blah vs fustian what difference

what is difference between blah and fustian

English

Etymology

  • Sense “Idle, meaningless talk” (1940), probably imitative or echoic in origin. Perhaps, but cf Greek “barbarbar” ‘unintelligible sounds’ (Grillo 1989:174).
  • Adjective sense “bland, dull” (1919), perhaps influenced by French blasé (bored, indifferent).
  • The blahs (“boredom, mild depression”) first attested 1969; extension of adjective sense and influenced by term the blues.
  • Also may be connected with bleat

GRILLO, R.D. 1989. Dominant languages: Language and hierarchy in Britain and France. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /blɑː/
  • IPA(key): /bla/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː

Noun

blah (countable and uncountable, plural blahs)

  1. (uncountable, informal) Nonsense; drivel; idle, meaningless talk.
  2. (informal) (in plural, the blahs) A general or ambiguous feeling of discomfort, dissatisfaction, uneasiness, boredom, mild depression, etc.

Synonyms

  • (nonsense, drivel): bosh, bombast, bunkum, claptrap, eyewash, fustian, rant, hooey, humbug, rubbish, twaddle
  • (feeling of boredom, mild depression): malaise

Translations

Adjective

blah (comparative more blah, superlative most blah)

  1. (informal) Dull; uninteresting; insipid.
    Well, the new restaurant seems nice, but their menu is a little blah.
  2. (informal) Low in spirit or health; down.
    I decided to go exercise rather than sit around all day feeling blah.

Interjection

blah

  1. An expression of mild frustration.
    Synonyms: bah, blast, drat, (archaic) fie
    Blah! Why can’t I get this computer to work!
  2. (When spoken repeatedly, often three times in succession: blah blah blah!) Imitative of idle, meaningless talk; used sometimes in a slightly derogatory manner to mock or downplay another’s words, or to show disinterest in a diatribe, rant, instructions, unsolicited advice, parenting, etc. Also used when recalling and retelling another’s words, as a substitute for the portions of the speech deemed irrelevant.
    Synonyms: blah blah, blah blah blah, yada yada yada
    Yeah, yeah, blah blah blah, Mom, you said this all yesterday.
    And then he was like, “Oh, my brother’s an Internet millionaire, blah blah blah.” Like I care!
  3. Representing the sound of vomiting.
    Synonyms: bleah, blech, bleh

Translations

Verb

blah (third-person singular simple present blahs, present participle blahing, simple past and past participle blahed)

  1. (intransitive) To utter idle, meaningless talk.
    • 2015, Tony Blair, Jeremy Corbyn’s politics are fantasy – just like Alice in Wonderland (in The Guardian, 29 August 2015) [1]
      Someone else said to me: “If you’re writing something again, don’t blah on about winning elections; it really offends them.”

See also

  • barbarian
  • rhubarb

Anagrams

  • Bahl


English

Etymology

  • Middle English fustian, from Old French fustaine, from Medieval Latin fustaneum, probably from Latin fustis (club; (medieval use) tree trunk).
  • Used in the sense of “pomposity” since at least the time of Shakespeare. For the shift of meaning from cloth-related terminology, compare bombast.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfʌs.tʃən/, /ˈfʌs.ti.ən/

Noun

fustian (usually uncountable, plural fustians)

  1. A kind of coarse twilled cotton or cotton and linen stuff, chiefly prepared for menswear.
    • 1478, Geoffrey Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, Prologue, 75-8,
      Of fustian he wered a gypon / Al bismotered with his habergeoun, / For he was late ycome from his viage, / And wente for to doon his pilgrymage.
    • ,
      Where’s the cook? Is supper ready, the house trimm’d, rushes strew’d, cobwebs swept, the serving-men in their new fustian, their white stockings, and every officer his wedding-garment on?
    • 1888, Thomas Hardy, “The Withered Arm” in Wessex Tales, London: Macmillan & Co., 1903, p. 102, [1]
      [] in it lay the body of a young man, wearing the smockfrock of a rustic, and fustian breeches.
    • 1972, Edna O’Brien, Night, New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1987, p. 103,
      Her husband was trying to calm her down, assuage her, and in the end what she did was to put a handkerchief over her face and secure it with the brim of a fustian hat.
    • 2009, Giorgio Riello, “The Indian Apprenticeship: The Trade of Indian Textiles and the Making of European Cottons” in Giorgio Riello and Tirthankar Roy (eds.), How India Clothed the World: The World of South Asian Textiles, 1500-1850, Leiden: Brill, p. 334
      The East India company was pursuing its own financial interests, but in doing so was also fostering the establishment of industries such as calico printing — an industry that would have not achieved the same degree of accomplishment if it had confined itself simply to the printing of European fustians (mixed cottons) and linens, both of which were more difficult to print on than cotton.
  2. A class of cloth including corduroy and velveteen.
  3. Pompous, inflated or pretentious writing or speech.
    • 1715, Alexander Pope, Preface to The Iliad of Homer, in Alexander Pope, Selected Poetry and Prose, edited by Robin Sowerby, London: Routledge, 1988, p. 105,
      Nothing that belongs to Homer seems to have been more commonly mistaken than the just pitch of his style, some of his translators having swelled into fustian in a proud confidence of the sublime, others sunk into flatness in a cold and timorous notion of simplicity.
    • 1721, Joseph Addison, “Dialogues upon the Usefulness of Ancient Medals”, Dialogue II, in The Works of the Right Honourable Joseph Addison, Esq., Vol. I, p. 490, [3]
      Claudian in the description of his infant Titan descants on this glory about his head, but has run his description into most wretched fustian.
    • 1926, Harold L. Van Doren, Paul Cézanne: His Life and Art, p. 49; a translation of Ambroise Vollard, Paul Cézanne, 1914, Paris, Éditions G. Crès.
      What made Manet a veritable prophet in his day, was that he brought a simple formula to a period in which the official art was merely fustian and conventionality.
  4. (archaic) A drink made of white wine with egg yolk, lemon, and spices.

Translations

See also

  • jackanapes

References

  • fustian at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • fustian in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Faustin, faunist, fiaunts, infaust

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