block vs stuff what difference

what is difference between block and stuff

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /blɒk/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /blɑk/
  • Rhymes: -ɒk
  • Homophone: bloc

Etymology 1

From Middle English blok (log, stump, solid piece), from Old French bloc (log, block), from Middle Dutch blok (treetrunk), from Old Dutch *blok (log), from Proto-West Germanic *blokk, from Proto-Germanic *blukką (beam, log), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰelǵ- (thick plank, beam, pile, prop). Cognate with Old Frisian blok, Old Saxon blok, Old High German bloh, bloc (block), Old English bolca (gangway of a ship, plank), Old Norse bǫlkr (divider, partition). More at balk. See also bloc.

Noun

block (plural blocks)

  1. A substantial, often approximately cuboid, piece of any substance.
    a block of ice, a block of stone
    1. A chopping block: a cuboid base for cutting or beheading.
      Anne Boleyn placed her head on the block and awaited her execution.
      • You young porkers who are sitting in front of me, every one of you will scream your lives out at the block within a year.
    2. A wig block: a simplified head model upon which wigs are worn.
      • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 13
        Next morning, Monday, after disposing of the embalmed head to a barber, for a block, I settled my own and comrade’s bill; using, however, my comrade’s money.
    3. A mould on which hats, bonnets, etc., are shaped.
    4. (printing, dated) A piece of hard wood on which a stereotype or electrotype plate is mounted.
    5. A case or frame housing one or more sheaves (pulleys), used with ropes to increase or redirect force, for example as part of lifting gear or a sailing ship’s rigging. See also block and tackle.
    6. A section of split logs used as fuel.
      • 1833, The Gospel Anchor (volume 2, page 371)
        She said, ‘I hope I shall not be left to kill myself, but It would be no more sin to kill me, than to put a block on the fire.’
      • 2012, Ron Herrett, Shorty’s Story
        Dawn and Shorty would cut this tree into blocks, while Randy and Matt went back for more. Dawn and Shorty made a good team on the crosscut, so when another log arrived, the first was almost completely made into shake wood.
    7. A set of sheets (of paper) joined together at one end, forming a cuboid shape.
      a block of 100 tickets
    8. (falconry) The perch on which a bird of prey is kept.
  2. A physical area or extent of something, often rectangular or approximately rectangular.
    a block of text, a block of colour, a block of land
    1. (philately) A joined group of four (or in some cases nine) postage stamps, forming a roughly square shape.
    2. (viticulture) A discrete group of vines in a vineyard, often distinguished from others by variety, clone, canopy training method, irrigation infrastructure, or some combination thereof.
  3. A logical extent or region; a grouping or apportionment of like things treated together as a unit.
    a block of data, a block of seven days, a block reservation
    1. (computing) A logical data storage unit containing one or more physical sectors (see cluster).
    2. (programming) A region of code in a program that acts as a single unit, such as a function or loop.
    3. (cryptography) A fixed-length group of bits making up part of a message.
    4. (chemistry) A portion of a macromolecule, comprising many units, that has at least one feature not present in adjacent portions.
    5. (rail transport) A section of a railroad where the block system is used.
    6. (computing) A contiguous range of Unicode code points used to encode characters of a specific type; can be of any size evenly divisible by 16, up to 65,536 (a full plane).
  4. A contiguous group of urban lots of property, typically several acres in extent, not crossed by public streets.
    I’m going for a walk around the block.
    1. The distance from one street to another in a city or suburb that is built (approximately) to a grid pattern.
      The place you are looking for is two long blocks east and one short block north.
  5. A roughly cuboid building.
    a block of flats, a tower block, an office block, a toilet block, a shower block
    1. A cellblock.
  6. Something that prevents something from passing.
    Synonyms: barrier, blockage, obstruction
    There’s a block in the pipe that means the water can’t get through.
    1. Interference or obstruction of cognitive processes.
      a mental block
      writer’s block
    2. (sports) An action to interfere with the movement of an opposing player or of the object of play (ball, puck).
      1. (cricket) A shot played by holding the bat vertically in the path of the ball, so that it loses momentum and drops to the ground.
      2. (cricket) The position of a player or bat when guarding the wicket.
      3. (cricket) A blockhole.
      4. (cricket) The popping crease.
      5. (volleyball) A defensive play by one or more players meant to deflect a spiked ball back to the hitter’s court.
      Synonyms: stuff, roof, wall
    3. A temporary or permanent ban that prevents access to an online account or service, or connection to or from a designated telephone number, IP address, or similar.
  7. (slang) The human head.
    I’ll knock your block off!
  8. (Britain) Solitary confinement.
  9. (obsolete) A blockhead; a stupid fellow; a dolt.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:head
  • city block
Related terms
  • bloc
Derived terms
Descendants
Translations

Verb

block (third-person singular simple present blocks, present participle blocking, simple past and past participle blocked)

  1. (transitive) To fill or obstruct (something) so that it is not possible to pass.
    The pipe was blocked by leaves.
  2. (transitive) To prevent (something or someone) from passing.
    A broken-down car is blocking the traffic.
  3. (transitive) To prevent (something from happening or someone from doing something).
    His plan to take over the business was blocked by the boss.
  4. (transitive, sports) To impede (an opponent or opponent’s play).
    He blocked the basketball player’s shot.
    The offensive linemen tried to block the blitz.
  5. (transitive, theater) To specify the positions and movements of the actors for (a section of a play or film).
    It was very difficult to block this scene convincingly.
  6. (transitive, cricket) To hit with a block.
  7. (intransitive, cricket) To play a block shot.
  8. (transitive) To bar (someone undesirable) from connecting via telephone, instant messaging, etc., or from accessing an online account or service, or similar.
    I tried to send you a message, but you’ve blocked me!
  9. (transitive) To bar (a message or communication), or bar connection with (an online account or service, a designated telephone number, IP address, etc.).
  10. (programming, intransitive) To wait for some condition to become true.
    When the condition expression is false, the thread blocks on the condition variable.
    • 2014, Richard Blewett, ‎Andrew Clymer, Pro Asynchronous Programming with .NET (page 25)
      Post is a “fire and forget” where the UI thread work is performed asynchronously; Send is synchronous in that the call blocks until the UI thread work has been performed.
  11. (transitive) To stretch or mould (a knitted item, a hat, etc.) into the desired shape.
    I blocked the mittens by wetting them and pinning them to a shaped piece of cardboard.
  12. (transitive) To shape or sketch out roughly.
    When drawing a scene, first block the main features, and then fill in the detail.
  13. (transitive, slang, obsolete) To knock (a person’s hat) down over their eyes.
    Synonym: bonnet
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

block

  1. Misspelling of bloc.

Manx

Etymology

Borrowed from English block.

Noun

block m (genitive singular bluick)

  1. block, log, cake (of soap)

Derived terms

  • block-lettyr

Mutation


Spanish

Etymology

From English block. Doublet of bloc and bloque.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈblok/, [ˈblok]

Noun

block m (plural blocks)

  1. (Guatemala) cement block
    Synonym: bloque de cemento

Swedish

Etymology

From Middle Low German block, from Old Saxon blok, from Proto-West Germanic *blokk, from Proto-Germanic *blukką.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈblɔk/

Noun

block n

  1. a block, a boulder, a cuboid (of ice, wood, rock)
  2. a block, a pad, a notebook
  3. a block, a pulley
  4. a block, a piece of data storage
  5. a bloc (of voters or countries)

Declension

Related terms

  • anteckningsblock
  • blädderblock
  • blockad
  • blockbaserad
  • blockera
  • blockstorlek
  • diskblock
  • flyttblock
  • isblock
  • skrivblock
  • stenblock


English

Etymology

From Middle English stuffen (to equip, furnish), borrowed from Old French estoffer, estofer (to provide what is necessary, equip, stuff), borrowed from Old High German stoffōn, from Proto-West Germanic *stoppōn (to clog up, block, fill). More at stop.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stʌf/
  • Rhymes: -ʌf

Noun

stuff (usually uncountable, plural stuffs)

  1. (informal) Miscellaneous items or objects; (with possessive) personal effects.
    • The Bat—they called him the Bat. []. He’d never been in stir, the bulls had never mugged him, he didn’t run with a mob, he played a lone hand, and fenced his stuff so that even the fence couldn’t swear he knew his face.
    1. (obsolete, uncountable) Furniture; goods; domestic vessels or utensils.
      • 1630, John Hayward, The Life and Raigne of King Edward VI,
        He took away locks, and gave away the king’s stuff.
  2. (informal) Unspecified things or matters.
  3. The tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object — as for example breadstuff into bread, or (more figuratively) the right stuff into an astronaut.
    Synonyms: matter, ingredients, constituents; see also Thesaurus:substance
    • 1697, John Davies, A Poem on the Immortality of the Soul
      The workman on his stuff his skill doth show, / And yet the stuff gives not the man his skill.
    1. (archaic) A material for making clothing; any woven textile, but especially a woollen fabric.
      • 1857, The National Magazine (volumes 10-11, page 350)
        “And you can buy a dress for your wife off this piece of stuff,” said Lisetta, who had always an eye to business.
      • 1992, Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety, Harper Perennial 2007, p.147:
        She was going out to buy some lengths of good woollen stuff for Louise’s winter dresses.
    2. (archaic) Boards used for building.
    3. Abstract/figurative substance or character.
      • c.1599, William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, Act 3, scene 2, 91–94:
        When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept; / Ambition should be made of sterner stuff
      • c.1610, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act 4, scene 1, 156–157:
        We are such stuff / As dreams are made on
    4. Paper stock ground ready for use. When partly ground, it is called half stuff.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  4. (informal) Used as placeholder, usually for material of unknown type or name.
    Synonyms: doodad, thingamabob; see also Thesaurus:thingy
  5. (slang) Narcotic drugs, especially heroin.
    Synonyms: dope, gear; see also Thesaurus:recreational drug
    • 1947, William Burroughs, letter, 11 March:
      For some idiotic reason the bureaucrats are more opposed to tea than to stuff.
    • 1975, Mary Sanches, Ben G. Blount, Sociocultural Dimensions of Language Use (page 47)
      For example, one addict would crack shorts (break and enter cars) and usually obtain just enough stolen goods to buy stuff and get off just before getting sick.
  6. (obsolete) A medicine or mixture; a potion.
  7. (sometimes euphemistic) Refuse or worthless matter; hence, also, foolish or irrational language; nonsense; trash.
    Synonyms: garbage, rubbish; see also Thesaurus:trash
    • Anger would indite / Such woeful stuff as I or Shadwell write.
  8. (nautical) A melted mass of turpentine, tallow, etc., with which the masts, sides, and bottom of a ship are smeared for lubrication.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ham. Nav. Encyc to this entry?)
  9. (slang, criminal argot, dated) Money.

Usage notes

  • The textile sense is increasingly specialized and sounds dated in everyday contexts. In the UK & Commonwealth it designates the cloth from which legal and academic gowns are made, except for the gowns of Queen’s/King’s/State Counsel, which are (often in contradistinction) made of silk.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

stuff (third-person singular simple present stuffs, present participle stuffing, simple past and past participle stuffed)

  1. (transitive) To fill by packing or crowding something into; to cram with something; to load to excess.
    I’m going to stuff this pillow with feathers.
    • Lest the gods, for sin, / Should with a swelling dropsy stuff thy skin.
  2. (transitive) To fill a space with (something) in a compressed manner.
    • 1922, Margery Williams, The Velveteen Rabbit
      The Rabbit could not claim to be a model of anything, for he didn’t know that real rabbits existed; he thought they were all stuffed with sawdust like himself, and he understood that sawdust was quite out-of-date and should never be mentioned in modern circles.
  3. (Should we delete(+) this redundant sense?) (transitive, cooking) To fill with seasoning.
  4. (transitive) To load goods into (a container) for transport.
  5. (transitive, used in the passive) To sate.
  6. (takes a reflexive pronoun) To eat, especially in a hearty or greedy manner.
    Synonyms: fill one’s face, feed one’s face, stuff one’s face
    She sits on the sofa all day, watching TV and stuffing herself with cream buns.
  7. (transitive, Britain, Australia, New Zealand) To break; to destroy.
  8. (transitive, vulgar, Britain, Australia, New Zealand) To sexually penetrate.
    Synonyms: fuck, root, screw
    His wife came home early and found him on the couch stuffing the maid.
  9. (transitive, mildly vulgar, often imperative) Used to contemptuously dismiss or reject something. See also stuff it.
  10. (informal) To heavily defeat or get the better of.
    Mudchester Rovers were stuffed 7-0 in the semi-final.
    They totally stuffed us in that business deal.
  11. (transitive) To cut off another competitor in a race by disturbing his projected and committed racing line (trajectory) by an abrupt manoeuvre.
  12. To preserve a dead bird or other animal by filling its skin.
  13. (transitive) To obstruct, as any of the organs; to affect with some obstruction in the organs of sense or respiration.
  14. (Should we delete(+) this redundant sense?) (transitive) To form or fashion by packing with the necessary material.
    • 1724, Jonathan Swift, Drapier’s Letters, 5
      An Eastern king put a judge to death for an iniquitous sentence, and ordered his hide to be stuffed into a cushion, and placed upon the tribunal.
  15. (transitive, dated) To crowd with facts; to cram the mind of; sometimes, to crowd or fill with false or idle tales or fancies.
  16. (transitive, computing) To compress (a file or files) in the StuffIt format, to be unstuffed later.

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • stuff at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • stuff in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Tuffs, tuffs

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial