Blouse vs Shirt what difference

what is difference between Blouse and Shirt

English

Etymology 1

1828, from French blouse (a workman’s or peasant’s smock), see that for more.

More at blee, fold.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blaʊs/, /blaʊz/
  • Rhymes: -aʊs, -aʊz

Noun

blouse (plural blouses)

  1. (fashion, obsolete) A shirt, typically loose and reaching from the neck to the waist.
  2. (fashion) A shirt for women or girls, particularly a shirt with buttons and often a collar; a dress shirt tailored for women.
  3. (military fashion) A loose-fitting uniform jacket.
  4. (India) A short garment worn under a sari.
Synonyms
  • bodice (also used for undershirts)
Hyponyms
  • Watteau bodice
Derived terms
  • overblouse
  • underblouse
Descendants
  • Gujarati: બ્લાઉઝ (blāujha)
  • Japanese: ブラウス (burausu), ブルーズ (burūzu)
  • Korean: 블라우스 (beullauseu)
Translations

Verb

blouse (third-person singular simple present blouses, present participle blousing, simple past and past participle bloused)

  1. To hang a garment in loose folds.
  2. (military) To tuck one’s pants/trousers (into one’s boots).
    • 1989, Bernard C. Nalty, Strength for the Fight: A History of Black Americans in the Military, page 311
      An anonymous black soldier summed up his feelings by declaring, “If I fail to blouse my boots, or [if I] wear an Afro, I get socked. []
Antonyms
  • (military): unblouse
Derived terms
  • deblouse
  • unblouse

Etymology 2

Noun

blouse (plural blouses)

  1. Alternative form of blouze
  2. Alternative form of blowess
  3. Alternative form of blowze
Derived terms
  • blousy

Anagrams

  • Belous, Lobues, besoul, boules, obelus

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blus/
  • Hyphenation: blou‧se
  • Rhymes: -us

Noun

blouse f (plural blouses, diminutive blouseje n)

  1. Alternative spelling of bloes

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bluz/

Etymology 1

1788, of obscure origin. Three hypotheses are:

  • French blousse (scraps of wool), from Occitan lano blouso (pure or short wool), from blous, blos (pure, empty, bare), from Old High German blōz (naked, bare) (German bloß (bare))
  • A conflation of the aforementioned and French bliaud, bliaut (a kind of smock or robe, whence English bliaus, bliaut), from Old French bliau, also from Frankish *blīfald (topcoat of scarlet colour), from *blīu (coloured, bright) + *fald (crease, fold). More at blee, fold, and bliaut.
  • From Medieval Latin pelusia, from Pelusium, a city of Upper Egypt, a clothing manufacturer during the Middle Ages.

Noun

blouse f (plural blouses)

  1. uniform or coat with buttons down the front
    blouse d’hôpital — hospital gown
Related terms
  • blousard
  • blouson
Descendants

Etymology 2

belouse is earlier. The word appears already in the early 17th century and its origin is unknown.

Alternative forms

  • belouse, belouzes

Noun

blouse f (plural blouses)

  1. (archaic) any one of the holes on a billiards table
Descendants
  • German: Blouse, Bluse
  • Russian: лу́за (lúza)

Etymology 3

Verb

blouse

  1. first-person singular present indicative of blouser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of blouser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of blouser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of blouser
  5. second-person singular imperative of blouser

Further reading

  • “blouse” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • boules

Norman

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

blouse f (plural blouses)

  1. (Jersey) smock

Synonyms

  • c’mînsole dé molleton


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ʃɜːt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ʃɝt/
  • (Indian English) IPA(key): /ʃəːʈ/, /ʃəːɾʈ/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)t

Etymology 1

From Middle English sherte, shurte, schirte, from Old English sċyrte (a short garment; skirt; kirtle), from Proto-West Germanic *skurtijā, from Proto-Germanic *skurtijǭ (a short garment, skirt, apron).

Cognate with Saterland Frisian Schoarte (apron), Dutch schort (apron), German Schürze (apron), Danish skjorte (shirt), Norwegian skjorte (shirt), Swedish skjorta (shirt), Faroese skjúrta (shirt), Icelandic skyrta (shirt).

English skirt is a parallel formation from Old Norse; which is a doublet of short, from the same ultimate source.

Noun

shirt (plural shirts)

  1. An article of clothing that is worn on the upper part of the body, and often has sleeves, either long or short, that cover the arms.
    • 1509, John Fisher, A Mornynge Remembraunce []
      She had her shertes & gyrdyls of heere.
    • Several persons in December had nothing over their shoulders but their shirts.
  2. An interior lining in a blast furnace.
  3. A member of the shirt-wearing team in a shirts and skins game.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English sherten, shirten (also shorten), from the noun (see above).

Verb

shirt (third-person singular simple present shirts, present participle shirting, simple past and past participle shirted)

  1. To cover or clothe with a shirt, or as if with a shirt.
    • 1691, King Arthur, by John Dryden, act II, scene I.
      Ah! for so many souls, as but this morn / Were clothed with flesh, and warm’d with vital blood / But naked now, or shirted just with air.

Anagrams

  • Hirst, Trish, riths

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English shirt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃʏrt/
  • Hyphenation: shirt
  • Rhymes: -ʏrt

Noun

shirt n (plural shirts, diminutive shirtje n)

  1. A T-shirt or other shirt, typically including undershirts.

Derived terms

  • T-shirt

Related terms

  • schort

Middle English

Noun

shirt

  1. Alternative form of sherte

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