blaze vs brilliance what difference

what is difference between blaze and brilliance

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bleɪz/
  • Rhymes: -eɪz

Etymology 1

From Middle English blase, from Old English blæse, blase (firebrand, torch, lamp, flame), from Proto-Germanic *blasǭ (torch), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to shine, be white). Cognate with Low German blas (burning candle, torch, fire), Middle High German blas (candle, torch, flame). Compare Dutch bles (blaze), German Blesse (blaze, mark on an animal’s forehead), Swedish bläs (blaze).

Noun

blaze (plural blazes)

  1. A fire, especially a fast-burning fire producing a lot of flames and light.
    • Long after his cigar burnt bitter, he sat with eyes fixed on the blaze. When the flames at last began to flicker and subside, his lids fluttered, then drooped; but he had lost all reckoning of time when he opened them again to find Miss Erroll in furs and ball-gown kneeling on the hearth and heaping kindling on the coals, [].
  2. Intense, direct light accompanied with heat.
  3. The white or lighter-coloured markings on a horse’s face.
  4. A high-visibility orange colour, typically used in warning signs and hunters’ clothing.
  5. A bursting out, or active display of any quality; an outburst.
  6. A spot made on trees by chipping off a piece of the bark, usually as a surveyor’s mark.
  7. (poker) A hand consisting of five face cards.
Derived terms
  • ablaze
  • blazen
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English blasen, from Middle English blase (torch). See above.

Verb

blaze (third-person singular simple present blazes, present participle blazing, simple past and past participle blazed)

  1. (intransitive) To be on fire, especially producing bright flames.
  2. (intransitive) To send forth or reflect a bright light; shine like a flame.
    • 1793, William Wordsworth, Descriptive Sketches
      And far and wide the icy summit blaze.
  3. (intransitive, poetic) To be conspicuous; shine brightly a brilliancy (of talents, deeds, etc.).
  4. (transitive, rare) To set in a blaze; burn.
  5. (transitive) To cause to shine forth; exhibit vividly; be resplendent with.
  6. (transitive, only in the past participle) To mark with a white spot on the face (as a horse).
  7. (transitive) To set a mark on (as a tree, usually by cutting off a piece of its bark).
  8. (transitive) To indicate or mark out (a trail, especially through vegetation) by a series of blazes.
  9. (transitive, figuratively) To set a precedent for the taking-on of a challenge; lead by example.
  10. (figuratively) To be furiously angry; to speak or write in a rage.
    • 1929, Reginald Charles Barker, The Hair-trigger Brand (page 160)
      “I’ll die before I let my grandad pay you that much money!” blazed the girl.
  11. (slang) To smoke marijuana.
Related terms
  • ablaze
  • blaze a trail
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English blasen (to blow), from Old English *blǣsan, from Proto-Germanic *blēsaną (to blow). Related to English blast.

Verb

blaze (third-person singular simple present blazes, present participle blazing, simple past and past participle blazed)

  1. (transitive) To blow, as from a trumpet
  2. (transitive) To publish; announce publicly
  3. (transitive) To disclose; bewray; defame
  4. (transitive, heraldry) To blazon

Noun

blaze (plural blazes)

  1. Publication; the act of spreading widely by report

References

  • blaze at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • blaze in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Elbaz, Zabel

Czech

Etymology

From blahý +‎ -e.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈblazɛ]
  • Rhymes: -azɛ
  • Hyphenation: bla‧ze

Adverb

blaze (comparative blažeji, superlative nejblažeji)

  1. blissfully, happily

Related terms

  • blaženě
  • šťastně
  • mile

Related terms

Further reading

  • blaze in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • blaze in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈblaːzə]

Verb

blaze

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of blazen

Anagrams

  • bazel

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian *blēsa, from Proto-West Germanic *blāsan, from Proto-Germanic *blēsaną.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈblazə/

Verb

blaze

  1. to blow

Inflection

Further reading

  • “blaze (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Yola

Alternative forms

  • bleaze

Etymology

Possibly from Middle English blase, from Old English blase.

Noun

blaze

  1. a faggot

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: brĭlyəns
  • IPA(key): /ˈbɹɪljən(t)s/

Etymology

Borrowed from French brillance.

Noun

brilliance (usually uncountable, plural brilliances)

  1. The quality of being exceptionally effulgent (giving off light).
  2. The quality of having extraordinary mental capacity.
  3. (chiefly Britain) Magnificence; resplendence.

Derived terms

  • brilliancy

Related terms

  • brilliant
  • brilliantly
  • brilliantness
  • beryl (possibly)
  • beryllium (possibly)

Translations


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