blade vs sword what difference

what is difference between blade and sword

English

Etymology

From Middle English blade, blad, from Old English blæd (leaf), from Proto-West Germanic *blad, from Proto-Germanic *bladą, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰl̥h₃-o-to-m, from *bʰleh₃- (to thrive, bloom)

See also West Frisian bled, Dutch blad, German Blatt, Danish blad, Irish bláth (flower), Welsh blodyn (flower), Tocharian A pält, Tocharian B pilta (leaf), Albanian fletë (leaf). Similar usage in German Sägeblatt (saw blade, literally saw leaf). Doublet of blat. More at blow.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: blād, IPA(key): /bleɪd/
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Noun

blade (plural blades)

  1. The sharp cutting edge of a knife, chisel, or other tool, a razor blade/sword.
  2. The flat functional end of a propeller, oar, hockey stick, screwdriver, skate, etc.
  3. The narrow leaf of a grass or cereal.
  4. (botany) The thin, flat part of a plant leaf, attached to a stem (petiole). The lamina.
  5. A flat bone, especially the shoulder blade.
  6. A cut of beef from near the shoulder blade (part of the chuck).
  7. (chiefly phonetics, phonology) The part of the tongue just behind the tip, used to make laminal consonants.
  8. (poetic) A sword or knife.
  9. (archaeology) A piece of prepared, sharp-edged stone, often flint, at least twice as long as it is wide; a long flake of ground-edge stone or knapped vitreous stone.
  10. (ultimate frisbee) A throw characterized by a tight parabolic trajectory due to a steep lateral attitude.
  11. (sailing) The rudder, daggerboard, or centerboard of a vessel.
  12. A bulldozer or surface-grading machine with mechanically adjustable blade that is nominally perpendicular to the forward motion of the vehicle.
  13. (dated) A dashing young man.
    • 1832, The Universal Songster: Or, Museum of Mirth (page 189)
      But very often blust’ring blades / Are Jerry Sneaks at home.
    • 2009, Amanda Vickery, Behind Closed Doors, Yale University Press, p. 77:
      Young blades were expected to kick over the traces and skirt disaster, before they graduated to matrimonial housekeeping.
  14. (slang, chiefly US) A homosexual, usually male.
  15. Thin plate, foil.
  16. (photography) One of a series of small plates that make up the aperture or the shutter of a camera.
  17. (architecture, in the plural) The principal rafters of a roof.
  18. (biology) The four large shell plates on the sides, and the five large ones of the middle, of the carapace of the sea turtle, which yield the best tortoise shell.
  19. (computing) A blade server.
  20. (climbing) Synonym of knifeblade
  21. (mathematics) An exterior product of vectors. (The product may have more than two factors. Also, a scalar counts as a 0-blade, a vector as a 1-blade; an exterior product of k vectors may be called a k-blade.)
    Holonym: multivector
  22. The part of a key that is inserted into the lock.
    Coordinate term: bow

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • Creswell Crags

Verb

blade (third-person singular simple present blades, present participle blading, simple past and past participle bladed)

  1. (informal) To skate on rollerblades.
  2. (transitive) To furnish with a blade.
  3. (intransitive, poetic) To put forth or have a blade.
    • 1633, Phineas Fletcher, “Elisa”, in Piscatorie Eclogues and other Poetical Miscellanies
      As sweet a plant, as fair a flower, is faded / As ever in the Muses’ garden bladed.
  4. (transitive) To stab with a blade
  5. (transitive, professional wrestling, slang) To cut (a person) so as to provoke bleeding.

Derived terms

  • hydroblade

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Balde, abled, albed, baled, blead

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English blade, from Middle English blade. Doublet of blad.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bleːd/
  • Hyphenation: blade

Noun

blade m (plural blades)

  1. (sports, chiefly plural) A running blade (prosthetic limb used for running).

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • blad, blaad, bladd, blayde, blayd

Etymology

From Old English blæd, from Proto-West Germanic *blad, from Proto-Germanic *bladą, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰl̥h₃otom.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blaːd/, /blad/

Noun

blade (plural blades or bladdys)

  1. A leaf or blade; a piece foliage in general.
  2. A blade (sharp edge of a weapon).
  3. Any sharp-bladed slashing or stabbing weapon.
  4. (rare) A wooden tile or chip for roofing.
  5. (rare) Anything close in appearance or form to a blade.

Derived terms

  • bladyn
  • blader

Descendants

  • English: blade
  • Scots: blad, blade, blaud, blaid

References

  • “blā̆d(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-06-29.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbla.dɛ/

Adjective

blade

  1. inflection of blady:
    1. neuter nominative/accusative/vocative singular
    2. nonvirile nominative/accusative/vocative plural


English

Alternative forms

  • swerd (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English sword, swerd, from Old English sweord (sword), from Proto-West Germanic *swerd, from Proto-Germanic *swerdą (sword), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂w- (sharp). Cognate with Scots swuird, swerd, sword (sword), North Frisian swird (sword), West Frisian swurd (sword), Dutch zwaard (sword), Low German Sweerd, Schwert (sword), German Schwert (sword), Danish sværd, Norwegian sverd, Swedish svärd (sword), Icelandic sverð (sword), Old East Slavic свьрдьлъ (svĭrdĭlŭ, drill).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /sɔɹd/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /sɔːd/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /so(ː)ɹd/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /soəd/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)d
  • Homophone: soared; sawed (non-rhotic accents with the horse–hoarse merger)

Noun

sword (plural swords)

  1. (weaponry) A long-bladed weapon with a hilt, and usually a pommel and cross-guard, which is designed to stab, slash, and/or hack.
    • Unsheathe your sword and dub him presently.
  2. (tarot) A suit in the minor arcana in tarot.
  3. (tarot) A card of this suit.
  4. (weaving) One of the end bars by which the lay of a hand loom is suspended.
  5. (heraldry) The weapon, often used as a heraldic charge.

Coordinate terms

  • (weaponry): bayonet, claymore, cutlass, dagger, epee, épée, falchion, foil, katana, knife, machete, rapier, sabre, saber, scimitar, vorpal, yataghan, yatagan

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

sword (third-person singular simple present swords, present participle swording, simple past and past participle sworded)

  1. To stab or cut with a sword

Anagrams

  • words

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • swerd, sord, sworde, zuord

Etymology

From Old English sword, a Mercian form of sweord (which some forms are directly from); from Proto-Germanic *swerdą.

Pronunciation

  • (Early ME; from sweord) IPA(key): /swœrd/
  • (From sweord) IPA(key): /swɛrd/, /swurd/, /surd/
  • IPA(key): /swɔrd/, /sɔrd/

Noun

sword (plural swordes or (early) sweorden)

  1. sword, sabre
  2. (figuratively) Military might or power.

Descendants

  • English: sword
  • Scots: swerd, sword

References

  • “sword, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-03-16.

Old English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sword/, [sworˠd]

Noun

sword n (nominative plural sword) (Mercian)

  1. Alternative form of sweord

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