blaspheme vs curse what difference

what is difference between blaspheme and curse

English

Etymology

From Middle English blasfemen, blasphemen, from Old French blasfemer, from Ecclesiastical Latin blasphēmō, from Ancient Greek βλασφημέω (blasphēméō). Doublet of blame.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌblæsˈfiːm/, /ˌblɑːsˈfiːm/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈblæs.fim/

Verb

blaspheme (third-person singular simple present blasphemes, present participle blaspheming, simple past and past participle blasphemed)

  1. (intransitive) To commit blasphemy; to speak against God or religious doctrine.
    • 1980, The Blues Brothers:
      Mrs. Murphy: Don’t you blaspheme in here!
  2. (transitive) To speak of, or address, with impious irreverence; to revile impiously (anything sacred).
    • a. 1708, William Beveridge, A Form of Sound Words to be used by Ministers
      How long, O Lord, holy and true, dost thou not judge and avenge thyself on all those who thus continually blaspheme thy great and all-glorious name?
  3. (transitive) To calumniate; to revile; to abuse.

Related terms

  • blasphemer
  • blasphemingly
  • blasphemous
  • blasphemously
  • blasphemy

Translations

Noun

blaspheme (plural blasphemes)

  1. Obsolete spelling of blasphemy

Latin

Adjective

blasphēme

  1. vocative masculine singular of blasphēmus

Middle English

Etymology 1

Verb

blaspheme

  1. Alternative form of blasfemen

Etymology 2

Noun

blaspheme

  1. Alternative form of blasfeme

Adjective

blaspheme

  1. Alternative form of blasfeme

Etymology 3

Noun

blaspheme

  1. Alternative form of blasfemye


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kɜːs/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /kɝs/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)s

Etymology 1

From Middle English curse, kors, cors, curs, from Old English cors, curs (curse), of unknown origin.

Noun

curse (plural curses)

  1. A supernatural detriment or hindrance; a bane.
  2. A prayer or imprecation that harm may befall someone.
  3. The cause of great harm, evil, or misfortune; that which brings evil or severe affliction; torment.
  4. A vulgar epithet.
  5. (slang, dated, derogatory, usually with “the”) A woman’s menses.
Derived terms
  • curse of Scotland
Descendants
  • Sranan Tongo: kosi
Translations
  • This translation table is meant for translations approximating the derogatory or strongly negative nature of this term in English. For standard translations, see the translation table at menstruation.

Etymology 2

From Middle English cursen, corsen, coursen, from Old English corsian, cursian (to curse), from the noun (see above).

Verb

curse (third-person singular simple present curses, present participle cursing, simple past and past participle cursed or (archaic) curst)

  1. (transitive) To place a curse upon (a person or object).
  2. To call upon divine or supernatural power to send injury upon; to imprecate evil upon; to execrate.
  3. (transitive) To speak or shout a vulgar curse or epithet.
  4. (intransitive) To use offensive or morally inappropriate language.
    Synonym: swear
  5. To bring great evil upon; to be the cause of serious harm or unhappiness to; to furnish with that which will be a cause of deep trouble; to afflict or injure grievously; to harass or torment.
Antonyms
  • bless
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Sranan Tongo: kosi
Translations

Anagrams

  • Cruse, Cures, Sucre, crues, cruse, cuers, cures, ecrus, sucre

Latin

Participle

curse

  1. vocative masculine singular of cursus

Portuguese

Verb

curse

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of cursar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of cursar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of cursar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of cursar

Romanian

Noun

curse f pl

  1. plural of cursă

Spanish

Verb

curse

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of cursar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of cursar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of cursar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of cursar.

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