blind vs dim what difference

what is difference between blind and dim

English

Alternative forms

  • (archaic) blinde

Etymology

From Middle English blind, from Old English blind, from Proto-West Germanic *blind, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blaɪnd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd

Adjective

blind (comparative blinder, superlative blindest)

  1. (not comparable, of a person or animal) Unable to see, due to physiological or neurological factors.
    Synonym: sightless
    Antonyms: seeing, sighted
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island,
      He was plainly blind, for he tapped before him with a stick, and wore a great green shade over his eyes and nose…
  2. (not comparable, of an eye) Unable to be used to see, due to physiological or neurological factors.
  3. (comparable) Failing to see, acknowledge, perceive.
  4. (not comparable) Of a place, having little or no visibility.
  5. (not comparable) Closed at one end; having a dead end; exitless.
  6. (not comparable) Having no openings for light or passage; both dark and exitless.
  7. (in certain phrases, chiefly in the negative) Smallest or slightest.
  8. (not comparable) Without any prior knowledge.
  9. (not comparable) Unconditional; without regard to evidence, logic, reality, accidental mistakes, extenuating circumstances, etc.
    • 1787–1788, John Jay, The Federalist Papers
      This plan is recommended neither to blind approbation nor to blind reprobation.
  10. (sciences) Using blinded study design, wherein information is purposely limited to prevent bias.
  11. Unintelligible or illegible.
  12. (horticulture) Abortive; failing to produce flowers or fruit.
  13. (LGBT, slang) Uncircumcised

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • invisible (unable to be seen)
  • anosmic
  • deaf
  • print disabled

Noun

blind (plural blinds)

  1. A covering for a window to keep out light. The covering may be made of cloth or of narrow slats that can block light or allow it to pass.
  2. A destination sign mounted on a public transport vehicle displaying the route destination, number, name and/or via points, etc.
  3. Any device intended to conceal or hide.
  4. Something to mislead the eye or the understanding, or to conceal some covert deed or design; a subterfuge.
  5. (military) A blindage.
  6. A halting place.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  7. (rugby, colloquial) The blindside.
  8. (baseball, slang, 1800s) No score.
  9. (poker) A forced bet: the small blind or the big blind.
  10. (poker) A player who is forced to pay such a bet.

Synonyms

  • (destination sign): rollsign (mainly US)

Derived terms

  • big blind
  • blinders
  • small blind
  • Venetian blind
  • blind map

Translations

See also

  • curtain
  • jalousie

Verb

blind (third-person singular simple present blinds, present participle blinding, simple past and past participle blinded)

  1. (transitive) To make temporarily or permanently blind.
    • May 9, 1686 (date of preaching), Robert South, The Fatal Imposture and Force of Words (sermon)
      A blind guide is certainly a great mischief; but a guide that blinds those whom he should lead is [] a much greater.
  2. (slang, obsolete) To curse.
    • 1890, Rudyard Kipling, The Young British Soldier
      If you’re cast for fatigue by a sergeant unkind,
      Don’t grouse like a woman, nor crack on, nor blind;
      Be handy and civil, and then you will find
      That it’s beer for the young British soldier.
  3. To darken; to obscure to the eye or understanding; to conceal.
    • 1676, Edward Stillingfleet, A Defence of the Discourse Concerning the Idolatry Practised in the Church of Rome
      The state of the controversy between us he endeavored, with all his art, to blind and confound.
  4. To cover with a thin coating of sand and fine gravel, for example a road newly paved, in order that the joints between the stones may be filled.

Derived terms

  • blind with science
  • blinder
  • blinding
  • blindness

Translations

Adverb

blind (comparative more blind, superlative most blind)

  1. Without seeing; unseeingly.
  2. (colloquial) Absolutely, totally.
  3. (poker, three card brag) Without looking at the cards dealt.
  4. (cooking, especially in combination with ‘bake’) As a pastry case only, without any filling.

Translations

References


Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch blind, from Middle Dutch blint, from Old Dutch *blint, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blənt/

Adjective

blind (attributive blinde, comparative blinder, superlative blindste)

  1. blind (unable to see)

Derived terms

  • blindheid

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -end

Adjective

blind

  1. blind

Inflection

References

  • “blind” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blɪnt/
  • Hyphenation: blind
  • Rhymes: -ɪnt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch blint, from Old Dutch *blint, from Proto-West Germanic *blind, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

Adjective

blind (comparative blinder, superlative blindst)

  1. blind (unable to see)
Inflection
Derived terms
  • blinde vink
  • blinde vlek
  • blindganger
  • blindheid
  • verblinden
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: blind
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: blende
  • Negerhollands: blind, blin, blen

Etymology 2

From blinden.

Alternative forms

  • blinde f

Noun

blind n (plural blinden, diminutive blindje n)

  1. window shutter
Synonyms
  • luik

German

Etymology

From Middle High German and Old High German blint, from Proto-West Germanic *blind.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blɪnt/

Adjective

blind (comparative blinder, superlative am blindesten)

  1. blind
  2. (of a mirror or windowpane) cloudy
    • 1918, Elisabeth von Heyking, Die Orgelpfeifen, in: Zwei Erzählungen, Phillipp Reclam jun. Verlag, page 9:

Declension

Derived terms

  • blinder Passagier
  • farbenblind
  • nachtblind

See also

  • blenden

Further reading

  • “blind” in Duden online

German Low German

Etymology

From Middle Low German blint, from Old Saxon blind. Cognate to Dutch blind, German blind.

Adjective

blind (comparative blinner, superlative blinnst)

  1. blind

Declension


Icelandic

Adjective

blind

  1. inflection of blindur:
    1. feminine singular nominative strong positive degree
    2. neuter plural nominative strong positive degree
    3. neuter plural accusative strong positive degree

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • blynd, blend, blin

Etymology

From Old English blind, from Proto-West Germanic *blind.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bliːnd/, /blind/

Adjective

blind

  1. blind, sightless

Descendants

  • English: blind
  • Scots: blind, blynd
  • Yola: blin

References

  • “blī̆nd, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

Adjective

blind (neuter singular blindt, definite singular and plural blinde)

  1. blind

Derived terms

References

  • “blind” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz. Akin to English blind.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blɪnː/, /blɪnd/

Adjective

blind (masculine and feminine blind, neuter blindt, definite singular and plural blinde, comparative blindare, indefinite superlative blindast, definite superlative blindaste)

  1. blind

Derived terms

Verb

blind

  1. imperative of blinda

References

  • “blind” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *blind.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blind/

Adjective

blind

  1. blind
  2. (substantive) a blind person

Declension

Related terms

  • blindnes
  • blendan
  • blindlīċe

Descendants

  • Middle English: blind, blynd, blend, blin
    • English: blind
    • Scots: blind, blynd
    • Yola: blin

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *blind.

Adjective

blind

  1. blind

Declension



Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish blinder, from Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

Pronunciation

Adjective

blind (comparative blindare, superlative blindast)

  1. blind; unable or failing to see

Declension

Derived terms

  • blindgång
  • blindgångare
  • blindbock
  • blindstyre
  • färgblind


Translingual

Symbol

dim

  1. (mathematics) dimension

English

Etymology

From Middle English dim, dym, from Old English dim, dimm (dim, dark, gloomy; wretched, grievous, sad, unhappy), from Proto-Germanic *dimmaz (dark), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰem- (to whisk, smoke, blow; dust, haze, cloud; obscure). Compare Faroese dimmur, Icelandic dimmur (dark) and dimma (darkness).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: dĭm, IPA(key): /dɪm/
  • Rhymes: -ɪm

Adjective

dim (comparative dimmer, superlative dimmest)

  1. Not bright or colorful.
    The lighting was too dim for me to make out his facial features.
    • 1821, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Adonais
      that sustaining Love / Which, through the web of being blindly wove / By man and beast and earth and air and sea, / Burns bright or dim
  2. (colloquial) Not smart or intelligent.
    He may be a bit dim, but he’s not stupid.
  3. Indistinct, hazy or unclear.
    His vision grew dimmer as he aged.
  4. Disapproving, unfavorable: rarely used outside the phrase take a dim view of.
  5. (music) Clipping of diminished.

Translations

Noun

dim (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Dimness.

Verb

dim (third-person singular simple present dims, present participle dimming, simple past and past participle dimmed)

  1. (transitive) To make something less bright.
    He dimmed the lights and put on soft music.
  2. (intransitive) To become darker.
    The lights dimmed briefly when the air conditioning was turned on.
  3. To render dim, obscure, or dark; to make less bright or distinct
    • a king among his courtiers, [] who out to dim the lustre of all his attendants
    • 1791, William Cowper, The Odyssey of Homer
      Now set the sun, and twilight dimm’d the ways.
  4. To deprive of distinct vision; to hinder from seeing clearly, either by dazzling or clouding the eyes; to darken the senses or understanding of.
    • 1740, Christopher Pitt, The Aeneid
      Her starry eyes were dimm’d with streaming tears.

Derived terms

  • bedim
  • dimly
  • dimmer (noun)

Translations

Anagrams

  • DMI, IDM, IM’d, IMD, MDI, MID, Mid., mid, mid-

Indonesian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈdɪm]
  • Hyphenation: dim

Etymology 1

From Dutch duim.

Noun

dim (first-person possessive dimku, second-person possessive dimmu, third-person possessive dimnya)

  1. thumb
  2. inch
    Synonym: inci

Etymology 2

From English dimmer.

Noun

dim (first-person possessive dimku, second-person possessive dimmu, third-person possessive dimnya)

  1. high-beam headlamp on a road vehicle.

Further reading

  • “dim” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Latvian

Verb

dim

  1. 3rd person singular present indicative form of dimēt
  2. 3rd person plural present indicative form of dimēt
  3. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of dimēt
  4. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of dimēt

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse dimmr. Related to English dim and Icelandic dimmur.

Adjective

dim (neuter singular dimt, definite singular and plural dimme, comparative dimmere, indefinite superlative dimmest, definite superlative dimmeste)

  1. dim
  2. to have bad vision
    Han er dim på synet

    His vision is dim/bad/poor

References

  • “dim” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From the Old Norse adjective dimmr, from Proto-Germanic *dimmaz. The neuter noun is derived from the adjective. The automotive senses may be a Back-formation from of the verb dimme.

Adjective

dim (neuter singular dimt, definite singular and plural dimme, comparative dimmare, indefinite superlative dimmast, definite superlative dimmaste)

  1. gloomy
  2. dim
  3. having bad vision
    Han er dim på synet

    His vision is dim/bad/poor
Related terms
  • dimma, dimme (verb)

Noun 1

dim m (definite singular dimmen, indefinite plural dimmar, definite plural dimmane)

  1. (automotive, colloquial) a switching of one’s headlamps from high-beam to low-beam
  2. (automotive, colloquial) lever, button or other
  3. (dialectal) Clipping of dimme (twilight, half darkness).

Noun 2

dim n (definite singular dimmet, uncountable)

  1. (dialectal) dimmest, darkest part of the summer night
  2. (dialectal) twilight
    Synonym: skumring

Etymology 2

Noun

dim m (definite singular dimmen, indefinite plural dimmar, definite plural dimmane)

  1. (colloquial) Clipping of dimensjon.

References

  • “dim” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • mid-

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *dymъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós (smoke).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dîm/

Noun

dȉm m (Cyrillic spelling ди̏м)

  1. smoke

Declension

Derived terms

  • dimni signal

Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *dymъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós (smoke).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dím/

Noun

dȉm m inan

  1. smoke

Inflection

Further reading

  • dim”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Sumerian

Romanization

dim

  1. Romanization of ???? (dim)

Welsh

Etymology

From Middle Welsh dim. Cognate with the rare Old Irish dim (something, anything), which may be a Brythonic loanword. Further etymology uncertain. Matasović takes it from Proto-Celtic *dis-smi-, dissimilated from Proto-Indo-European *dus-smi- (literally bad one). Morris Jones hypothesizes the original meaning was share, portion and derives it from Proto-Celtic *dīsman, from Proto-Indo-European *deh₂y- (to share).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪm/

Adjective

dim

  1. any
  2. no, not, none

Noun

dim m (uncountable)

  1. anything
  2. nothing, none, nil, zero

Particle

dim

  1. not

Usage notes

As a verbal particle, almost always appears mutated as ddim.

Mutation

Further reading

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), chapter DIM, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

References


Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial