blip vs pip what difference

what is difference between blip and pip

English

Etymology

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /blɪp/

Noun

blip (plural blips)

  1. (electronics) A small dot registered on electronic equipment, such as a radar or oscilloscope screen.
  2. A short sound of a single pitch, usually electronically generated.
  3. (by extension) A brief and usually minor aberration or deviation from what is expected or normal.
  4. (Internet, historical) An individual message or document in the Google Wave software framework.
    • 2010, Gina Trapani, Adam Pash, The Complete Guide to Google Wave (page 51)
      When a participant has full access permissions to a wave, he or she can change the contents of all blips and reply within or after blips.
    • 2010, Andres Ferrate, Google Wave: Up and Running (page 87)
      Although the wiki-like editing capabilities of Google Wave represent a valuable feature, there is some debate about whether participants should edit other participants’ blips or their own blips.

Translations

Verb

blip (third-person singular simple present blips, present participle blipping, simple past and past participle blipped)

  1. (intransitive, informal) To change state abruptly, such as between off and on or dark and light, sometimes implying motion.
  2. (transitive) Synonym of bleep (to replace offending words in a broadcast recording with a tone)
    • 2003, Harry Castleman, Walter J. Podrazik, Watching TV: Six Decades of American Television (page 155)
      [] even walking off his own show once after an NBC censor had arbitrarily blipped a mildly risque joke from the day’s tape.

Derived terms

  • blip out


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: pĭp, IPA(key): /pɪp/
  • Rhymes: -ɪp

Etymology 1

From Middle English pippe, from Middle Dutch pip, from post-classical Latin pipita, from Latin pītuīta (mucus, phlegm, head cold).

Noun

pip (plural pips)

  1. Any of various respiratory diseases in birds, especially infectious coryza. [from the 15th c.]
  2. (humorous, dated) Of humans, a disease, malaise or depression.
    • 1912, D. H. Lawrence, letter to Edward Garnett
      I’ve got the pip horribly at present.
Derived terms
  • like a chicken with the pip
Translations

Etymology 2

Apparently representing a shortened form of pippin, from Middle English pipin, from Old French pepin (a seed) (French pépin).

Noun

pip (plural pips)

  1. (obsolete) A pippin, seed of any kind.
    1. (Britain) A seed inside certain fleshy fruits (compare stone/pit), such as a peach, orange, or apple.
  2. (US, colloquial) Something or someone excellent, of high quality.
    • 2006, Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day, Vintage 2007, p. 612:
      She sure is a pip, that one. You need company?
  3. (Britain, dated, WW I, signalese) P in RAF phonetic alphabet.
Derived terms
  • pip emma
  • until the pips squeak
Translations

Etymology 3

Origin uncertain, perhaps related to Etymology 2, above.

Noun

pip (plural pips)

  1. One of the spots or symbols on a playing card, domino, die, etc.
  2. (military, public service) One of the stylised version of the Bath star worn on the shoulder of a uniform to denote rank, e.g. of a soldier or a fireman.
  3. A spot; a speck.
  4. A spot of light or an inverted V indicative of a return of radar waves reflected from an object; a blip.
  5. A piece of rhizome with a dormant shoot of the lily of the valley plant, used for propagation
Synonyms
  • (symbol on playing card etc): spot
Translations

Verb

pip (third-person singular simple present pips, present participle pipping, simple past and past participle pipped)

  1. To get the better of; to defeat by a narrow margin
  2. To hit with a gunshot

Etymology 4

Imitative.

Verb

pip (third-person singular simple present pips, present participle pipping, simple past and past participle pipped)

  1. To peep, to chirp
  2. (avian biology) To make the initial hole during the process of hatching from an egg

Etymology 5

Imitative.

Noun

pip (plural pips)

  1. One of a series of very short, electronically produced tones, used, for example, to count down the final few seconds before a given time or to indicate that a caller using a payphone needs to make further payment if he is to continue his call.
    • 1982 John Banville, The Newton Letter
      I could clearly hear the frequent cataclysms of the upstairs lavatory, and my day began with the pips for the morning news in Charlotte Lawless’s kitchen.
Synonyms
  • (electronic sound, counting down seconds): stroke
Translations

Etymology 6

Abbreviation of percentage in point.

Noun

pip (plural pips)

  1. (finance, currency trading) The smallest price increment between two currencies in foreign exchange (forex) trading.

Related terms

  • pip to the post
  • pip at the post
  • pipsqueak
  • give the pip to, give someone the pip

Anagrams

  • IPP, PPI

Albanian

Etymology 1

A descriptive term, similar to German piepen and Latin pipīre.

Verb

pip (first-person singular past tense pipa, participle pipur)

  1. to peep, to chirp

Etymology 2

From Romance *pīpa, also present in Old French pipe, Italian pipa etc.

Noun

pip f (indefinite plural pipa, definite singular pipa, definite plural pipat)

  1. sprout, shoot
  2. pipe, tube

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse *pípa, from Proto-Germanic *pīpaną.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pip/, [pʰib̥]

Noun

pip n (singular definite pippet, plural indefinite pip)

  1. chirp, peep, tweet
  2. bleep

Inflection

Noun

pip n

  1. (dated) nonsense, gibberish, madness
    • 2015, William Heinesen, Tårnet ved verdens ende: En poetisk mosaik-roman om den yngste ungdom, Gyldendal A/S →ISBN
      Sådan noget pip!
    • 1975, Manfred Spliedt, Sådan en dum knægt
      Sikke noget pip.
    • 1975, Aksel Sandemose, Minner fra andre dager
      Jeg var forarget over saadan noget Pip

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch pip (disease of poultry, also of people), from post-classical Latin pipita, from Latin pītuīta (slime, head cold).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɪp/
  • Hyphenation: pip
  • Rhymes: -ɪp

Noun

pip m (uncountable)

  1. Pip (any of various respiratory diseases in birds, especially infectious coryza).
  2. (humorous or colloquial) Of humans, a disease (particularly the common cold or the flu), malaise or depression.

Derived terms

  • pips
  • de pip krijgen

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Onomatopoeic.

Interjection

pip

  1. peep
  2. squeak

Noun

pip n (definite singular pipet, indefinite plural pip, definite plural pipa)

  1. peeping sound
  2. act of producing a single peeping sound

Etymology 2

Specialized use of Etymology 1.

Noun

pip m (definite singular pipen, indefinite plural pipar, definite plural pipane)

  1. used in the expression ta pipen frå.
    1. resolve

Etymology 3

Noun

pip m (definite singular pipen, indefinite plural pipar, definite plural pipane)

  1. peepee, penis

References

  • “pip” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse *pípa, from Proto-Germanic *pīpaną.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -iːp

Noun

pip n

  1. squeak, beep

Declension

Verb

pip

  1. imperative of pipa.

Volapük

Etymology

Borrowed from French pipe and English pipe.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pip/

Noun

pip (nominative plural pips)

  1. pipe (for smoking)

Declension

Related terms

  • smokön
  • tabak

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