bitterness vs rancour what difference

what is difference between bitterness and rancour

English

Etymology

From Middle English bitternesse, biternesse, from Old English biternes (bitterness; grief), equivalent to bitter +‎ -ness.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɪtənəs/

Noun

bitterness (countable and uncountable, plural bitternesses)

  1. The quality of having a bitter taste.
  2. The quality of feeling bitter; acrimony, resentment; the quality of exhibiting such feelings.
    She kept her bitterness about her mistreatment for the rest of her life.
    the bitterness of his words
  3. The quality of eliciting a bitter feeling; humiliating, harsh.
    Nothing could assuage the bitterness of their defeat.
  4. Harsh cold.
    The bitterness of the winter caught us all by surprise.

Synonyms

  • (quality of being bitter in taste): acerbicness, acridity, acridness
  • (quality of feeling bitter): acrimony, gall, rancor/rancour, resentment

Translations



English

Etymology

First attested as Middle English rancour in the early 13th century, from Old French rancor, from Latin rancor (rancidity, grudge, rancor), from *ranceō (be rotten or putrid, stink), from which also English rancid.

Noun

rancour (countable and uncountable, plural rancours)

  1. Britain and Canada spelling of rancor

References

  • rancour in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • rankor, rauncour, rancor, rankowre, rancur, rankour

Etymology

From Old French rancor, from Latin rancor.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ranˈkuːr/, /ˈrankur/
  • (Late ME) IPA(key): /ˈrankər/

Noun

rancour

  1. Jealousy, ire, towards someone; rancour (also as a metaphorical figure)
  2. (rare) Rancidity; something which smells vile.
  3. (rare) A belief that one is engaging in wrongdoing.

Descendants

  • English: rancour, rancor
  • Scots: rancour

References

  • “rancǒur, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-11-30.

Old French

Noun

rancour f (oblique plural rancours, nominative singular rancour, nominative plural rancours)

  1. Late Anglo-Norman spelling of rancur
    il se douterent qe nous eussiens conceu vers eux rancour & indignacion

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