blot vs stain what difference

what is difference between blot and stain

English

Etymology

From Middle English blot (blot, spot, stain, blemish). Perhaps from Old Norse *blettr (blot, stain) (only attested in documents from after Old Norse transitioned to Icelandic blettur), or from Old French bloche (clod of earth).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /blɒt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt
  • (General American) IPA(key): /blɑt/

Noun

blot (plural blots)

  1. A blemish, spot or stain made by a coloured substance.
    • 1711, Jonathan Swift, An Excellent New Song
      I withdrew my subscription by help of a blot, / And so might discover or gain by the plot:
    • 1918, Siegfried Sassoon, “The Death-Bed” in The Old Huntsman and Other Poems, London: Heinemann, p. 95,[1]
      [] He was blind; he could not see the stars
      Glinting among the wraiths of wandering cloud;
      Queer blots of colour, purple, scarlet, green,
      Flickered and faded in his drowning eyes.
  2. (by extension) A stain on someone’s reputation or character; a disgrace.
  3. (biochemistry) A method of transferring proteins, DNA or RNA, onto a carrier.
  4. (backgammon) An exposed piece in backgammon.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

blot (third-person singular simple present blots, present participle blotting, simple past and past participle blotted)

  1. (transitive) to cause a blot (on something) by spilling a coloured substance.
  2. (intransitive) to soak up or absorb liquid.
    This paper blots easily.
  3. (transitive) To dry (writing, etc.) with blotting paper.
  4. (transitive) To spot, stain, or bespatter, as with ink.
    • 1566, George Gascoigne, Dan Bartholmew of Bath
      The briefe was writte and blotted all with gore, []
  5. (transitive) To impair; to damage; to mar; to soil.
  6. (transitive) To stain with infamy; to disgrace.
    • 1707, Nicholas Rowe, The Royal Convert
      Blot not thy Innocence with guiltleſs Blood.
  7. (transitive) To obliterate, as writing with ink; to cancel; to efface; generally with out.
    to blot out a word or a sentence
  8. (transitive) To obscure; to eclipse; to shadow.
    • 1656, Abraham Cowley, Davideis
      He ſung how Earth blots the Moons gilded Wane, []

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Bolt, bolt

Danish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Middle Low German blōt (bare), from Proto-Germanic *blautaz (void, emaciated, soft), cognate with German bloß (bare) and Danish blød (soft).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥lʌd̥]

Adjective

blot (plural and definite singular attributive blotte)

  1. (dated) mere, very

Adverb

blot

  1. (slightly formal) only, merely
Synonyms
  • kun, bare

Etymology 2

Borrowed Old Norse blót, from Proto-Germanic *blōtą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥loˀd̥]

Noun

blot

  1. a sacrifice (especially a blood sacrifice by heathens)

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥lʌd̥]

Verb

blot

  1. imperative of blotte

Etymology 4

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥loˀd̥]

Verb

blot

  1. imperative of blote

Low German

Etymology

From Middle Low German blōt (bare), from Proto-Germanic *blautaz (void, emaciated, soft), cognate with German bloß (bare) and Danish blød (soft). Spelling variant of bloot.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbloʊ̯t]

Adverb

blot

  1. only, merely
Synonyms
  • blots, man

References

  • Der neue SASS: Plattdeutsches Wörterbuch, Plattdeutsch – Hochdeutsch, Hochdeutsch – Plattdeutsch. Plattdeutsche Rechtschreibung, sixth revised edition (2011, →ISBN, Wachholtz Verlag, Neumünster)

Luxembourgish

Adjective

blot

  1. neuter nominative of blo
  2. neuter accusative of blo

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *blōtą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bloːt/

Noun

blōt n

  1. a sacrifice, especially a blood sacrifice by heathens


English

Etymology

From Middle English steinen, steynen (to stain, colour, paint), of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse steina (to stain, colour, paint), from steinn (stone, mineral blue, colour, stain), from Proto-Norse ᛊᛏᚨᛁᚾᚨᛉ (stainaz), from Proto-Germanic *stainaz (stone), from Proto-Indo-European *steyh₂- (to stiffen). Cognate with Old English stān (stone). More at stone.

Replaced native Middle English wem (spot, blemish, stain) from Old English wem (spot, stain).

In some senses, influenced by unrelated Middle English disteynen (to discolor, remove the colour from”; literally, “de-colour), from Anglo-Norman desteindre (to remove the colour from, bleach), from Old French destaindre (to remove the color from, bleach), from des- (dis-, de-, un-) + teindre (to dye), from Latin tingo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /steɪn/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn

Noun

stain (plural stains)

  1. A discoloured spot or area.
  2. A blemish on one’s character or reputation.
  3. A substance used to soak into a surface and colour it.
  4. A reagent or dye used to stain microscope specimens so as to make some structures visible.
  5. (heraldry) Any of a number of non-standard tinctures used in modern heraldry.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

stain (third-person singular simple present stains, present participle staining, simple past and past participle stained)

  1. (transitive) To discolour.
    to stain the hand with dye
    armour stained with blood
  2. To taint or tarnish someone’s character or reputation
  3. To coat a surface with a stain
    to stain wood with acids, coloured washes, paint rubbed in, etc.
    the stained glass used for church windows
  4. (intransitive) To become stained; to take a stain.
  5. (transitive, cytology) To treat (a microscopic specimen) with a dye, especially one that dyes specific features
  6. To cause to seem inferior or soiled by comparison.
    • She stains the ripest virgins of her age.
    • c. 1591-1592, Edmund Spenser, Daphnaïda. An Elegy upon the Death of the Noble and Vertuous Douglas Howard, Daughter and Heire of Henry Lord Howard, Viscount Byndon, and Wife of Arthure Gorges Esquier
      that did all other beasts in beauty stain

Translations

Anagrams

  • Astin, Insta, Saint, Santi, Sinta, Tanis, Tians, antis, insta-, saint, sat in, satin, stian, tians, tisan

Gothic

Romanization

stain

  1. Romanization of ????????????????????

Gutnish

Etymology

From Old Norse steinn (stone), from Proto-Norse ᛊᛏᚨᛁᚾᚨᛉ (stainaz), from Proto-Germanic *stainaz (stone). Cognate with English stone, German Stein, Dutch steen, Danish sten, Norwegian Bokmål sten, Norwegian Nynorsk stein, Swedish sten, Faroese steinur, West Frisian stien, Low German Steen. Ultimately from Pre-Germanic *stoyh₂nos, o-grade from Proto-Indo-European *steyh₂- (to stiffen).

Noun

stain m

  1. stone, rock, as material or individual piece of rock or pebble

Middle English

Adjective

stain

  1. Alternative form of stonen

Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse steinn (stone), from Proto-Norse ᛊᛏᚨᛁᚾᚨᛉ (stainaz), from Proto-Germanic *stainaz (stone). Cognate with English stone, German Stein, Dutch steen, Danish sten, Norwegian Bokmål sten, Norwegian Nynorsk stein, Swedish sten, Faroese steinur, West Frisian stien, Low German Steen. Ultimately from Pre-Germanic *stoyh₂nos, o-grade from Proto-Indo-European *steyh₂- (to stiffen).

Noun

stain m

  1. stone, rock, as material or individual piece of rock or pebble

Alternative forms

  • stäin
  • stejn

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