    • English: rancor
    • French: rancœur, rancune
  • Italian: rancore

References

  • rancor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • rancor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • rancor in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

Middle English

Noun

rancor

  1. Alternative form of rancour

Old French

Alternative forms

  • rancour
  • rancueur

Noun

rancor f (oblique plural rancors, nominative singular rancor, nominative plural rancors)

  1. ill-will; negative opinion or intention

Descendants

  • English: rancor, rancour
  • French: rancœur

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin rancor (rancor; putridity).

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ʁɐ̃.ˈkoɾ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ʁɐ̃.ˈkoʁ/
  • (Paulista) IPA(key): [ʁɐ̃.ˈkoɹ], [-ɾ]
  • (South Brazil) IPA(key): [hɐ̃.ˈkoɻ], [-ɾ]
  • Hyphenation: ran‧cor

Noun

rancor m (plural rancores)

  1. (usually uncountable) rancor; grudge (deep seated animosity)
    Synonyms: odiosidade, ressentimento

Related terms

  • rancorejar
  • rancorosamente
  • rancoroso

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial