blackjack vs sap what difference

what is difference between blackjack and sap

English

Alternative forms

  • black jack, black-jack

Etymology

  • black +‎ jack

Pronunciation

  • enPR: blăk’jăk, IPA(key): /ˈblækdʒæk/

Noun

blackjack (countable and uncountable, plural blackjacks)

  1. (card games) A common gambling card game in casinos, where the object is to get as close to 21 without going over.
  2. (card games) A hand in the game of blackjack consisting of a face card and an ace.
  3. (card games) A variant of switch where each player is initially dealt the same number of cards, usually seven, and when one player plays a black jack the player whose turn comes next has to pick up that many cards, unless they play a red jack (as this normally cancels a black jack).
  4. The flag (i.e., a jack) traditionally flown by pirate ships; popularly thought to be a white skull and crossed bones on a black field (the Jolly Roger).
  5. (weaponry) A small, flat, blunt, usually leather-covered weapon loaded with heavy material such as lead or ball bearings, intended to inflict a blow to the head that renders the victim unconscious with diminished risk of lasting cranial trauma.
    Coordinate terms: baton, cosh, sap
  6. (aviation) A tool of leather filled with shot (or similar), resembling the weapon, used for shaping sheet metal.
  7. Any of several species of weed of genus Bidens, such as Bidens pilosa, in the family Compositae.
  8. A blackjack oak.
    • 1931, William Faulkner, Sanctuary, Library of America, 1985, p.20:
      A steep slope rose, crested by stunted blackjacks.
  9. Any of a series of hard, dark soils, often considered low quality, but suitable for growing certain crops such as cotton.
    • 1859, Henry Ward Beecher, Plain and Pleasant Talk about Fruits, Flowers, and Farming, page 216:
      This man had a brother about six miles off, settled on a rich White River bottom-land farm — and while a blackjack clay soil yielded seventy bushels to the acre, this fine bottom-land would not average fifty.
    • 1884, United States Census Office, Census Reports: Tenth Census: June 1, 1880: Cotton production in the United States, page 20:
      Blackjack soil is generally the poorest of all; it covers the narrow and rocky ridges, and has a stunted growth of blackjack and post oaks. The soil is dark in color, thin and cold, and is underlaid with pale yellow or slate-colored clay.
    • 1911, Field Operations of the Bureau of Soils, page 1871:
      The predominant soil is the blackjack soil like that of the lower plateaus, seemingly, however, in most cases a little more sandy and a little coarser in grain.
    • 2010, Gary Mark Fleeger, Steven J. Whitmeyer, The Mid-Atlantic Shore to the Appalachian Highlands: Field Trip Guidebook for the 2010 Joint Meeting of the Northeastern and Southeastern GSA Sections, Geological Society of America (→ISBN), page 48:
      Today, most types of land development in areas underlain by Iredell and related “blackjack” soil series—a catch-all term for Jackland, Whitestore, Orange, Zion, and other high shrink-swell clayey soils—is generally discouraged.
    • 2011, Michael Eury, Concord, Arcadia Publishing (→ISBN):
      Cotton grew robustly in western Cabarrus County’s blackjack soil, pointing Concord beyond its agricultural base toward its first industry: textiles.
  10. (pharmacology, Britain, rare) Ammonium bituminosulfonate.

Translations

Verb

blackjack (third-person singular simple present blackjacks, present participle blackjacking, simple past and past participle blackjacked)

  1. To strike with a blackjack or similar weapon.

See also

  • baccarat
  • bludgeon
  • cosh
  • pontoon
  • truncheon
  • twenty-one

Further reading

  • blackjack on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • blackjack (weapon) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈblækdʒæk/, [ˈblækdʒæk]

Noun

blackjack

  1. blackjack (card game)
  2. blackjack (hand in that game)

Declension

or


Spanish

Noun

blackjack m (plural blackjacks)

  1. blackjack (card game)


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sæp/
  • Rhymes: -æp

Etymology 1

From Middle English sap, from Old English sæp (juice, sap), from Proto-West Germanic *sap (sap, juice) (compare Dutch sap, German Saft, Icelandic safi), from Proto-Indo-European *sab-, *sap- (to taste) (compare Welsh syb-wydd (fir), Latin sapa (must, new wine), Russian со́пли (sópli, snivel), Armenian համ (ham, juice, taste), Avestan ????????-????????????????(vi-šāpa, having poisonous juices), Sanskrit सबर् (sabar, juice, nectar)). More at sage.

Noun

sap (countable and uncountable, plural saps)

  1. (uncountable) The juice of plants of any kind, especially the ascending and descending juices or circulating fluid essential to nutrition.
  2. (uncountable) The sapwood, or alburnum, of a tree.
  3. Any juice.
  4. (figuratively) Vitality.
  5. (slang, countable) A naive person; a simpleton
    Synonyms: milksop, saphead
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

sap (third-person singular simple present saps, present participle sapping, simple past and past participle sapped)

  1. (transitive) To drain, suck or absorb from (tree, etc.).
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To exhaust the vitality of.

Etymology 2

Probably from sapling.

Noun

sap (plural saps)

  1. (countable, US, slang) A short wooden club; a leather-covered hand weapon; a blackjack.
    • 1944, William Faulkner, Leigh Brackett, Jules Furthman, The Big Sleep (screenplay)
      I risk my whole future, the hatred of the cops and Eddie Mars’ gang. I dodge bullets and eat saps.
Translations

Verb

sap (third-person singular simple present saps, present participle sapping, simple past and past participle sapped)

  1. (transitive, slang) To strike with a sap (with a blackjack).
    • 1944, William Faulkner, Leigh Brackett, Jules Furthman, The Big Sleep (screenplay)
      [A]s he passes the mouth of a narrow alley two men step out quickly. One of them saps Marlowe expertly — they drag him out of sight.
    • 1964, Raymond Chandler, ‎Killer in the Rain
      And when he had me up there he would sap me again and I wouldn’t remember anything that happened in between the two sappings.
Translations

Etymology 3

From French saper (compare Spanish zapar and Italian zappare) from sape (sort of scythe), from Late Latin sappa (sort of mattock).

Noun

sap (plural saps)

  1. (military) A narrow ditch or trench made from the foremost parallel toward the glacis or covert way of a besieged place by digging under cover of gabions, etc.
Derived terms
  • sap fagot
  • sap roller
  • sapper
Translations

Verb

sap (third-person singular simple present saps, present participle sapping, simple past and past participle sapped)

  1. (transitive) To subvert by digging or wearing away; to mine; to undermine; to destroy the foundation of.
  2. (transitive, military) To pierce with saps.
  3. (transitive) To make unstable or infirm; to unsettle; to weaken.
    • 1850, Alfred Tennyson, Ring, Out, Wild Bells
      Ring out the grief that saps the mind []
  4. (transitive) To gradually weaken.
  5. (intransitive) To proceed by mining, or by secretly undermining; to execute saps.
Translations

Anagrams

  • APS, APs, ASP, PAS, PAs, PSA, Pas, Psa., SPA, Spa, asp, pas, spa

Aromanian

Alternative forms

  • sapu, tsap, tsapu

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *sappō, from Latin sappa. Compare Romanian săpa, sap, French saper, Italian zappare, Sicilian zappari, Spanish zapar, Friulian sapâ, Venetian sapar, Latin sappa.

Verb

sap (past participle sãpatã)

  1. I dig (with a pick).

Related terms

  • sãpari / sãpare
  • sãpat
  • sapã
  • sãpãtor
  • sãpãturã

See also

  • tãrchescu
  • arãm

Catalan

Alternative forms

  • sab (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sap/
  • Rhymes: -ap

Verb

sap

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of saber

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch sap, from Old Dutch *sap, from Proto-West Germanic *sap.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɑp/
  • Hyphenation: sap
  • Rhymes: -ɑp

Noun

sap n (plural sappen, diminutive sapje n)

  1. sap (fluid in plants)
  2. juice
    Hyponyms: aalbessensap, appelsap, citroensap, druivensap, sinaasappelsap, vruchtensap

Derived terms

  • aalbessensap
  • appelsap
  • appelsiensap
  • bessensap
  • bietensap
  • boomsap
  • citroensap
  • druivensap
  • maagsap
  • perensap
  • sappig
  • sinaasappelsap
  • vruchtensap
  • wortelsap
  • zwartebessensap

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: sap
  • Negerhollands: sap

References

Anagrams

  • pas

Kholosi

Etymology

From Sanskrit सर्प (sarpa).

Noun

sap ?

  1. snake

References

  • Eric Anonby; Hassan Mohebi Bahmani (2014), “Shipwrecked and Landlocked: Kholosi, an Indo-Aryan Language in South-west Iran”, in Cahier de Studia Iranica xx[1], pages 13-36

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • saape, saappe, sape, sapp, sappe, zep
  • (early ME) sæp, sæpp

Etymology

From Old English sæp, from Proto-West Germanic *sap, from Proto-Indo-European *sep-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sap/, /saːp/

Noun

sap (uncountable)

  1. sap (plant juices)
  2. sapwood (wood under bark)
  3. (rare) earwax

Derived terms

  • sappy
  • sapplyng

Descendants

  • English: sap
  • Scots: sap, saup

References

  • “sā̆p(e, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sap/

Verb

sap

  1. second-person singular imperative of sapać

Romani

Etymology

From Sauraseni Prakrit ???????????????? (sappa), from Sanskrit सर्प (sarpá, snake), from Proto-Indo-Iranian *sarpás. Cognate with Punjabi ਸੱਪ (sappa, snake).

Pronunciation

Noun

sap m (plural sapa)

  1. snake

References

  • Turner, Ralph Lilley (1969–1985), “sap”, in A Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages, London: Oxford University Press, page 766
  • Yaron Matras (2002), “Historical and linguistic origins”, in Romani: A Linguistic Introduction[2], Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 40
  • Yūsuke Sumi (2018), “sap, ~a”, in ニューエクスプレスプラス ロマ(ジプシー)語 [New Express Plus Romani (Gypsy)] (in Japanese), Tokyo: Hakusuisha, published 2021, →ISBN, OCLC 1267332830, page 154

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [sap]

Verb

sap

  1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive of săpa

Turkish

Etymology

From Ottoman Turkish صاپ(sap, handle; stalk; hair), from Old Turkic sap(sap), from Proto-Turkic [Term?].

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɑp/

Adjective

sap

  1. (slang) not having a significant other

Noun

sap (definite accusative sapı, plural saplar)

  1. handle
  2. stem, stalk
  3. (slang) penis
  4. (slang) male

Declension


Veps

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *sappi.

Noun

sap

  1. gall (bile)

Volapük

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin sapiō (I am wise).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɑːp/

Noun

sap

  1. wisdom

Zhuang

Pronunciation

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /θaːp˧˥/
  • Tone numbers: sap7
  • Hyphenation: sap

Etymology 1

From Proto-Tai *saːpᴰ (cockroach). Cognate with Thai สาบ (sàap), Lao ສາບ (sāp), Shan သၢပ်ႇ (sàap), Bouyei saabt.

Noun

sap (Sawndip form ????, old orthography sap)

  1. cockroach

Etymology 2

Verb

sap (old orthography sap)

  1. to wear shoes with the heels stepping down on the back of the shoes

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