blackcap vs thimbleberry what difference

what is difference between blackcap and thimbleberry

English

Etymology

From black +β€Ž cap.

Noun

blackcap (plural blackcaps)

  1. A small Old World warbler, Eurasian blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla), which is mainly grey with a black crown. [from 17th c.]
  2. (obsolete, Britain, US, dialectal) Any of various species of titmouse (of the family Paridae), including the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus, syn. Parus atricapillus). [17th–19th c.]
    • 2007, Nancy L. Canepa, translating Giambattista Basile, Tale of Tales, Penguin 2007, II.4:
      Other times the cat would run off to the hunting grounds, either the swamps or the Astroni, and when the hunters shot down an oriole or a great tit or a blackcap [transl. capofuscolo], she collected them and presented them to the king with the same message.
  3. (cooking) An apple roasted until black, to be served in a dish of boiled custard. [from 18th c.]
  4. (Canada, US) Whitebark raspberry (Rubus leucodermis). [from 19th c.]

Derived terms

  • bush blackcap (Lioptilus nigricapillus)
  • Eurasian blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla)
  • Wilson’s blackcap (Wilsonia pusilla)

Translations

Anagrams

  • clap back, clapback


English

Etymology

thimble +β€Ž berry

Noun

thimbleberry (plural thimbleberries)

  1. Rubus parviflorus, a species of Rubus, native to western and northern North America, from Alaska east to Ontario and Minnesota, and south to northern Mexico.
  2. The fruit of the above plant.
  3. The black raspberry, Rubus occidentalis.

See also

  • thimbleberry on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Rubus parviflorus on Wikispecies.Wikispecies

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