blighter vs chap what difference

what is difference between blighter and chap

English

Etymology

blight +‎ -er

Noun

blighter (plural blighters)

  1. One who blights.
  2. (Britain, often disrespectful) A person, usually male, especially one who behaves in an objectionable or pitiable manner.
    • 2012 March 27, David Seidler, “The King’s Speech play: At last, my crowning moment…,” The Independent (UK) (retrieved 27 Dec 2012):
      Translation: there’s still some hope for you, poor stammering blighter.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Gilbreth, therblig


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʃæp/
  • Rhymes: -æp

Etymology 1

Shortened from chapman (dealer, customer) in 16th century English.

Noun

chap (plural chaps)

  1. (dated outside Britain and Australia) A man, a fellow.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:man
  2. (Britain, dialectal) A customer, a buyer.
    • 1728, John Gay, The Beggar’s Opera Act 3
      If you have Blacks of any kind, brought in of late; Mantoes–Velvet Scarfs–Petticoats–Let it be what it will–I am your Chap–for all my Ladies are very fond of Mourning.
  3. (Southern US) A child.
Derived terms
  • chapess
  • chappie
  • chappo
Descendants
  • Pennsylvania German: Tschaepp (guy)
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English chappen (to split open, burst, chap), of uncertain origin. Compare Middle English choppen (to chop), Dutch kappen (to cut, chop, hack). Perhaps related to chip.

Verb

chap (third-person singular simple present chaps, present participle chapping, simple past and past participle chapped)

  1. (intransitive) Of the skin, to split or flake due to cold weather or dryness.
  2. (transitive) To cause to open in slits or chinks; to split; to cause the skin of to crack or become rough.
    • 1712, Richard Blackmore, Creation: A Philosophical Poem
      Then would unbalanced heat licentious reign, / Crack the dry hill, and chap the russet plain.
    • 1591, John Lyly, Endymion
      whose fair face neither the summer’s blaze can scorch nor winter’s blast chap.
  3. (Scotland, Northern England) To strike, knock.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      And then it seems that through the open door there came the chapping of a clock.
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, page 35:
      The door was shut into my class. I had to chap it and then Miss Rankine came and opened it and gived me an angry look []
Derived terms
  • chapped
  • chapstick
Translations

Noun

chap (plural chaps)

  1. A cleft, crack, or chink, as in the surface of the earth, or in the skin.
  2. (obsolete) A division; a breach, as in a party.
    • Many clefts and chaps in our council board.
  3. (Scotland) A blow; a rap.
Derived terms
  • chappy

Etymology 3

From Northern English chafts (jaws). Compare also Middle English cheppe (one side of the jaw, chap).

Noun

chap (plural chaps)

  1. (archaic, often in the plural) The jaw.
    • 1610, William Shakespeare, The Tempest
      This wide-chapp’d rascal—would thou might’st lie drowning / The washing of ten tides!
    • a. 1667, Abraham Cowley, The Song
      His chaps were all besmear’d with crimson blood.
  2. One of the jaws or cheeks of a vice, etc.
Related terms
  • chop
Translations

Etymology 4

Shortening

Noun

chap (plural chaps)

  1. (Internet slang) Clipping of chapter (division of a text).

See also

  • chaps

Anagrams

  • CHPA, HCAP, PHAC, Pach

Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

chap m (plural chappen, diminutive chappie n)

  1. Alternative spelling of sjap.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xap/

Verb

chap

  1. second-person singular imperative of chapać

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʃap/

Etymology

Late Middle English, from Old English *ċeappian, *ċieppan, from Proto-Germanic *kapp-, *kap- (to chop; cut; split), like also English chop. The ultimate origin is uncertain; possibly from Vulgar Latin *cuppare (to behead), from Latin caput (head) and influenced by Old French couper (to strike).

Akin to Saterland Frisian kappe, kapje (to hack; chop; lop off), Dutch kappen (to chop, cut, hew), Middle Low German koppen (to cut off, lop, poll), German Low German kappen (to cut off; clip), German kappen (to cut; clip), German dialectal chapfen (to chop into small pieces), Danish kappe (to cut, lop off, poll), Swedish kapa (to cut), Albanian copë (piece, chunk), Old English *ċippian (attested in forċippian (to cut off)).

Verb

chap

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To knock (on) or strike.

References


Semai

Alternative forms

  • cap

Etymology

From Proto-Mon-Khmer *cap ~ *caap (to seize). Cognate with Old Khmer cap (to seize, catch), Kuy caːp (“to catch, hold”).

Verb

chap

  1. to hold
  2. to catch; to seize
  3. to touch

Synonyms

  • (to hold): pegak
  • (to touch): lèèw

Derived terms

References


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