blind vs unreasoning what difference

what is difference between blind and unreasoning

English

Alternative forms

  • (archaic) blinde

Etymology

From Middle English blind, from Old English blind, from Proto-West Germanic *blind, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blaɪnd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd

Adjective

blind (comparative blinder, superlative blindest)

  1. (not comparable, of a person or animal) Unable to see, due to physiological or neurological factors.
    Synonym: sightless
    Antonyms: seeing, sighted
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island,
      He was plainly blind, for he tapped before him with a stick, and wore a great green shade over his eyes and nose…
  2. (not comparable, of an eye) Unable to be used to see, due to physiological or neurological factors.
  3. (comparable) Failing to see, acknowledge, perceive.
  4. (not comparable) Of a place, having little or no visibility.
  5. (not comparable) Closed at one end; having a dead end; exitless.
  6. (not comparable) Having no openings for light or passage; both dark and exitless.
  7. (in certain phrases, chiefly in the negative) Smallest or slightest.
  8. (not comparable) Without any prior knowledge.
  9. (not comparable) Unconditional; without regard to evidence, logic, reality, accidental mistakes, extenuating circumstances, etc.
    • 1787–1788, John Jay, The Federalist Papers
      This plan is recommended neither to blind approbation nor to blind reprobation.
  10. (sciences) Using blinded study design, wherein information is purposely limited to prevent bias.
  11. Unintelligible or illegible.
  12. (horticulture) Abortive; failing to produce flowers or fruit.
  13. (LGBT, slang) Uncircumcised

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • invisible (unable to be seen)
  • anosmic
  • deaf
  • print disabled

Noun

blind (plural blinds)

  1. A covering for a window to keep out light. The covering may be made of cloth or of narrow slats that can block light or allow it to pass.
  2. A destination sign mounted on a public transport vehicle displaying the route destination, number, name and/or via points, etc.
  3. Any device intended to conceal or hide.
  4. Something to mislead the eye or the understanding, or to conceal some covert deed or design; a subterfuge.
  5. (military) A blindage.
  6. A halting place.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  7. (rugby, colloquial) The blindside.
  8. (baseball, slang, 1800s) No score.
  9. (poker) A forced bet: the small blind or the big blind.
  10. (poker) A player who is forced to pay such a bet.

Synonyms

  • (destination sign): rollsign (mainly US)

Derived terms

  • big blind
  • blinders
  • small blind
  • Venetian blind
  • blind map

Translations

See also

  • curtain
  • jalousie

Verb

blind (third-person singular simple present blinds, present participle blinding, simple past and past participle blinded)

  1. (transitive) To make temporarily or permanently blind.
    • May 9, 1686 (date of preaching), Robert South, The Fatal Imposture and Force of Words (sermon)
      A blind guide is certainly a great mischief; but a guide that blinds those whom he should lead is [] a much greater.
  2. (slang, obsolete) To curse.
    • 1890, Rudyard Kipling, The Young British Soldier
      If you’re cast for fatigue by a sergeant unkind,
      Don’t grouse like a woman, nor crack on, nor blind;
      Be handy and civil, and then you will find
      That it’s beer for the young British soldier.
  3. To darken; to obscure to the eye or understanding; to conceal.
    • 1676, Edward Stillingfleet, A Defence of the Discourse Concerning the Idolatry Practised in the Church of Rome
      The state of the controversy between us he endeavored, with all his art, to blind and confound.
  4. To cover with a thin coating of sand and fine gravel, for example a road newly paved, in order that the joints between the stones may be filled.

Derived terms

  • blind with science
  • blinder
  • blinding
  • blindness

Translations

Adverb

blind (comparative more blind, superlative most blind)

  1. Without seeing; unseeingly.
  2. (colloquial) Absolutely, totally.
  3. (poker, three card brag) Without looking at the cards dealt.
  4. (cooking, especially in combination with ‘bake’) As a pastry case only, without any filling.

Translations

References


Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch blind, from Middle Dutch blint, from Old Dutch *blint, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blənt/

Adjective

blind (attributive blinde, comparative blinder, superlative blindste)

  1. blind (unable to see)

Derived terms

  • blindheid

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -end

Adjective

blind

  1. blind

Inflection

References

  • “blind” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blɪnt/
  • Hyphenation: blind
  • Rhymes: -ɪnt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch blint, from Old Dutch *blint, from Proto-West Germanic *blind, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

Adjective

blind (comparative blinder, superlative blindst)

  1. blind (unable to see)
Inflection
Derived terms
  • blinde vink
  • blinde vlek
  • blindganger
  • blindheid
  • verblinden
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: blind
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: blende
  • Negerhollands: blind, blin, blen

Etymology 2

From blinden.

Alternative forms

  • blinde f

Noun

blind n (plural blinden, diminutive blindje n)

  1. window shutter
Synonyms
  • luik

German

Etymology

From Middle High German and Old High German blint, from Proto-West Germanic *blind.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blɪnt/

Adjective

blind (comparative blinder, superlative am blindesten)

  1. blind
  2. (of a mirror or windowpane) cloudy
    • 1918, Elisabeth von Heyking, Die Orgelpfeifen, in: Zwei Erzählungen, Phillipp Reclam jun. Verlag, page 9:

Declension

Derived terms

  • blinder Passagier
  • farbenblind
  • nachtblind

See also

  • blenden

Further reading

  • “blind” in Duden online

German Low German

Etymology

From Middle Low German blint, from Old Saxon blind. Cognate to Dutch blind, German blind.

Adjective

blind (comparative blinner, superlative blinnst)

  1. blind

Declension


Icelandic

Adjective

blind

  1. inflection of blindur:
    1. feminine singular nominative strong positive degree
    2. neuter plural nominative strong positive degree
    3. neuter plural accusative strong positive degree

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • blynd, blend, blin

Etymology

From Old English blind, from Proto-West Germanic *blind.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bliːnd/, /blind/

Adjective

blind

  1. blind, sightless

Descendants

  • English: blind
  • Scots: blind, blynd
  • Yola: blin

References

  • “blī̆nd, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

Adjective

blind (neuter singular blindt, definite singular and plural blinde)

  1. blind

Derived terms

References

  • “blind” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz. Akin to English blind.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blɪnː/, /blɪnd/

Adjective

blind (masculine and feminine blind, neuter blindt, definite singular and plural blinde, comparative blindare, indefinite superlative blindast, definite superlative blindaste)

  1. blind

Derived terms

Verb

blind

  1. imperative of blinda

References

  • “blind” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *blind.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blind/

Adjective

blind

  1. blind
  2. (substantive) a blind person

Declension

Related terms

  • blindnes
  • blendan
  • blindlīċe

Descendants

  • Middle English: blind, blynd, blend, blin
    • English: blind
    • Scots: blind, blynd
    • Yola: blin

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *blind.

Adjective

blind

  1. blind

Declension



Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish blinder, from Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

Pronunciation

Adjective

blind (comparative blindare, superlative blindast)

  1. blind; unable or failing to see

Declension

Derived terms

  • blindgång
  • blindgångare
  • blindbock
  • blindstyre
  • färgblind


English

Etymology

un- +‎ reasoning

Adjective

unreasoning (comparative more unreasoning, superlative most unreasoning)

  1. Behaving without reason.

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