blab vs clack what difference

what is difference between blab and clack

English

Etymology

From Middle English blabben (to talk foolishly), perhaps from Middle English blabbe (idle talk; talebearer). Compare Middle English blaberen (to blabber, babble), Middle High German blabezen (to stammer, babble).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blæb/
  • Rhymes: -æb

Verb

blab (third-person singular simple present blabs, present participle blabbing, simple past and past participle blabbed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To tell tales; to gossip without reserve or discretion.
    • And yonder a vile physician blabbing / The case of his patient.
  2. to speak carelessly or excessively

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:prattle

Translations

Noun

blab (countable and uncountable, plural blabs)

  1. (countable) One who blabs; a babbler; a telltale; a gossip or gossiper.
  2. (uncountable) Gossip; prattle.
    • 1976, David Toulmin, Blown Seed (page 148)
      Audie never liked him because he was further in with old Craig than he was, bragging and blowing about his work and the things he could do, while Audie sat quiet as a mouse listening to his blab.

Synonyms

  • (one who blabs): See also Thesaurus:chatterbox or Thesaurus:gossiper
  • (gossip, prattle): See also Thesaurus:chatter or Thesaurus:gossip

Translations

Related terms

  • blabber
  • blabbermouth
  • blabby
  • blubber


English

Etymology

From Middle English clacken, clakken, claken, from Old English *clacian (to slap, clap, clack), from Proto-Germanic *klakōną (to clap, chirp). Cognate with Scots clake, claik (to utter cries”, also “to bedaub, sully with a sticky substance), Dutch klakken (to clack, crack), Low German klakken (to slap on, daub), Norwegian klakke (to clack, strike, knock), Icelandic klaka (to twitter, chatter, wrangle, dispute).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /klæk/

Noun

clack (plural clacks)

  1. An abrupt, sharp sound, especially one made by two hard objects colliding repetitively; a sound midway between a click and a clunk.
  2. Anything that causes a clacking noise, such as the clapper of a mill, or a clack valve.
  3. Chatter; prattle.
    • whose chief intent is to vaunt his spiritual clack
  4. (colloquial) The tongue.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

clack (third-person singular simple present clacks, present participle clacking, simple past and past participle clacked)

  1. (intransitive) To make a sudden, sharp noise, or succession of noises; to click.
  2. (transitive) To cause to make a sudden, sharp noise, or succession of noises; to click.
  3. To chatter or babble; to utter rapidly without consideration.
    • 1623, Owen Feltham, Resolves: Divine, Moral, Political
      There is a generation of men, whose unweighed custome makes them clack out any thing their heedleſs fancy ſprings
  4. (Britain) To cut the sheep’s mark off (wool), to make the wool weigh less and thus yield less duty.
  5. Dated form of cluck.
    • 1934, Gladys Bagg Taber, Late Climbs the Sun (page 30)
      Only the chickens clacked at the Saturday quiet and fat mouse-minded cats licked whiskers on the empty steps.
    • 1964, Frances Margaret Cheadle McGuire, Gardens of Italy (page 57)
      We drive on between meadows of mown grass, through a pergola of vines, and so to an orchard of peaches, apples, and pears and a hen colony housed in neat modern cottages, the chickens clacking and scratching away []

Translations

References

clack in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.


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