blot vs daub what difference

what is difference between blot and daub

English

Etymology

From Middle English blot (blot, spot, stain, blemish). Perhaps from Old Norse *blettr (blot, stain) (only attested in documents from after Old Norse transitioned to Icelandic blettur), or from Old French bloche (clod of earth).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /blɒt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt
  • (General American) IPA(key): /blɑt/

Noun

blot (plural blots)

  1. A blemish, spot or stain made by a coloured substance.
    • 1711, Jonathan Swift, An Excellent New Song
      I withdrew my subscription by help of a blot, / And so might discover or gain by the plot:
    • 1918, Siegfried Sassoon, “The Death-Bed” in The Old Huntsman and Other Poems, London: Heinemann, p. 95,[1]
      [] He was blind; he could not see the stars
      Glinting among the wraiths of wandering cloud;
      Queer blots of colour, purple, scarlet, green,
      Flickered and faded in his drowning eyes.
  2. (by extension) A stain on someone’s reputation or character; a disgrace.
  3. (biochemistry) A method of transferring proteins, DNA or RNA, onto a carrier.
  4. (backgammon) An exposed piece in backgammon.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

blot (third-person singular simple present blots, present participle blotting, simple past and past participle blotted)

  1. (transitive) to cause a blot (on something) by spilling a coloured substance.
  2. (intransitive) to soak up or absorb liquid.
    This paper blots easily.
  3. (transitive) To dry (writing, etc.) with blotting paper.
  4. (transitive) To spot, stain, or bespatter, as with ink.
    • 1566, George Gascoigne, Dan Bartholmew of Bath
      The briefe was writte and blotted all with gore, []
  5. (transitive) To impair; to damage; to mar; to soil.
  6. (transitive) To stain with infamy; to disgrace.
    • 1707, Nicholas Rowe, The Royal Convert
      Blot not thy Innocence with guiltleſs Blood.
  7. (transitive) To obliterate, as writing with ink; to cancel; to efface; generally with out.
    to blot out a word or a sentence
  8. (transitive) To obscure; to eclipse; to shadow.
    • 1656, Abraham Cowley, Davideis
      He ſung how Earth blots the Moons gilded Wane, []

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Bolt, bolt

Danish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Middle Low German blōt (bare), from Proto-Germanic *blautaz (void, emaciated, soft), cognate with German bloß (bare) and Danish blød (soft).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥lʌd̥]

Adjective

blot (plural and definite singular attributive blotte)

  1. (dated) mere, very

Adverb

blot

  1. (slightly formal) only, merely
Synonyms
  • kun, bare

Etymology 2

Borrowed Old Norse blót, from Proto-Germanic *blōtą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥loˀd̥]

Noun

blot

  1. a sacrifice (especially a blood sacrifice by heathens)

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥lʌd̥]

Verb

blot

  1. imperative of blotte

Etymology 4

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥loˀd̥]

Verb

blot

  1. imperative of blote

Low German

Etymology

From Middle Low German blōt (bare), from Proto-Germanic *blautaz (void, emaciated, soft), cognate with German bloß (bare) and Danish blød (soft). Spelling variant of bloot.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbloʊ̯t]

Adverb

blot

  1. only, merely
Synonyms
  • blots, man

References

  • Der neue SASS: Plattdeutsches Wörterbuch, Plattdeutsch – Hochdeutsch, Hochdeutsch – Plattdeutsch. Plattdeutsche Rechtschreibung, sixth revised edition (2011, →ISBN, Wachholtz Verlag, Neumünster)

Luxembourgish

Adjective

blot

  1. neuter nominative of blo
  2. neuter accusative of blo

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *blōtą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bloːt/

Noun

blōt n

  1. a sacrifice, especially a blood sacrifice by heathens


English

Etymology

From Middle English daub (noun), from Middle English dauben (to plaster or whitewash; cover with clay; bespatter, verb), from Old Northern French dauber (to whitewash; plaster), of uncertain origin. Probably from Latin dealbāre (to whiten thoroughly).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɔːb/
  • (US) IPA(key): /dɔb/, /dɑb/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːb

Noun

daub (countable and uncountable, plural daubs)

  1. Excrement or clay used as a bonding material in construction.
  2. A soft coating of mud, plaster, etc.
  3. A crude or amateurish painting.
    • 2008, Joseph Agassi, ‎Ian Charles Jarvie, A Critical Rationalist Aesthetics (page 16)
      Ah, but what if he penned what in the art schools they call an ‘artist’s statement’ wherein he explained the relation of his gibberish or his daubs to the mainstream of art or writing?

Derived terms

  • wattle and daub

Related terms

  • (dab): dab, pat, splat

Translations

Verb

daub (third-person singular simple present daubs, present participle daubing, simple past and past participle daubed)

  1. (intransitive, transitive) To apply (something) to a surface in hasty or crude strokes.
    Synonyms: apply, coat, cover, plaster, smear
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Exodus 2.3,[1]
      [] she took for him an ark of bulrushes, and daubed it with slime and with pitch []
    • 1865, Elizabeth Gaskell, Wives and Daughters, Chapter 16,[2]
      [] Mrs. Gibson could not well come up to the girl’s bedroom every night and see that she daubed her face and neck over with the cosmetics so carefully provided for her.
    • 1869, Louisa May Alcott, Little Women, Chapter 26,[3]
      An artist friend fitted her out with his castoff palettes, brushes, and colors, and she daubed away, producing pastoral and marine views such as were never seen on land or sea.
    • 1940, Ernest Hemingway, For Whom the Bell Tolls, London: Jonathan Cape, Chapter 15, p. 185,[4]
      [] as he watched, [the motorcar] came up the snow-covered road, green and brown painted, in broken patches of daubed color, the windows blued over so that you could not see in []
    • 1952, Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt, Norton, 2004, Chapter 3, p. 39,[5]
      Blood was running to her shoe, and her stocking was torn in a jagged hole. [] she wet toilet paper and daubed until the red was gone from her stocking, but the red kept coming.
    • 1969, Chaim Potok, The Promise, New York: Fawcett Crest, Book 3, Chapter 16, p. 379,[6]
      They were expecting to see me, she said, daubing paint on the canvas and stepping back to gauge the effect.
    • 2007, Tan Twan Eng, The Gift of Rain, New York: Weinstein Books, Book 1, Chapter 21, p. 226,[7]
      Cylindrical lanterns daubed in red writing hung at intervals across wooden beams []
  2. (transitive) To paint (a picture, etc.) in a coarse or unskilful manner.
    • 1695, John Dryden (translator), Observations on the Art of Painting by Charles Alphonse du Fresnoy, London: W. Rogers, p. 201,[8]
      [] a lame, imperfect Piece, rudely daub’d over with too little Reflection and too much haste.
    • 1724, Isaac Watts, Logick: Or, The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry after Truth, London: John Clark and Richard Hett, 2nd edition, Part 2, Chapter 3, Section 1, p. 189,[9]
      If a Picture is daub’d with many bright and glaring Colours, the vulgar Eye admires it as an excellent Piece []
    • 1826, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, An Essay on Mind, Book I, in The Earlier Poems of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, 1826-1833, London: Bartholomew Robson, 1878, pp. 25-26,[10]
      If some gay picture, vilely daubed, were seen
      With grass of azure, and a sky of green,
      Th’impatient laughter we’d suppress in vain,
      And deem the painter jesting, or insane.
    • 1964, Christopher Isherwood, A Single Man, Vintage, 2010,
      [] this stretch of the shore is still filthy with trash; high-school gangs still daub huge scandalous words on its beach-wall, and seashells are still less easy to find here than discarded rubbers.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To cover with a specious or deceitful exterior; to disguise; to conceal.
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, Richard III, Act III, Scene 5,[11]
      So smooth he daub’d his vice with show of virtue,
    • 1820, John Clare, “The Universal Epitaph” in Poems Descriptive of Rural Life and Scenery, London: Taylor & Hessey, p. 91,[12]
      No flattering praises daub my stone,
      My frailties and my faults to hide;
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To flatter excessively or grossly.
    • 1766, Tobias Smollett, Travels through France and Italy, London: R. Baldwin, Volume 2, Letter 28, p. 73,[13]
      I can safely say, however, that without any daubing at all, I am, very sincerely, Your very affectionate, humble servant,
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To put on without taste; to deck gaudily.
    • 1697, John Dryden, “On the Three Dukes killing the Beadle on Sunday Morning, Febr. the 26th, 1670/1” in John Denham et al., Poems on affairs of state from the time of Oliver Cromwell, to the abdication of K. James the Second, London, p. 148,[14]
      Yet shall Whitehall the Innocent, the Good,
      See these men dance all daub’d with Lace and Blood.
    • 1762, Oliver Goldsmith, The Citizen of the World, London, for the author, Volume 1, Letter 50, p. 224,[15]
      [] whenever they came in order to pay those islanders a visit, [they] were generally very well dressed, and very poor, daubed with lace, but all the gilding on the outside.

Derived terms

  • dauber (unskilled painter)

Translations

See also

  • dab

Further reading

  • daub on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Buda, Duba, abud, baud

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