blot vs smirch what difference

what is difference between blot and smirch

English

Etymology

From Middle English blot (blot, spot, stain, blemish). Perhaps from Old Norse *blettr (blot, stain) (only attested in documents from after Old Norse transitioned to Icelandic blettur), or from Old French bloche (clod of earth).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /blɒt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt
  • (General American) IPA(key): /blɑt/

Noun

blot (plural blots)

  1. A blemish, spot or stain made by a coloured substance.
    • 1711, Jonathan Swift, An Excellent New Song
      I withdrew my subscription by help of a blot, / And so might discover or gain by the plot:
    • 1918, Siegfried Sassoon, “The Death-Bed” in The Old Huntsman and Other Poems, London: Heinemann, p. 95,[1]
      [] He was blind; he could not see the stars
      Glinting among the wraiths of wandering cloud;
      Queer blots of colour, purple, scarlet, green,
      Flickered and faded in his drowning eyes.
  2. (by extension) A stain on someone’s reputation or character; a disgrace.
  3. (biochemistry) A method of transferring proteins, DNA or RNA, onto a carrier.
  4. (backgammon) An exposed piece in backgammon.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

blot (third-person singular simple present blots, present participle blotting, simple past and past participle blotted)

  1. (transitive) to cause a blot (on something) by spilling a coloured substance.
  2. (intransitive) to soak up or absorb liquid.
    This paper blots easily.
  3. (transitive) To dry (writing, etc.) with blotting paper.
  4. (transitive) To spot, stain, or bespatter, as with ink.
    • 1566, George Gascoigne, Dan Bartholmew of Bath
      The briefe was writte and blotted all with gore, []
  5. (transitive) To impair; to damage; to mar; to soil.
  6. (transitive) To stain with infamy; to disgrace.
    • 1707, Nicholas Rowe, The Royal Convert
      Blot not thy Innocence with guiltleſs Blood.
  7. (transitive) To obliterate, as writing with ink; to cancel; to efface; generally with out.
    to blot out a word or a sentence
  8. (transitive) To obscure; to eclipse; to shadow.
    • 1656, Abraham Cowley, Davideis
      He ſung how Earth blots the Moons gilded Wane, []

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Bolt, bolt

Danish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Middle Low German blōt (bare), from Proto-Germanic *blautaz (void, emaciated, soft), cognate with German bloß (bare) and Danish blød (soft).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥lʌd̥]

Adjective

blot (plural and definite singular attributive blotte)

  1. (dated) mere, very

Adverb

blot

  1. (slightly formal) only, merely
Synonyms
  • kun, bare

Etymology 2

Borrowed Old Norse blót, from Proto-Germanic *blōtą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥loˀd̥]

Noun

blot

  1. a sacrifice (especially a blood sacrifice by heathens)

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥lʌd̥]

Verb

blot

  1. imperative of blotte

Etymology 4

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥loˀd̥]

Verb

blot

  1. imperative of blote

Low German

Etymology

From Middle Low German blōt (bare), from Proto-Germanic *blautaz (void, emaciated, soft), cognate with German bloß (bare) and Danish blød (soft). Spelling variant of bloot.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbloʊ̯t]

Adverb

blot

  1. only, merely
Synonyms
  • blots, man

References

  • Der neue SASS: Plattdeutsches Wörterbuch, Plattdeutsch – Hochdeutsch, Hochdeutsch – Plattdeutsch. Plattdeutsche Rechtschreibung, sixth revised edition (2011, →ISBN, Wachholtz Verlag, Neumünster)

Luxembourgish

Adjective

blot

  1. neuter nominative of blo
  2. neuter accusative of blo

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *blōtą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bloːt/

Noun

blōt n

  1. a sacrifice, especially a blood sacrifice by heathens


English

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)tʃ

Etymology 1

Attested since the 15th century; possibly from Old French esmorcher (to torture), from Latin morsus (bitten) or from Dutch smerig (“dirty, gross”)

Noun

smirch (countable and uncountable, plural smirches)

  1. Dirt, or a stain.
    • 1998, Michael Foss, People of the First Crusade, page 6, →ISBN.
      Too often, in the years between 800 and 1050, the everyday sun declined through the smirch of flame and smoke of a monastery or town robbed and burnt.
  2. (figuratively) A stain on somebody’s reputation.
    • 2008, W. E. B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk, page 33, →ISBN.
      there were some business transactions which savored of dangerous speculation, if not dishonesty; and around it all lay the smirch of the Freedmen’s Bank.

Verb

smirch (third-person singular simple present smirches, present participle smirching, simple past and past participle smirched)

  1. (transitive) To dirty; to make dirty.
    Synonyms: besmirch, soil
    • 1600, William Shakespeare, As You Like It, Act I Scene III, lines 101-04
      CELIA. I’ll put myself in poor and mean attire,
      And with a kind of umber smirch my face;
      The like do you; so shall we pass along,
      And never stir assailants.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To harm the reputation of; to smear or slander.
    Synonym: besmirch
Derived terms
  • besmirch
Translations

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “smirch”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Etymology 2

Meld of smear and chirp

Noun

smirch (plural smirches)

  1. A chirp of radiation power from an astronomical body that has a smeared appearance on its plot in the time-frequency plane (usually associated with massive bodies orbiting supermassive black holes)
    • 2003, B. S. Sathyaprakash, BF Schutz, “Templates for stellar mass black holes falling into supermassive black holes”, Classical and Quantum Gravity, volume 20, no. 10
      The strain h(t) produced by a smirch in LISA is given by h(t) = −-A(t)cos[(t) + φ(t)]
    • 2005, John M. T. Thompson, Advances in Astronomy: From the Big Bang to the Solar System, page 133, →ISBN.
      By observing a smirch, LISA offers a unique opportunity to directly map the spacetime geometry around the central object and test whether or not this structure is in accordance with the expectations of general realtivity.

Anagrams

  • chirms, chrism

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