blister vs whip what difference

what is difference between blister and whip

English

Etymology

From Middle English blister, from Old French blestre, from a Germanic source. Compare Middle Dutch blyster (swelling), Old Norse blastr (a blowing).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈblɪstɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪstə(r)

Noun

blister (plural blisters)

  1. A small bubble between the layers of the skin that contains watery or bloody fluid and is caused by friction and pressure, burning, freezing, chemical irritation, disease or infection.
    • 1967, Donald Howard Grainger, Don’t Die in the Bundu
      Inspect them for rub marks and blisters; tape or bandage rub marks; clean the skin around a blister, use a sterilised needle to puncture it at its outer edge and press out the fluid, then bandage.
  2. A swelling on a plant.
  3. (medicine) Something applied to the skin to raise a blister; a vesicatory or other applied medicine.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dunglison to this entry?)
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, I.168:
      ‘T is written in the Hebrew Chronicle, / How the physicians, leaving pill and potion, / Prescribed, by way of blister, a young belle, / When old King David’s blood grew dull in motion, / And that the medicine answered very well []
  4. A bubble, as on a painted surface.
  5. (roofing) An enclosed pocket of air, which may be mixed with water or solvent vapor, trapped between impermeable layers of felt or between the membrane and substrate.
  6. A type of pre-formed packaging made from plastic that contains cavities.
  7. a cause of annoyance
    • 1923 Pelham Grenville Wodehouse The Inimitable Jeeves page 39
      I couldn’t help thinking how dashed happy I could have contrived to be in this place if only Aunt Agatha and the other blisters had been elsewhere.
    • 1933 Collier’s Illustrated Weekly, Volume 91 page 14
      I will say, however, that we fanned her well — her and her old blister of a mother and a bewhisk- ered old goat named Boris.
    • 2013 P.G. Wodehouse, Blandings: TV Tie-In page 126
      ‘We mustn’t laugh about it, my boy. It’s no joking matter. It’s very wrong to shoot Mr Baxter.’
      ‘But he’s a blister.’
      ‘He is a blister,’ agreed Lord Emsworth, always fairminded. ‘Nevertheless. . . . Remember, he is your tutor.’
    • 2017 Joe Archibald, The Willie Klump MEGAPACK® page 302
      Willie suddenly realized the heat really wasn’t off the criminal persons, and he sprang into action. The blonde blister also recovered surprisingly fast and threw the big wordy tome at the Klump coco .

Synonyms

  • bleb
  • blain

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

blister (third-person singular simple present blisters, present participle blistering, simple past and past participle blistered)

  1. (transitive) To raise blisters on.
  2. (intransitive) To have a blister form.
  3. (transitive) To criticise severely.
  4. (intransitive) To break out in blisters.

Synonyms

  • vesicate

Translations

Anagrams

  • Bitlers, Bristle, Liberts, bristle, reblits, riblets

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English blister (blister; blister pack).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈblɪs.tər/
  • Hyphenation: blis‧ter

Noun

blister m (plural blisters, diminutive blistertje n)

  1. blister pack
    Synonyms: doordrukstrip, blisterpak, blisterverpakking

French

Noun

blister m (plural blisters)

  1. blister pack

Polish

Etymology

From English blister.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈblʲis.tɛr/

Noun

blister m inan

  1. blister pack

Declension

Further reading

  • blister in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • blister in Polish dictionaries at PWN


English

Etymology

From Middle English whippen, wippen (to flap violently), from Middle Dutch wippen (to swing, leap, dance, oscillate) and Middle Low German wippen (to move quickly), from Proto-Germanic *wipjaną (to move back and forth). Some similarity to Sanskrit root वेप् (vep, shake, flourish), Latin vibrō (I shake). (See Swedish vippa and Danish vippe (to shake)).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: wĭp, IPA(key): /wɪp/
  • Rhymes: -ɪp
  • enPR: hwĭp, IPA(key): /ʍɪp/

Noun

whip (plural whips)

  1. A lash; a pliant, flexible instrument, such as a rod (commonly of cane or rattan) or a plaited or braided rope or thong (commonly of leather) used to create a sharp “crack” sound for directing or herding animals.
    1. The same instrument used to strike a person or animal for corporal punishment or torture.
  2. A blow administered with a whip.
    • 1832, The Atheneum (volume 31, page 493)
      I had hardly said the word, when Kit jumped into the saddle, and gave his horse a whip and a spur — and off it cantered, as if it were in as great a hurry to be married as Kit himself.
  3. (hunting) A whipper-in.
    • 1928, Siegfried Sassoon, Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man, Penguin 2013, p. 27:
      From the far side of the wood came the long shrill screech [] which signifies that one of the whips has viewed the fox quitting the covert.
  4. (politics) A member of a political party who is in charge of enforcing the party’s policies in votes.
  5. (UK politics, with definite article) A document distributed weekly to MPs by party whips informing them of upcoming votes in parliament.
  6. Whipped cream.
  7. (nautical) A purchase in which one block is used to gain a 2:1 mechanical advantage.
  8. (African-American Vernacular) A mode of personal motorized transportation; an automobile, all makes and models including motorcycles, excluding public transportation.
    • 2017, Stormzy, Return of the Rucksack
      Big whip I’m underground parking
  9. (roller derby) A move in which one player transfers momentum to another.
  10. A whipping motion; a thrashing about.
  11. The quality of being whiplike or flexible; suppleness, as of the shaft of a golf club.
  12. Any of various pieces that operate with a quick vibratory motion
    1. A spring in certain electrical devices for making a circuit
    2. (music) A wippen, a rocking component in certain piano actions.
  13. (historical) A coach driver; a coachman.

Synonyms

  • (last for directing animals): crop (especially for horses), dressage whip (especially for horses), driving whip (especially for horses), jumping bat (especially for horses), flail, knout, lash, quirt, scourge, sjambok (South African), thong
  • (lash for corporal punishment): cat (nautical), flail, knout, lash, quirt, scourge, sjambok (South African), thong
  • (political party enforcer): party whip

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

  • whip snake

Translations

Verb

whip (third-person singular simple present whips, present participle whipping, simple past and past participle whipped)

  1. (transitive) To hit with a whip.
  2. (transitive, by extension) To hit with any flexible object.
  3. (transitive, slang) To defeat, as in a contest or game.
  4. (transitive) To mix in a rapid aerating fashion, especially food.
  5. (transitive) To urge into action or obedience.
  6. (transitive, politics) To enforce a member voting in accordance with party policy.
  7. (transitive, nautical) To bind the end of a rope with twine or other small stuff to prevent its unlaying: fraying or unravelling.
    • 1677-1683, Joseph Moxon, Mechanick exercises
      Its string [] is firmly whipt about with small Gut
  8. (transitive, nautical) To hoist or purchase by means of a whip.
  9. To sew lightly; specifically, to form (a fabric) into gathers by loosely overcasting the rolled edge and drawing up the thread.
    • In half-whipped muslin needles useless lie.
  10. (transitive) To throw or kick an object at a high velocity.
  11. (transitive, intransitive) To fish a body of water especially by making repeated casts.
    • 1858, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Adirondac
      whipping its rough surface for a trout
  12. (intransitive) To snap back and forth like a whip.
  13. (intransitive) To move very fast.
    • 1886, Robert Louis Stevenson, Strange Case Of Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde
      He looked up when I came in, gave a kind of cry, and whipped upstairs into the cabinet. It was but for one minute that I saw him, but the hair stood upon my head like quills.
  14. (transitive) To move (something) very fast; often with up, out, etc.
    • 1742, Horace Walpole, letter to Sir Horace Mann
      He whips out his pocketbook every moment, and writes descriptions of everything he sees.
  15. (transitive, roller derby) To transfer momentum from one skater to another.
  16. (figuratively) To lash with sarcasm, abuse, etc.
  17. To thrash; to beat out, as grain, by striking.

Synonyms

  • (to hit with a whip): Thesaurus:whip
  • (to move very fast): flail
  • thrash
  • thresh

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • ghost ride the whip

References

  • Samuel Johnson, John Walker, Robert S. Jameson: 1828. A dictionary of the English language 2nd edition. Publisher: William Pickering, 1828. 831 pages. Page 818. Google Public Domain Books : [2]

Further reading

  • whip in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • whip at OneLook Dictionary Search

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial