blister vs bulla what difference

what is difference between blister and bulla

English

Etymology

From Middle English blister, from Old French blestre, from a Germanic source. Compare Middle Dutch blyster (swelling), Old Norse blastr (a blowing).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈblɪstɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪstə(r)

Noun

blister (plural blisters)

  1. A small bubble between the layers of the skin that contains watery or bloody fluid and is caused by friction and pressure, burning, freezing, chemical irritation, disease or infection.
    • 1967, Donald Howard Grainger, Don’t Die in the Bundu
      Inspect them for rub marks and blisters; tape or bandage rub marks; clean the skin around a blister, use a sterilised needle to puncture it at its outer edge and press out the fluid, then bandage.
  2. A swelling on a plant.
  3. (medicine) Something applied to the skin to raise a blister; a vesicatory or other applied medicine.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dunglison to this entry?)
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, I.168:
      ‘T is written in the Hebrew Chronicle, / How the physicians, leaving pill and potion, / Prescribed, by way of blister, a young belle, / When old King David’s blood grew dull in motion, / And that the medicine answered very well []
  4. A bubble, as on a painted surface.
  5. (roofing) An enclosed pocket of air, which may be mixed with water or solvent vapor, trapped between impermeable layers of felt or between the membrane and substrate.
  6. A type of pre-formed packaging made from plastic that contains cavities.
  7. a cause of annoyance
    • 1923 Pelham Grenville Wodehouse The Inimitable Jeeves page 39
      I couldn’t help thinking how dashed happy I could have contrived to be in this place if only Aunt Agatha and the other blisters had been elsewhere.
    • 1933 Collier’s Illustrated Weekly, Volume 91 page 14
      I will say, however, that we fanned her well — her and her old blister of a mother and a bewhisk- ered old goat named Boris.
    • 2013 P.G. Wodehouse, Blandings: TV Tie-In page 126
      ‘We mustn’t laugh about it, my boy. It’s no joking matter. It’s very wrong to shoot Mr Baxter.’
      ‘But he’s a blister.’
      ‘He is a blister,’ agreed Lord Emsworth, always fairminded. ‘Nevertheless. . . . Remember, he is your tutor.’
    • 2017 Joe Archibald, The Willie Klump MEGAPACK® page 302
      Willie suddenly realized the heat really wasn’t off the criminal persons, and he sprang into action. The blonde blister also recovered surprisingly fast and threw the big wordy tome at the Klump coco .

Synonyms

  • bleb
  • blain

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

blister (third-person singular simple present blisters, present participle blistering, simple past and past participle blistered)

  1. (transitive) To raise blisters on.
  2. (intransitive) To have a blister form.
  3. (transitive) To criticise severely.
  4. (intransitive) To break out in blisters.

Synonyms

  • vesicate

Translations

Anagrams

  • Bitlers, Bristle, Liberts, bristle, reblits, riblets

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English blister (blister; blister pack).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈblɪs.tər/
  • Hyphenation: blis‧ter

Noun

blister m (plural blisters, diminutive blistertje n)

  1. blister pack
    Synonyms: doordrukstrip, blisterpak, blisterverpakking

French

Noun

blister m (plural blisters)

  1. blister pack

Polish

Etymology

From English blister.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈblʲis.tɛr/

Noun

blister m inan

  1. blister pack

Declension

Further reading

  • blister in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • blister in Polish dictionaries at PWN


English

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin bulla (bubble). Doublet of bull.

Noun

bulla (plural bullae)

  1. (medicine) A blister, vesicle, or other thin-walled cavity or lesion.
  2. (archaeology) A clay envelope or hollow ball, typically with seal impressions or writing on its outside indicating its contents.
  3. (historical) In ancient Rome, a kind of amulet or boss.
  4. Later, a handwritten document from the papal chancellery.
  5. The tympanic part of a temporal bone (having a bubble-like appearance)

See also

  • bullous

Etymology 2

Noun

bulla (countable and uncountable, plural bullas)

  1. A rich Jamaican cake made with molasses and spiced with ginger and nutmeg.

Further reading

  • bulla on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Darkinjung

Numeral

bulla

  1. two

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin bulla.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbulːɑ/, [ˈbulːɑ]
  • Rhymes: -ulːɑ
  • Syllabification: bul‧la

Noun

bulla

  1. bull (papal bull)

Declension


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /by.la/

Verb

bulla

  1. third-person singular past historic of buller

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpʏtla/
  • Rhymes: -ʏtla

Noun

bulla f (genitive singular bullu, nominative plural bullur)

  1. a piston
  2. a bully

Declension

Synonyms

  • (piston): stimpill
  • (bully): svoli

Derived terms

Verb

bulla (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative bullaði, supine bullað)

  1. (intransitive) to talk nonsense
  2. (intransitive) to boil, to bubble up

Conjugation

Synonyms

  • (talk nonsense): rugla, þvæla, þvaðra
  • (boil): sjóða

Derived terms

  • bullandi

Related terms

  • bull

Irish

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

bulla m (genitive singular bulla, nominative plural bullaí)

  1. (nautical) buoy
  2. (medicine) bulla
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Irish bulla, borrowed from Latin bulla.

Noun

bulla m (genitive singular bulla, nominative plural bullaí)

  1. (Christianity) bull

Etymology 3

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

bulla m (genitive singular bulla, nominative plural bullaí)

  1. (finance) bull

Etymology 4

Noun

bulla m (genitive singular bulla, nominative plural bullaí)

  1. Alternative form of bolla (bowl)

Declension

Mutation

Further reading

  • “bulla” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 bulla”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “bulla” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “bulla” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Latin

Etymology

From Gaulish [Term?], from Proto-Indo-European *bew- (swelling), same source as Middle Dutch puyl (bag) and Lithuanian bule (buttocks), or from *bʰel- (to blow, inflate, swell).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈbul.la/, [ˈbʊlːʲä]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈbul.la/, [ˈbulːɑ]

Noun

bulla f (genitive bullae); first declension

  1. a bubble
  2. a swollen or bubble-shaped object, particularly:
    1. a knob, boss, or stud, as on doors, shields, etc.
    2. (historical) a bulla: a protective (usually golden) amulet worn by upper-class Roman children
    3. (Medieval Latin, historical) a round metallic seal certifying official medieval documents, particularly the golden imperial seal and the leaden papal one.
  3. (Medieval Latin) a papal bull or other official document sealed with a bulla

Declension

First-declension noun.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Eastern Romance
    • Romanian: bulă
  • Italo-Dalmatian
    • Sicilian: buḍḍa
  • Rhaeto-Romance
    • Friulian: bole
  • Venetian: bóła
  • West Iberian
    • Old Portuguese: [Term?]
      • Galician: bola
      • Portuguese: bolha
    • Old Spanish: [Term?]
      • Spanish: bula
  • Catalan: butlla
  • English: bull, bulla
  • Galician: bula
  • Old Irish: bulla
    • Irish: bulla
  • Polish: bulla
  • Portuguese: bula
  • Old French: bulle, boille, boule, boulle, burle
    • Middle French: bulle
      • French: bulle
    • Middle English: bulle
      • English: bull
      • Scots: bull, bul
  • Vulgar Latin: *bolla (merger with Frankish *bolla; see there for more descendants)

References

  • bulla in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • bulla in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • bulla in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • bulla in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • bulla in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • bulla in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Phuthi

Verb

-búĺla

  1. to be circumcised

Inflection

This verb needs an inflection-table template.


Polish

Etymology

From Latin bulla.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbul.la/

Noun

bulla f

  1. bull, papal bull; a document from the papal chancellery

Usage notes

Usually found in the noun phrase bulla papieska.

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

From bullir, from Latin bullīre, present active infinitive of bulliō (to bubble, boil), from bulla (bubble).

Noun

bulla f (plural bullas)

  1. rowdiness, racket, ruckus
  2. (Andalusia) urgence

Derived terms

  • embullar

Descendants

  • Portuguese: bulha

Verb

bulla

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of bullir.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of bullir.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of bullir.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of bullir.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial