blench vs pale what difference

what is difference between blench and pale

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blɛnt͡ʃ/

Etymology 1

From Middle English blench and blenchen, from Old English blenċan (to deceive, cheat), from Proto-Germanic *blankijaną (to deceive), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleyǵ-. Cognate with Icelandic blekkja (to deceive, cheat, impose upon)..

Verb

blench (third-person singular simple present blenches, present participle blenching, simple past and past participle blenched)

  1. (intransitive) To shrink; start back; give way; flinch; turn aside or fly off.
    • a. 1870, William Cullen Bryant, The Battle-Field
      Blench not at thy chosen lot.
    • 1820, Francis Jeffrey, “Life of Curran”, in The Edinburgh Review May 1820
      This painful, heroic task he undertook, and never blenched from its fulfilment.
    • 1998, Andrew Hurley (translator), Jorge Louis Borges, “Ibn-Hakam al-Bokhari, Murdered in His Labyrnth”, Collected Fictions, Penguin Putnam, p.255
      “This,” said Dunraven with a vast gesture that did not blench at the cloudy stars, and that took in the black moors, the sea, and a majestic, tumbledown edifice that looked like a stable fallen upon hard times, “is my ancestral land.”
  2. (intransitive, of the eye) To quail.
  3. (transitive) To deceive; cheat.
  4. (transitive) To draw back from; shrink; avoid; elude; deny, as from fear.
    • 2012, Jan 13, Polly Toynbee, “Welfare cuts: Cameron’s problem is that people are nicer than he thinks”, The Guardian
      Yesterday the government proclaimed no turning back, but the lords representing the likes of the disability charity Scope or Macmillan Cancer Support should make them blench.
  5. (transitive) To hinder; obstruct; disconcert; foil.
  6. (intransitive) To fly off; to turn aside.

Noun

blench (plural blenches)

  1. A deceit; a trick.
  2. A sidelong glance.

Descendants

  • blanch (avoid)

Etymology 2

From Old French blanchir (to bleach).

Verb

blench (third-person singular simple present blenches, present participle blenching, simple past and past participle blenched)

  1. (obsolete) To blanch.
Related terms
  • blench holding
  • unblenching

References


Middle English

Noun

blench

  1. A deceit; a trick.
    • c. 1210, MS. Cotton Caligula A IX f.246.


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: pāl, IPA(key): /peɪɫ/
    • IPA(key): [pʰeɪ̯ɫ], [pʰeəɫ]
  • (US)
  • Rhymes: -eɪl
  • Homophone: pail

Etymology 1

From Middle English pale, from Old French pale, from Latin pallidus (pale, pallid). Doublet of pallid.

Adjective

pale (comparative paler, superlative palest)

  1. Light in color.
    • “Heavens!” exclaimed Nina, “the blue-stocking and the fogy!—and yours are pale blue, Eileen!—you’re about as self-conscious as Drina—slumping there with your hair tumbling à la Mérode! Oh, it’s very picturesque, of course, but a straight spine and good grooming is better. []
  2. (of human skin) Having a pallor (a light color, especially due to sickness, shock, fright etc.).
  3. Feeble, faint.
    He is but a pale shadow of his former self.
Synonyms
  • (human skin): See also Thesaurus:pallid
Derived terms
  • pale thrush
Translations

Verb

pale (third-person singular simple present pales, present participle paling, simple past and past participle paled)

  1. (intransitive) To turn pale; to lose colour.
  2. (intransitive) To become insignificant.
    • 12 July 2012, Sam Adams, AV Club Ice Age: Continental Drift
      The matter of whether the world needs a fourth Ice Age movie pales beside the question of why there were three before it, but Continental Drift feels less like an extension of a theatrical franchise than an episode of a middling TV cartoon, lolling around on territory that’s already been settled.
  3. (transitive) To make pale; to diminish the brightness of.
Derived terms
  • pale in comparison
Translations

Noun

pale

  1. (obsolete) Paleness; pallor.
    • 1593, William Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis, lines 589–592:
      The boare (quoth ſhe) whereat a ſuddain pale, / Like lawne being ſpred vpon the bluſhing roſe, / Vſurpes her cheeke, ſhe trembles at his tale, / And on his neck her yoaking armes ſhe throwes.

Etymology 2

From Middle English pale, pal, borrowed from Old French pal, from Latin pālus (stake, prop). English inherited the word pole (or, rather Old English pāl) from a much older Proto-Germanic borrowing of the same Latin word.

Doublet of peel and pole.

Noun

pale (plural pales)

  1. A wooden stake; a picket.
    • 1707, John Mortimer, The Whole Art of Husbandry, London: H. Mortlock & J. Robinson, 2nd edition, 1708, Chapter 1, pp. 11-12,[4]
      [] if you deſign it a Fence to keep in Deer, at every eight or ten Foot diſtance, ſet a Poſt with a Mortice in it to ſtand a little ſloping over the ſide of the Bank about two Foot high; and into the Mortices put a Rail [] and no Deer will go over it, nor can they creep through it, as they do often, when a Pale tumbles down.
  2. (archaic) Fence made from wooden stake; palisade.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1, Act IV, Scene 2,[5]
      How are we park’d and bounded in a pale,
      A little herd of England’s timorous deer,
      Mazed with a yelping kennel of French curs!
    • 1615, Ralph Hamor, A True Discourse of the Present Estate of Virginia, London: William Welby, p. 13,[6]
      Fourthly, they ſhall not vpon any occaſion whatſoeuer breake downe any of our pales, or come into any of our Townes or forts by any other waies, iſſues or ports then ordinary […].
  3. (by extension) Limits, bounds (especially before of).
    • 1645, John Milton, Il Penseroso, in The Poetical Works of Milton, volume II, Edinburgh: Sands, Murray, and Cochran, published 1755, p. 151, lines 155–160:[7]
      But let my due feet never fail, / To walk the ſtudious cloyſters pale, / And love the high embowed roof, / With antic pillars maſſy proof, / And ſtoried windows richly dight, / Caſting a dim religious light.
    • 1900, Jack London, The Son of the Wolf:The Wisdom of the Trail:
      Men so situated, beyond the pale of the honor and the law, are not to be trusted.
    • 1919, B. G. Jefferis and J. L. Nichols, Searchlights on Health:When and Whom to Marry:
      All things considered, we advise the male reader to keep his desires in check till he is at least twenty-five, and the female not to enter the pale of wedlock until she has attained the age of twenty.
  4. The bounds of morality, good behaviour or judgment in civilized company, in the phrase beyond the pale.
    • 2016 October 19, Jeff Flake, on Twitter:
      .@realDonaldTrump saying that he might not accept election results is beyond the pale.
  5. (heraldry) A vertical band down the middle of a shield.
  6. (archaic) A territory or defensive area within a specific boundary or under a given jurisdiction.
    1. (historical) The parts of Ireland under English jurisdiction.
    2. (historical) The territory around Calais under English control (from the 14th to 16th centuries).
      • 2009, Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall, Fourth Estate 2010, p. 402:
        He knows the fortifications – crumbling – and beyond the city walls the lands of the Pale, its woods, villages and marshes, its sluices, dykes and canals.
      • 2011, Thomas Penn, Winter King, Penguin 2012, p. 73:
        A low-lying, marshy enclave stretching eighteen miles along the coast and pushing some eight to ten miles inland, the Pale of Calais nestled between French Picardy to the west and, to the east, the imperial-dominated territories of Flanders.
    3. (historical) A portion of Russia in which Jews were permitted to live.
  7. (archaic) The jurisdiction (territorial or otherwise) of an authority.
  8. A cheese scoop.
  9. A shore for bracing a timber before it is fastened.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spencer to this entry?)
Translations

Verb

pale (third-person singular simple present pales, present participle paling, simple past and past participle paled)

  1. To enclose with pales, or as if with pales; to encircle or encompass; to fence off.
    • c. 1609, William Shakespeare, Cymbeline, Act III, Scene 1,[8]
      [] your iſle, which ſtands / As Neptunes Parke, ribb’d, and pal’d in / With Oakes vnſkaleable, and roaring Waters, / With Sands that will not bear your Enemies Boates, / But ſuck them vp to th’ Top-maſt.

Related terms

  • impale
  • palisade
  • pallescent

References

Anagrams

  • Alep, LEAP, Lape, Leap, Peal, e-pal, leap, peal, pela, plea

Afrikaans

Noun

pale

  1. plural of paal

Estonian

Noun

pale (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. cheek

Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


French

Etymology

From Latin pāla (shovel, spade).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pal/
  • Homophone: pâle (chiefly France)

Noun

pale f (plural pales)

  1. blade (of a propeller etc)
  2. vane (of a windmill etc)

Further reading

  • “pale” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • Alep, lape, lapé, pela

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French parler (talk, speak)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pa.le/

Verb

pale

  1. to talk, to speak

Italian

Noun

pale f

  1. plural of pala

Anagrams

  • alpe, pela

Jakaltek

Etymology

Borrowed from Spanish padre (father).

Noun

pale

  1. priest

References

  • Church, Clarence; Church, Katherine (1955) Vocabulario castellano-jacalteco, jacalteco-castellano[10] (in Spanish), Guatemala C. A.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 17; 39

Latin

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Ancient Greek πάλη (pálē).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈpa.leː/, [ˈpäɫ̪eː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈpa.le/, [ˈpɑːlɛ]

Noun

palē f (genitive palēs); first declension

  1. a wrestling
Declension

First-declension noun (Greek-type).

Etymology 2

Noun

pāle

  1. vocative singular of pālus

References

  • pale in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pale in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • pale in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pale in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Lindu

Noun

pale

  1. (anatomy) hand

Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpalɛ/, [ˈpalə]

Participle

pale

  1. third-person plural present of paliś

Norman

Etymology

From Old French pale, from Latin pallidus (pale, pallid).

Adjective

pale m or f

  1. (Jersey) pale

Synonyms

  • bliême

Northern Kurdish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɑːˈlɛ/

Noun

pale ?

  1. worker

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

pale n (definite singular paleet, indefinite plural pale or paleer, definite plural palea or paleene)

  1. alternative spelling of palé

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

pale n (definite singular paleet, indefinite plural pale, definite plural palea)

  1. alternative spelling of palé

Old French

Alternative forms

  • pasle
  • paule

Etymology

From Latin pallidus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpa.lə/

Adjective

pale m (oblique and nominative feminine singular pale)

  1. pale, whitish or having little color

Descendants

  • English: pale
  • French: pâle
  • Norman: pale (Jersey)

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpa.lɛ/
  • Homophone: palę

Noun

pale m

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative plural of pal

Noun

pale m

  1. locative/vocative singular of pał

Noun

pale f

  1. dative/locative singular of pała

Further reading

  • pale in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian

Verb

pale (Cyrillic spelling пале)

  1. third-person plural present of paliti

Swahili

Pronunciation

Adjective

pale

  1. Pa class inflected form of -le.

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