bladder vs vesica what difference

what is difference between bladder and vesica

English

Alternative forms

  • blather, blether (Scotland)

Etymology

From Middle English bladdre, bleddre, bladder, bledder, from Old English blæddre, a variant of blǣdre, blēdre (blister, bladder), from Proto-Germanic *blēdrǭ, *bladrǭ (blister, bladder); akin to Old High German platara (German Blatter) and Old Norse blaðra (Danish blære), (Norwegian blære).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈblædə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈblæɾɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ædə(r)

Noun

bladder (plural bladders)

  1. (zoology) A flexible sac that can expand and contract and that holds liquids or gases.
  2. (anatomy) Specifically, the urinary bladder.
  3. (botany) A hollow, inflatable organ of a plant.
  4. The inflatable bag inside various balls used in sports, such as footballs and rugby balls.
  5. A sealed plastic bag that contains wine and is usually packaged in a cask.
  6. (figuratively) Anything inflated, empty, or unsound.
    • 1711, Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 3rd Earl of Shaftesbury, “Sensus Communis”, in Characteristicks of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times
      to swim with bladders of philosophy

Synonyms

  • vesica

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

bladder (third-person singular simple present bladders, present participle bladdering, simple past and past participle bladdered)

  1. To swell out like a bladder with air; to inflate.
    • 1610, Giles Fletcher, Christ’s Victorie and Triumph, in Heaven, in Earth, over and after Death
      bladder’d up with pride of his own mcrit
  2. (transitive) To store or put up in bladders.

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch blader. Variant of blaar. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈblɑ.dər/
  • Hyphenation: blad‧der
  • Rhymes: -ɑdər

Noun

bladder f or m (plural bladders, diminutive bladdertje n)

  1. blister, particularly of paint

Middle English

Noun

bladder

  1. Alternative form of bladdre


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin vēsīca (bladder).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvɛsɪkə/, IPA(key): /ˈviːsɪkə/

Noun

vesica (plural vesicae)

  1. (anatomy) A bladder, especially the urinary bladder or the gall bladder.
  2. (art) The vesica piscis or oval aureole in mediaeval painting.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • cavies

Interlingua

Noun

vesica (plural vesicas)

  1. bladder

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *wend-tri-, see also venter, uterus and German Wanst.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /u̯eːˈsiː.ka/, [u̯eːˈs̠iːkä]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /veˈsi.ka/, [vɛˈs̬iːkɑ]

Noun

vēsīca f (genitive vēsīcae); first declension

  1. (anatomy) bladder, urinary bladder

Declension

First-declension noun.

Derived terms

  • vēsīcō
  • vēsīcula

Descendants

  • English: vesica
  • Romanian: vezică
  • Vulgar Latin: *vēssīca
    • Eastern Romance:
      • Aromanian: bishicã, bishãcã
      • Romanian: bășică, beșică
    • Ibero-Romance:
      • Asturian: vexiga
      • Galician: vexiga
      • Mozarabic: [script needed] (bešíka)
      • Portuguese: bexiga
      • Spanish: vejiga
    • Italo-Romance:
      • Italian: vescica
      • Sardinian: buscica, bussica, piscica, busuca
      • Sicilian: viscica, vuscica, buscica
      • Venetian: vesiga
    • Old French: vessie, vecie
      • Middle French: vessie
        • French: vessie
      • Norman: vessie
      • Walloon: vexheye
    • Old Occitan:
      • Catalan: veixiga
      • Occitan: vessiga, veishiga
    • Rhaeto-Romance:
      • Friulian: vissie
      • Romansch: vaschia, vischigia, vascheia, vschia
    • Albanian: fshikë

References

  • vesica in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • vesica in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • vesica in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

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