blemish vs defect what difference

what is difference between blemish and defect

English

Etymology

From Middle English blemisshen, blemissen, from Old French blemiss-, stem of Old French blemir, blesmir (make pale, injure, wound, bruise) (French blêmir), from Old Frankish *blesmjan, *blasmijan (to make pale), from Old Frankish *blasmi (pale), from Proto-Germanic *blasaz (white, pale), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to shine). Cognate with Dutch bles (white spot), German blass (pale), Old English āblered (bare, uncovered, bald, shaven).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈblɛmɪʃ/
  • Hyphenation: blem‧ish

Noun

blemish (plural blemishes)

  1. A small flaw which spoils the appearance of something, a stain, a spot.
    • 1769, Oxford Standard Text, King James Bible, Leviticus, 22, xix,
      Ye shall offer at your own will a male without blemish, of the beeves, of the sheep, or of the goats.
    • 1997, Jean Soler, 5: The Semiotics of Food in the Bible, Carole Counihan, Penny Van Esterik (editors), Food and Culture: A Reader, page 61,
      Any foot shape deviating from this model is conceived as a blemish, and the animal is unclean.
    • 2003, A. K. Forrest, Chapter 6: Surface Defect Detection on Ceramics, Mark Graves, Bruce Batchelor (editors), Machine Vision for the Inspection of Natural Products, page 193,
      There are a very large number of types of blemish and the smallest blemish visible to a human can be surprisingly small, for example less than 10μm deep, which may be on the surface of a heavily embossed tile.
  2. A moral defect; a character flaw.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:defect

Related terms

  • blemished (adjective)
  • blemishless
  • blemishment

Translations

Verb

blemish (third-person singular simple present blemishes, present participle blemishing, simple past and past participle blemished)

  1. To spoil the appearance of.
    • 2009, Michael A. Kirkman, Chapter 2: Global Markets fo Processed Potato Products, Jaspreet Singh, Lovedeep Kaur (editors), Advances in Potato Chemistry and Technology, page 40,
      Generally, varieties in current use for processing are resilient, if not wholly resistant to blemishing diseases and disorders.
    • 2011, Rob Imrie, Emma Street, Architectural Design and Regulation, unnumbered page,
      I mean it reaches a point of ridiculousness in some regards, and one′s seen actually many good schemes here in San Francisco, for example, that have been blemished by an overly strict adherence to codes.
  2. To tarnish (reputation, character, etc.); to defame.
    • 1600, Francis Vere, Commentaries of the Divers Pieces of Service
      There had nothing passed betwixt us that might blemish reputation.

Translations



English

Etymology

From Middle French defaicte, from Latin defectus (a failure, lack), from deficere (to fail, lack, literally ‘undo’), from past participle defectus, from de- (priv.) + facere (to do).

Pronunciation

  • (noun) enPR: dē’fĕkt, IPA(key): /ˈdiːfɛkt/
  • (verb) enPR: dĭfĕkt’, IPA(key): /dɪˈfɛkt/

Noun

defect (plural defects)

  1. A fault or malfunction.
  2. The quantity or amount by which anything falls short.
    • 1824, Lydia Sigourney, Sketch of Connecticut
      and the indefatigable application with which they have supplied the defects of early culture.
  3. (mathematics) A part by which a figure or quantity is wanting or deficient.

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often used with “defect”: major, minor, serious, cosmetic, functional, critical, fatal, basic, fundamental, main, primary, principal, radical, inherent

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:defect

Related terms

  • defective
  • defeat
  • deficiency
  • deficient
  • deficit

Translations

Verb

defect (third-person singular simple present defects, present participle defecting, simple past and past participle defected)

  1. (intransitive) To abandon or turn against; to cease or change one’s loyalty, especially from a military organisation or political party.
    • 2013 May 23, Sarah Lyall, “British Leader’s Liberal Turn Sets Off a Rebellion in His Party,” New York Times (retrieved 29 May 2013):
      Capitalizing on the restive mood, Mr. Farage, the U.K. Independence Party leader, took out an advertisement in The Daily Telegraph this week inviting unhappy Tories to defect. In it Mr. Farage sniped that the Cameron government — made up disproportionately of career politicians who graduated from Eton and Oxbridge — was “run by a bunch of college kids, none of whom have ever had a proper job in their lives.”
  2. (military) To desert one’s army, to flee from combat.
  3. (military) To join the enemy army.
  4. (law) To flee one’s country and seek asylum.

Derived terms

  • defection
  • defector

Translations

Further reading

  • defect in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • defect in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin dēfectus, dēfectum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deːˈfɛkt/
  • Hyphenation: de‧fect
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt

Adjective

defect (comparative defecter, superlative defectst)

  1. broken, not working

Inflection

Synonyms

  • kapot

Descendants

  • Petjo: defèk

Noun

defect n (plural defecten, diminutive defectje n)

  1. A defect.

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