blast vs blow what difference

what is difference between blast and blow

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: bläst, IPA(key): /blɑːst/
  • (US) enPR: blăst, IPA(key): /blæst/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːst
  • Rhymes: -æst

Etymology 1

From Middle English blast from Old English blǣst (blowing, blast), from Proto-Germanic *blēstaz, *blēstuz (blowing, blast). Cognate with obsolete German Blast (wind, blowing). More at blow.

Noun

blast (plural blasts)

  1. A violent gust of wind.
    • And see where surly Winter passes off, / Far to the north, and calls his ruffian blasts; / His blasts obey, and quit the howling hill.
  2. A forcible stream of gas or liquid from an orifice, for example from a bellows, the mouth, etc.
  3. A hit from a pipe.
  4. The continuous blowing to which one charge of ore or metal is subjected in a furnace
    many tons of iron were melted at a blast
    • 1957, H.R. Schubert, History of the British Iron and Steel Industry, p. 146:
      Blast was produced by bellows worked by four ‘blowers’, three of whom worked at a time while the fourth stood ready to replace one of the others.
  5. The exhaust steam from an engine, driving a column of air out of a boiler chimney, and thus creating an intense draught through the fire; also, any draught produced by the blast.
  6. An explosion, especially for the purpose of destroying a mass of rock, etc.
  7. An explosive charge for blasting.
    • 1852-1854, Charles Tomlinson, Cyclopaedia of Useful Arts
      Large blasts are often used.
  8. A loud, sudden sound.
    • c. 1832, William Cullen Bryant, The Battle-Field
      the blast of triumph o’er thy grave
  9. A sudden, pernicious effect, as if by a noxious wind, especially on animals and plants; a blight.
    • By the blast of God they perish, and by the breath of his nostrils are they consumed.
  10. (figuratively, informal) A good time; an enjoyable moment.
    We had a blast at the party last night.
  11. (marketing) A promotional message sent to an entire mailing list.
    an e-mail blast; a fax blast
  12. A flatulent disease of sheep.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English blasten, blesten, from Old English blǣstan (to blow, blast), from Proto-Germanic *blēstijaną. Compare Middle High German blesten (to stand out, plop, splash).

Verb

blast (third-person singular simple present blasts, present participle blasting, simple past and past participle blasted)

  1. (transitive) To make an impression on, by making a loud blast or din.
  2. (intransitive) To make a loud noise.
  3. (transitive) To shatter, as if by an explosion.
  4. (transitive) To open up a hole in, usually by means of a sudden and imprecise method (such as an explosion).
    Blast right through it.
  5. (transitive) To curse; to damn.
    Blast it! Foiled again.
  6. (transitive, science fiction) To shoot, especially with an energy weapon (as opposed to one which fires projectiles).
    Chewbacca blasted the Stormtroopers with his laser rifle.
  7. (soccer) To shoot; kick the ball in hope of scoring a goal.
  8. To criticize or reprimand severely; to verbally discipline or punish.
    My manager suddenly blasted me yesterday for being a little late to work for five days in a row, because I was never getting myself up on time.
  9. (transitive) To bring destruction or ruin on; to destroy.
  10. (transitive) To blight or wither.
    A cold wind blasted the rose plants.
  11. (intransitive, obsolete) To be blighted or withered.
    The bud blasted in the blossom.
  12. (intransitive, obsolete) To blow, for example on a trumpet.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Italian: blastare
Translations

Interjection

blast

  1. (chiefly British, informal) To show displeasure or disappointment; damn
Usage notes

Can be used on its own or in the form “blast it!”.

Translations

Etymology 3

From Ancient Greek βλαστός (blastós, germ or sprout).

Noun

blast (plural blasts)

  1. (cytology) An immature or undifferentiated cell (e.g., lymphoblast, myeloblast).
Derived terms
  • blast cell
  • blastocyte
  • blastoma
Translations

Etymology 4

From BLAST (an acronym for Basic Local Alignment Search Tool).

Verb

blast (third-person singular simple present blasts, present participle blasting, simple past and past participle blasted)

  1. (biology, informal, transitive) To run a nucleotide sequence (for nucleic acids) or an amino acid sequence (for proteins) through a BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool).
    • 2004, Andreas Bommarius and Bettina Riebel-Bommarius, Biocatalysis: Fundamentals and Applications, p. 425:
      Blasting nucleotide sequences is not always that easy, because there is more ambiguity to the nucleotide sequence, and good hits have to have a 70% homology over the whole sequence to be reliable, compared to 25% with proteins.

Alternative forms

  • BLAST

Anagrams

  • Balts, blats

German

Verb

blast

  1. inflection of blasen:
    1. second-person plural present
    2. plural imperative

Irish

Etymology

From Ancient Greek βλαστός (blastós, germ, sprout).

Noun

blast m (genitive singular blast, nominative plural blastaí)

  1. (cytology) blast

Declension

Derived terms

  • -blast
  • blastchill (blast cell)

Mutation


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • blaste, blæst, blest

Etymology

From Old English blǣst, from Proto-West Germanic *blāstu, from Proto-Germanic *blēstuz; equivalent to blasen +‎ -th.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blast/, /blɛːst/

Noun

blast (plural blastes)

  1. A blast; a sudden and forceful motion of wind.
  2. One’s breathing or respiring; the act of respiration.
  3. The blast produced by a musical instrument.
  4. An emission or expulsion of fire or flames.
  5. The sound produced by thunder or storms.
  6. (rare) The making of a pronouncement or proclamation.
  7. (rare) One’s spiritual essence; the soul.
  8. (rare) A striking or attack.
  9. (rare) Flatulence; the making of a fart.

Derived terms

  • blasten

Descendants

  • English: blast
  • Scots: blast

References

  • “blast, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-09-27.

Swedish

Noun

blast c (definite form blasten)

  1. (uncountable) The stem and leaves of a vegetable, of which you’re only supposed to eat the root. E.g. in potatoes or carrots.


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bləʊ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /bloʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ

Etymology 1

From Middle English blowen, from Old English blāwan (to blow, breathe, inflate, sound), from Proto-West Germanic *blāan, from Proto-Germanic *blēaną (to blow) (compare German blähen), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleh₁- (to swell, blow up) (compare Latin flō (to blow) and Old Armenian բեղուն (bełun, fertile)).

Verb

blow (third-person singular simple present blows, present participle blowing, simple past blew, past participle blown)

  1. (intransitive) To produce an air current.
    • 1653, Izaak Walton, The Compleat Angler
      Hark how it rains and blows!
  2. (transitive) To propel by an air current (or, if under water, a water current), usually with the mouth.
  3. (intransitive) To be propelled by an air current.
  4. (transitive) To create or shape by blowing; as in to blow bubbles, to blow glass.
  5. (transitive) To force a current of air upon with the mouth, or by other means.
  6. (transitive) To clear of contents by forcing air through.
  7. (transitive) To cause to make sound by blowing, as a musical instrument.
  8. (intransitive) To make a sound as the result of being blown.
  9. (intransitive, of a cetacean) To exhale visibly through the spout the seawater which it has taken in while feeding.
  10. (intransitive) To explode.
  11. (transitive, with “up” or with prep phrase headed by “to”) To cause to explode, shatter, or be utterly destroyed.
  12. (transitive) To cause the sudden destruction of.
  13. (intransitive) To suddenly fail destructively.
  14. (intransitive) (used to express displeasure or frustration) Damn.
  15. (intransitive, slang, sometimes considered vulgar) To be very undesirable.
    Synonym: suck
  16. (transitive, slang) To recklessly squander.
  17. (transitive, vulgar) To fellate; to perform oral sex on (usually a man).
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:give head
  18. (transitive, slang) To leave, especially suddenly or in a hurry.
  19. (transitive) To make flyblown, to defile, especially with fly eggs.
  20. (obsolete) To spread by report; to publish; to disclose.
    • Through the court his courtesy was blown.
  21. (obsolete) To inflate, as with pride; to puff up.
  22. (intransitive) To breathe hard or quick; to pant; to puff.
  23. (transitive) To put out of breath; to cause to blow from fatigue.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)
  24. (dated) To talk loudly; boast; storm.
    • a. 1940, Mildred Haun, “Shin-Bone Rocks” in The Hawk’s Done Gone p. 218:
      He didn’t just set around and try to out sweettalk somebody; he got out and out-fit somebody. He wouldn’t be blowing when he told his boys how he fit for the woman he got.
    • 1969, Charles Ambrose McCarthy, The Great Molly Maguire Hoax (page 113)
      At the breaking edge with him and completely fed up with his everlasting bragging and blowing about his personal exploits, and desirous of putting him somewhere, anywhere, so they wouldn’t be continuously annoyed by him, []
    • 1976, David Toulmin, Blown Seed (page 148)
      Audie never liked him because he was further in with old Craig than he was, bragging and blowing about his work and the things he could do, while Audie sat quiet as a mouse listening to his blab.
  25. (slang, informal, African-American Vernacular) To sing.
  26. (Scientology, intransitive) To leave the Church of Scientology in an unauthorized manner.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

blow (plural blows)

  1. A strong wind.
  2. (informal) A chance to catch one’s breath.
  3. (uncountable, US, slang) Cocaine.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:cocaine
  4. (uncountable, Britain, slang) Cannabis.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:marijuana
  5. (uncountable, US Chicago Regional, slang) Heroin.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:heroin
  6. (informal, vulgar) A blowjob; fellatio
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:oral sex
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English blo, bloo, from Old English blāw (blue), from Proto-Germanic *blēwaz (blue, dark blue, grey, black), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlēw- (yellow, blond, grey). Cognate with Latin flavus (yellow). Doublet of blue.

Adjective

blow (comparative blower or more blow, superlative blowest or most blow)

  1. (now chiefly dialectal, Northern England) Blue.

Etymology 3

From Middle English blowe, blaw, northern variant of blēwe, from Proto-Germanic *blewwaną (to beat) (compare Old Norse blegði (wedge), German einbläuen, Middle Dutch blouwen). Related to block.

Noun

blow (plural blows)

  1. The act of striking or hitting.
    Synonyms: bace, strike, hit, punch
  2. A sudden or forcible act or effort; an assault.
    • 1838-1842′, Thomas Arnold, History of Rome
      A vigorous blow might win [Hanno’s camp].
  3. A damaging occurrence.
    Synonyms: disaster, calamity
  4. (Australia, shearing, historical) A cut made to a sheep’s fleece by a shearer using hand-shears.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English blowen, from Old English blōwan, from Proto-Germanic *blōaną (compare Dutch bloeien, German blühen), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleh₃- (compare Latin florēre (to bloom)).

Verb

blow (third-person singular simple present blows, present participle blowing, simple past blew, past participle blown)

  1. To blossom; to cause to bloom or blossom.
Derived terms
  • full-blown
Translations

Noun

blow (plural blows)

  1. A mass or display of flowers; a yield.
  2. A display of anything brilliant or bright.
  3. A bloom, state of flowering.
Related terms
  • ablow
  • elder-blow
Translations

Anagrams

  • bowl

Middle English

Verb

blow

  1. Alternative form of blowen (to blow)

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