blot vs slur what difference

what is difference between blot and slur

English

Etymology

From Middle English blot (blot, spot, stain, blemish). Perhaps from Old Norse *blettr (blot, stain) (only attested in documents from after Old Norse transitioned to Icelandic blettur), or from Old French bloche (clod of earth).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /blɒt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt
  • (General American) IPA(key): /blɑt/

Noun

blot (plural blots)

  1. A blemish, spot or stain made by a coloured substance.
    • 1711, Jonathan Swift, An Excellent New Song
      I withdrew my subscription by help of a blot, / And so might discover or gain by the plot:
    • 1918, Siegfried Sassoon, “The Death-Bed” in The Old Huntsman and Other Poems, London: Heinemann, p. 95,[1]
      [] He was blind; he could not see the stars
      Glinting among the wraiths of wandering cloud;
      Queer blots of colour, purple, scarlet, green,
      Flickered and faded in his drowning eyes.
  2. (by extension) A stain on someone’s reputation or character; a disgrace.
  3. (biochemistry) A method of transferring proteins, DNA or RNA, onto a carrier.
  4. (backgammon) An exposed piece in backgammon.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

blot (third-person singular simple present blots, present participle blotting, simple past and past participle blotted)

  1. (transitive) to cause a blot (on something) by spilling a coloured substance.
  2. (intransitive) to soak up or absorb liquid.
    This paper blots easily.
  3. (transitive) To dry (writing, etc.) with blotting paper.
  4. (transitive) To spot, stain, or bespatter, as with ink.
    • 1566, George Gascoigne, Dan Bartholmew of Bath
      The briefe was writte and blotted all with gore, []
  5. (transitive) To impair; to damage; to mar; to soil.
  6. (transitive) To stain with infamy; to disgrace.
    • 1707, Nicholas Rowe, The Royal Convert
      Blot not thy Innocence with guiltleſs Blood.
  7. (transitive) To obliterate, as writing with ink; to cancel; to efface; generally with out.
    to blot out a word or a sentence
  8. (transitive) To obscure; to eclipse; to shadow.
    • 1656, Abraham Cowley, Davideis
      He ſung how Earth blots the Moons gilded Wane, []

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Bolt, bolt

Danish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Middle Low German blōt (bare), from Proto-Germanic *blautaz (void, emaciated, soft), cognate with German bloß (bare) and Danish blød (soft).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥lʌd̥]

Adjective

blot (plural and definite singular attributive blotte)

  1. (dated) mere, very

Adverb

blot

  1. (slightly formal) only, merely
Synonyms
  • kun, bare

Etymology 2

Borrowed Old Norse blót, from Proto-Germanic *blōtą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥loˀd̥]

Noun

blot

  1. a sacrifice (especially a blood sacrifice by heathens)

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥lʌd̥]

Verb

blot

  1. imperative of blotte

Etymology 4

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥loˀd̥]

Verb

blot

  1. imperative of blote

Low German

Etymology

From Middle Low German blōt (bare), from Proto-Germanic *blautaz (void, emaciated, soft), cognate with German bloß (bare) and Danish blød (soft). Spelling variant of bloot.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbloʊ̯t]

Adverb

blot

  1. only, merely
Synonyms
  • blots, man

References

  • Der neue SASS: Plattdeutsches Wörterbuch, Plattdeutsch – Hochdeutsch, Hochdeutsch – Plattdeutsch. Plattdeutsche Rechtschreibung, sixth revised edition (2011, →ISBN, Wachholtz Verlag, Neumünster)

Luxembourgish

Adjective

blot

  1. neuter nominative of blo
  2. neuter accusative of blo

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *blōtą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bloːt/

Noun

blōt n

  1. a sacrifice, especially a blood sacrifice by heathens


English

Etymology

From Middle English sloor (thin or fluid mud). Cognate with Middle Low German sluren (to trail in mud). Also related to dialectal Norwegian sløra (to be careless, to scamp, dawdle), Danish sløre (to wobble, be loose) (especially for wheels); compare Old Norse slóðra (to drag oneself along).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /slɜː(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(r)

Noun

slur (plural slurs)

  1. An insult or slight.
  2. (music) A set of notes that are played legato, without separate articulation.
  3. (music) The symbol indicating a legato passage, written as an arc over the slurred notes (not to be confused with a tie).
    Coordinate term: tie
  4. (obsolete) A trick or deception.
  5. In knitting machines, a device for depressing the sinkers successively by passing over them.

Derived terms

  • f-slur

Translations

Verb

slur (third-person singular simple present slurs, present participle slurring, simple past and past participle slurred)

  1. To insult or slight.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, The Marriage of Geraint
      And how men slur him, saying all his force
      Is melted into mere effeminacy?
  2. To run together; to articulate poorly.
  3. (music) To play legato or without separate articulation; to connect (notes) smoothly.
    • 1817, Thomas Busby, A Dictionary of Music, Theoretical and Practical
      Notes , the stems of which are joined together by cross lines, as in united quavers , semiquavers , & c . or notes over the heads of which a curve is drawn, to signify that they are to be slurred
  4. To soil; to sully; to contaminate; to disgrace.
    • 1678, Ralph Cudworth, The True Intellectual System of the Universe
      they do not only impudently slur the gospel, according to the history and the letter, in making it no better than a romantical legend []
  5. To cover over; to disguise; to conceal; to pass over lightly or with little notice.
    • With periods, points, and tropes, he slurs his crimes.
  6. To cheat, as by sliding a die; to trick.
  7. (printing, dated) To blur or double, as an impression from type; to mackle.

Derived terms

  • slur over

Translations

Further reading

  • Slur (music) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • URLs, lurs

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