blinder vs blinker what difference

what is difference between blinder and blinker

English

Etymology

From blind +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈblaɪndə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈblaɪndɚ/

Adjective

blinder

  1. comparative form of blind: more blind

Noun

blinder (plural blinders)

  1. Something that blinds.
    • 1924, Herman Melville, Billy Budd, London: Constable & Co., Chapter 15, [1]
      As it was, innocence was his blinder.
  2. A bag or cloth put over the head of a difficult horse while it is being handled or mounted.
  3. A screen attached to a horse’s bridle preventing it from being able to see things to its side.
    • 1969, Kenzaburō Ōe, A Personal Matter, translated by John Nathan, New York: Grove Press, Chapter 5, p. 84,
      From both sides of his head a blackness swiftly grew like blinders on a horse and darkly narrowed his field of vision.
    • 1978 Edward Said, Orientalism, New York: Vinatage, 2003, Chapter 3, Part I, p. 207,
      Orientalism itself, furthermore, was an exclusively male province; like so many professional guilds during the modern period, it viewed itself and its subject matter with sexist blinders.
  4. (Britain, slang) An exceptional performance.
    He played a blinder this afternoon on the cricket ground.
    • 1992, Glyn Maxwell, “Out of the Rain” in Boys at Twilight: Poems 1990 to 1995, New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2000, p. 91,
      And we asked the blue winger, who in our game / had played what they call a blinder, to help out
  5. (slang) A bout of heavy drinking, a bender.
    • 1985, John Maxton, Hansard, 2 May, 1985, [2]
      If a man goes out on a blinder, he might be charged with being drunk and incapable and therefore have a criminal record, although he is an honourable man.
  6. (theater) A bright light used to blind the audience temporarily during a scene change.
    • 1992, The Lighting Journal (page 9)
      When the ‘blinders’ are switched off, and the audience’s eyes given time to re-adjust, the new scene is in place []

Synonyms

  • (horse’s blindfold): blinker, winker
  • (exceptional performance): cracker

Translations

Verb

blinder (third-person singular simple present blinders, present participle blindering, simple past and past participle blindered)

  1. (transitive) To fit (a horse) with blinders.
  2. (transitive, figuratively, by extension) To obstruct the vision of.
    • 1958, Sylvia Plath, “Above the Oxbow” in The Collected Poems, New York: Harper & Row, p. 88,
      [] We climb in hopes / Of such seeing up the leaf-shuttered escarpments, / Blindered by green, under a green-grained sky
    • 1986, Tessa Albert Warschaw, Rich is Better: How Women Can Bridge the Gap Between Wanting and Having It All — Financially, Emotionally, Professionally, Penguin, p. 248,
      They think they’re being focussed when they’re really just blindering their eyes, as a farmer would a plough horse, to ways of getting to their goal faster.

Anagrams

  • Brindle, brindle

French

Etymology

From blinde +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /blɛ̃.de/

Verb

blinder

  1. to armor; to reinforce

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • blindage

Descendants

  • Italian: blindare
  • Portuguese: blindar
  • Spanish: blindar

Further reading

  • “blinder” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈblɪndɐ/

Adjective

blinder

  1. comparative degree of blind

Adjective

blinder

  1. inflection of blind:
    1. strong/mixed nominative masculine singular
    2. strong genitive/dative feminine singular
    3. strong genitive plural

Old Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

Adjective

blinder

  1. blind
  2. invisible, obscure

Declension

Descendants

  • Swedish: blind

Welsh

Etymology

From blin +‎ -der.

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales, standard, colloquial) IPA(key): /ˈblɪndɛr/
    • (North Wales, colloquial) IPA(key): /ˈblɪndar/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /ˈblɪndɛr/

Noun

blinder m (plural blinderau)

  1. (uncountable) tiredness, weariness, fatigue
  2. (countable) trouble, affliction

Derived terms

  • blinderog (weary, tired)
  • blinderus (wearisome, tiring; troublesome, troubling)

Mutation


English

Etymology

blink +‎ -er

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈblɪŋkə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋkə(r)

Noun

blinker (plural blinkers)

  1. (informal, US, automotive) Anything that blinks, such as the turn signal of an automobile.
  2. Eye shields attached to a hood for horses, to prevent them from seeing backwards and partially sideways.
  3. Whatever obstructs sight or discernment.
    • 1732, Matthew Green, Grotto
      This floor let not the vulgar tread,
      Who worship only what they dread:
      Nor bigots who but one way see,
      Through blinkers of authority
  4. (rare) The eyelid.
  5. (slang) A black eye.
    • 2011, Mari Christie, Concrete Loyalties (page 419)
      The next morning, Jimmy came home with a fat lip and a black eye. Flory rushed over to tend to him. “Ain’t nothin’. Just a blinker… had a fight with a guy. []
  6. (cellular automata) In Conway’s Game of Life, an arrangement of three cells in a row that switches between horizontal and vertical orientations in each generation.

Synonyms

  • (turn signal of an automobile): directional, directional signal, indicator, trafficator, turn indicator, turn signal
  • (eye shield for a horse): blinder, winker

Translations

Verb

blinker (third-person singular simple present blinkers, present participle blinkering, simple past and past participle blinkered)

  1. (transitive) To put blinkers on.
    The farmer stopped to blinker his horse before riding into an area of heavy traffic.

See also

  • blinkers

Danish

Verb

blinker

  1. present of blinke

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

blinker m

  1. indefinite plural of blink

Verb

blinker

  1. present of blinke

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