bleak vs stark what difference

what is difference between bleak and stark

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bliːk/
  • Rhymes: -iːk

Etymology 1

From Middle English bleke (also bleche > English bleach (pale, bleak)), and bleike (due to Old Norse), and earlier Middle English blak, blac (pale, wan), from Old English blǣc, blǣċ, blāc (bleak, pale, pallid, wan, livid; bright, shining, glittering, flashing) and Old Norse bleikr (pale, whitish), from Proto-Germanic *blaikaz (pale, shining). Cognate with Dutch bleek (pale, wan, pallid), Low German blek (pale), German bleich (pale, wan, sallow), Danish bleg (pale), Swedish blek (pale, pallid), Norwegian Bokmål bleik, blek (pale), Norwegian Nynorsk bleik (pale), Faroese bleikur (pale), Icelandic bleikur (pale, pink).

Adjective

bleak (comparative bleaker, superlative bleakest)

  1. Without color; pale; pallid.
    • When she came out she looked as pale and as bleak as one that were laid out dead.
  2. Desolate and exposed; swept by cold winds.
    • 1793, William Wordsworth, Descriptive Sketches
      Wastes too bleak to rear / The common growth of earth, the foodful ear.
  3. Unhappy; cheerless; miserable; emotionally desolate.
Synonyms
  • (sickly pale): see also Thesaurus:pallid
Derived terms
  • bleaken
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bleke (small river fish, bleak, blay), perhaps an alteration (due to English blǣc (bright) or Old Norse bleikja) of Old English blǣġe (bleak, blay, gudgeon); or perhaps from a diminutive of Middle English *bleye (blay), equivalent to blay +‎ -ock or blay +‎ -kin. See blay.

Noun

bleak (plural bleaks or bleak)

  1. A small European river fish (Alburnus alburnus), of the family Cyprinidae.
Synonyms
  • ablet
  • alburn
  • blay
Derived terms
  • sunbleak
Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Balke, Blake, Kabel, Kaleb, blake


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: stärk, IPA(key): /stɑɹk/
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: stärk, IPA(key): /stɑːk/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(r)k

Etymology 1

From Middle English stark, starc, from Old English stearc, starc (stiff, rigid, unyielding, obstinate, hard, strong, severe, violent), from Proto-West Germanic *stark, from Proto-Germanic *starkuz (stiff, strong), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)terg- (rigid, stiff). Cognate with Saterland Frisian sterc (strong), Dutch sterk (strong), Low German sterk (strong), German stark (strong), Danish stærk (strong), Swedish stark (strong), Norwegian sterk (strong), Icelandic sterkur (strong). Related to starch.

In the phrase stark naked: an alternation of start (“tail” or “rump”), a literal parallel to the modern butt naked.

Adjective

stark (comparative starker, superlative starkest)

  1. (obsolete) Hard, firm; obdurate.
  2. Severe; violent; fierce (now usually in describing the weather).
  3. (poetic, literary or archaic) Strong; vigorous; powerful.
    • Stark beer, boy, stout and strong beer.
  4. Stiff, rigid.
    • The north is not so stark and cold.
  5. Plain in appearance; barren, desolate.
  6. Naked.
  7. Complete, absolute, full.
    • Consider, first, the stark security / The commonwealth is in now.
    • 1689 (first published posthumously), John Selden, Table-Talk
      Rhetoric is very good or stark naught; there’s no medium in rhetoric.
    • Ramadans, and prolonged ham-squattings in cold, cheerless rooms were stark nonsense
Derived terms
  • starken
Translations

Adverb

stark (not comparable)

  1. starkly; entirely, absolutely
    • [] held him strangled in his arms till he was stark dead.
Usage notes

In standard modern English, the adverb is essentially restricted to stark naked and phrases meaning “crazy” on the pattern of stark raving mad.

Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English starken, from Old English stearcian (to stiffen, become hard, grow stiff or hard), from Proto-Germanic *starkōną, *starkēną (to stiffen, become hard), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)terg- (rigid, stiff). Cognate with German erstarken (to strengthen).

Verb

stark (third-person singular simple present starks, present participle starking, simple past and past participle starked)

  1. (obsolete or dialect) To stiffen.
Related terms
  • starkish
  • starkly
  • starkers

Anagrams

  • Karst, Trask, karst, karts, skart

German

Etymology

From Middle High German stark, from Old High German stark, from Proto-Germanic *starkuz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃtark/, [ʃtaʁk], [ʃtaɐ̯k], [ʃtaːk]

Adjective

stark (comparative stärker, superlative am stärksten)

  1. strong (intense, powerful, unyielding)
  2. strong (having a high concentration of some ingredient, e.g. alcohol)
  3. (grammar) strong (inflecting according to a pattern distinct from another called “weak”)
    Coordinate terms: gemischt, schwach
  4. (colloquial, slightly dated) great, brilliant, awesome
  5. (colloquial, dated) incredible, unbelievable

Declension

Further reading

  • “stark” in Duden online
  • “stark” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • Friedrich Kluge (1883), “stark”, in John Francis Davis, transl., Etymological Dictionary of the German Language, published 1891

Kashubian

Etymology

Ultimately from Proto-Slavic *starъ.

Noun

stark m

  1. grandfather

Related terms

  • starka

Low German

Etymology

Cognate with German stark, Dutch sterk.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stark/, /staːk/

Adjective

stark (comparative starker, superlative starkst)

  1. strong, powerful

Declension

Synonyms

  • dull
  • heftig
  • hevig
  • ossig
  • slimm
  • stevig
  • dannig
  • düchtig
  • swied

Derived terms

  • Starkde/Stärkde

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *starkuz, whence also Old English stearc, Old Norse sterkr.

Adjective

stark

  1. strong

Derived terms

  • starchī

Descendants

  • German: stark
  • Yiddish: שטאַרק(shtark)

Slovene

Noun

stark

  1. genitive dual/plural of starka

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish starker, from Old Norse starkr, from Proto-Germanic *starkuz, from Proto-Indo-European *sterg-.

Pronunciation

Adjective

stark (comparative starkare, superlative starkast)

  1. strong; able to use great force
  2. strong; capable of withstanding great physical force
  3. strong; highly stimulating to the senses
    starkt ljus

    strong light
  4. (taste) spicy, hot; with a biting taste
    Den maten är för stark för mig.

    That food is too hot for me.
  5. strong; having a high concentration of an essential; possibly alcohol
    starkt kaffe

    strong coffee
  6. (grammar) strong
  7. (military) strong; not easily subdued or taken

Declension

Synonyms

  • (able to use great force): kraftfull
  • (capable of withstanding force): stadig
  • (spicy): het
  • (having intense odor or flavor): frän, skarp, stickande

Related terms

  • styrka
  • stärka
  • styrkelyft
  • starkt verb, stark böjning

See also

  • oregelbundet verb

Anagrams

  • raskt

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