bleak vs raw what difference

what is difference between bleak and raw

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bliːk/
  • Rhymes: -iːk

Etymology 1

From Middle English bleke (also bleche > English bleach (pale, bleak)), and bleike (due to Old Norse), and earlier Middle English blak, blac (pale, wan), from Old English blǣc, blǣċ, blāc (bleak, pale, pallid, wan, livid; bright, shining, glittering, flashing) and Old Norse bleikr (pale, whitish), from Proto-Germanic *blaikaz (pale, shining). Cognate with Dutch bleek (pale, wan, pallid), Low German blek (pale), German bleich (pale, wan, sallow), Danish bleg (pale), Swedish blek (pale, pallid), Norwegian Bokmål bleik, blek (pale), Norwegian Nynorsk bleik (pale), Faroese bleikur (pale), Icelandic bleikur (pale, pink).

Adjective

bleak (comparative bleaker, superlative bleakest)

  1. Without color; pale; pallid.
    • When she came out she looked as pale and as bleak as one that were laid out dead.
  2. Desolate and exposed; swept by cold winds.
    • 1793, William Wordsworth, Descriptive Sketches
      Wastes too bleak to rear / The common growth of earth, the foodful ear.
  3. Unhappy; cheerless; miserable; emotionally desolate.
Synonyms
  • (sickly pale): see also Thesaurus:pallid
Derived terms
  • bleaken
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bleke (small river fish, bleak, blay), perhaps an alteration (due to English blǣc (bright) or Old Norse bleikja) of Old English blǣġe (bleak, blay, gudgeon); or perhaps from a diminutive of Middle English *bleye (blay), equivalent to blay +‎ -ock or blay +‎ -kin. See blay.

Noun

bleak (plural bleaks or bleak)

  1. A small European river fish (Alburnus alburnus), of the family Cyprinidae.
Synonyms
  • ablet
  • alburn
  • blay
Derived terms
  • sunbleak
Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Balke, Blake, Kabel, Kaleb, blake


English

Etymology

From Middle English rawe, raw, rau, from Old English hrēaw (raw, uncooked), from Proto-West Germanic *hrau, from Proto-Germanic *hrawaz, *hrēwaz (raw), from Proto-Indo-European *krewh₂- (raw meat, fresh blood). Cognate with Scots raw (raw), Dutch rauw (raw), German roh (raw), Swedish (raw), Icelandic hrár (raw), Latin crūdus (raw, bloody, uncooked), Irish cró (blood), Lithuanian kraujas (blood), Russian кровь (krovʹ, blood). Related also to Old English hrēow, hrēoh (rough, fierce, wild, angry, disturbed, troubled, sad, stormy, tempestuous). More at ree.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: , IPA(key): /ɹɔː/
Rhymes: -ɔː
  • (US) enPR: , IPA(key): /ɹɔ/
  • (cotcaught merger) enPR: , IPA(key): /ɹɒ/
  • (cotcaught merger, fatherbother merger) enPR: , IPA(key): /ɹɑ/
  • Homophones: roar (in non-rhotic accents), rah (with cot-caught merger and father-bother merger)

Adjective

raw (comparative rawer, superlative rawest)

  1. (cooking) (of food) Not cooked. [from 9th c.]
  2. (of materials, products, etc.) Not treated or processed; in a natural state, unrefined, unprocessed. [from 10th c.]
  3. Having had the skin removed or abraded; chafed, tender; exposed, lacerated. [from 14th c.]
  4. New or inexperienced. [from 16th c.]
  5. Crude in quality; rough, uneven, unsophisticated. [from 16th c.]
  6. (statistics, of data) Uncorrected, without analysis. [from 20th c.]
    • 2010, “Under the volcano”, The Economist, 16 Oct 2010:
      What makes Mexico worrying is not just the raw numbers but the power of the cartels over society.
  7. (of weather) Unpleasantly cold or damp.
  8. (of an emotion, personality, etc.) Unmasked, undisguised, strongly expressed
  9. Candid in a representation of unpleasant facts, conditions, etc.
  10. (of language) Unrefined, crude, or insensitive, especially with reference to sexual matters
  11. (obsolete) Not covered; bare; bald.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:raw

Derived terms

  • rawly
  • rawness
  • raw data
  • raw sugar

Translations

Adverb

raw

  1. (slang) Without a condom.

Synonyms

  • (without a condom): Thesaurus:condomless

Translations

Noun

raw (plural raws)

  1. (sugar refining, sugar trade) An unprocessed sugar; a batch of such.
    • 1800, Louisiana Sugar Planters’ Association, Lousiana Sugar Chemists’ Association, American Cane Growers’ Association, The Louisiana Planter and Sugar Manufacturer, Volume 22, page 287,
      With the recent advance in London yellow crystals, however, the disproportion of the relative value of these two kinds has been considerably reduced, and a better demand for crystallized raws should consequently occur.
    • 1921, American Chemical Society, The Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Volume 13, Part 1, page 149,
      Early in the year the raws were melted to about 20 Brix in order to facilitate filtration.
    • 1939, The Commercial and Financial Chronicle, Volume 148, Part 2, page 2924,
      The world sugar contract closed 1 to 3 points net higher, with sales of only 36 lots. London raws sold at 8s. 4½d., and futures there were unchanged to 3d. higher.
  2. A galled place; an inveterate sore.
  3. (by extension, figuratively) A point about which a person is particularly sensitive.
    • 1934, Harold Heslop, Goaf (page 29)
      In a moment Tom was angry. The women saw that Bill had touched him upon the raw, and they went out of the room to prepare a meal.
  4. (anime fandom slang) A recording or rip of a show that has not been fansubbed.
  5. (manga fandom slang) A scan that has not been cleaned (purged of blemishes arising from the scanning process) and has not been scanlated.

Translations

Anagrams

  • RWA, Rwa, WAR, WRA, War, War., war, war-

Anguthimri

Adjective

raw

  1. (Mpakwithi) black

References

  • Terry Crowley, The Mpakwithi dialect of Anguthimri (1981), page 188

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English hrēaw.

Noun

raw

  1. Alternative form of rawe (raw)

Etymology 2

From Old English rǣw, rāw.

Noun

raw

  1. Alternative form of rewe (row)

Welsh

Noun

raw

  1. Soft mutation of rhaw.

Mutation

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial