blow vs drift what difference

what is difference between blow and drift

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bləʊ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /bloʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ

Etymology 1

From Middle English blowen, from Old English blāwan (to blow, breathe, inflate, sound), from Proto-West Germanic *blāan, from Proto-Germanic *blēaną (to blow) (compare German blähen), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleh₁- (to swell, blow up) (compare Latin flō (to blow) and Old Armenian բեղուն (bełun, fertile)).

Verb

blow (third-person singular simple present blows, present participle blowing, simple past blew, past participle blown)

  1. (intransitive) To produce an air current.
    • 1653, Izaak Walton, The Compleat Angler
      Hark how it rains and blows!
  2. (transitive) To propel by an air current (or, if under water, a water current), usually with the mouth.
  3. (intransitive) To be propelled by an air current.
  4. (transitive) To create or shape by blowing; as in to blow bubbles, to blow glass.
  5. (transitive) To force a current of air upon with the mouth, or by other means.
  6. (transitive) To clear of contents by forcing air through.
  7. (transitive) To cause to make sound by blowing, as a musical instrument.
  8. (intransitive) To make a sound as the result of being blown.
  9. (intransitive, of a cetacean) To exhale visibly through the spout the seawater which it has taken in while feeding.
  10. (intransitive) To explode.
  11. (transitive, with “up” or with prep phrase headed by “to”) To cause to explode, shatter, or be utterly destroyed.
  12. (transitive) To cause the sudden destruction of.
  13. (intransitive) To suddenly fail destructively.
  14. (intransitive) (used to express displeasure or frustration) Damn.
  15. (intransitive, slang, sometimes considered vulgar) To be very undesirable.
    Synonym: suck
  16. (transitive, slang) To recklessly squander.
  17. (transitive, vulgar) To fellate; to perform oral sex on (usually a man).
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:give head
  18. (transitive, slang) To leave, especially suddenly or in a hurry.
  19. (transitive) To make flyblown, to defile, especially with fly eggs.
  20. (obsolete) To spread by report; to publish; to disclose.
    • Through the court his courtesy was blown.
  21. (obsolete) To inflate, as with pride; to puff up.
  22. (intransitive) To breathe hard or quick; to pant; to puff.
  23. (transitive) To put out of breath; to cause to blow from fatigue.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)
  24. (dated) To talk loudly; boast; storm.
    • a. 1940, Mildred Haun, “Shin-Bone Rocks” in The Hawk’s Done Gone p. 218:
      He didn’t just set around and try to out sweettalk somebody; he got out and out-fit somebody. He wouldn’t be blowing when he told his boys how he fit for the woman he got.
    • 1969, Charles Ambrose McCarthy, The Great Molly Maguire Hoax (page 113)
      At the breaking edge with him and completely fed up with his everlasting bragging and blowing about his personal exploits, and desirous of putting him somewhere, anywhere, so they wouldn’t be continuously annoyed by him, []
    • 1976, David Toulmin, Blown Seed (page 148)
      Audie never liked him because he was further in with old Craig than he was, bragging and blowing about his work and the things he could do, while Audie sat quiet as a mouse listening to his blab.
  25. (slang, informal, African-American Vernacular) To sing.
  26. (Scientology, intransitive) To leave the Church of Scientology in an unauthorized manner.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

blow (plural blows)

  1. A strong wind.
  2. (informal) A chance to catch one’s breath.
  3. (uncountable, US, slang) Cocaine.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:cocaine
  4. (uncountable, Britain, slang) Cannabis.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:marijuana
  5. (uncountable, US Chicago Regional, slang) Heroin.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:heroin
  6. (informal, vulgar) A blowjob; fellatio
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:oral sex
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English blo, bloo, from Old English blāw (blue), from Proto-Germanic *blēwaz (blue, dark blue, grey, black), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlēw- (yellow, blond, grey). Cognate with Latin flavus (yellow). Doublet of blue.

Adjective

blow (comparative blower or more blow, superlative blowest or most blow)

  1. (now chiefly dialectal, Northern England) Blue.

Etymology 3

From Middle English blowe, blaw, northern variant of blēwe, from Proto-Germanic *blewwaną (to beat) (compare Old Norse blegði (wedge), German einbläuen, Middle Dutch blouwen). Related to block.

Noun

blow (plural blows)

  1. The act of striking or hitting.
    Synonyms: bace, strike, hit, punch
  2. A sudden or forcible act or effort; an assault.
    • 1838-1842′, Thomas Arnold, History of Rome
      A vigorous blow might win [Hanno’s camp].
  3. A damaging occurrence.
    Synonyms: disaster, calamity
  4. (Australia, shearing, historical) A cut made to a sheep’s fleece by a shearer using hand-shears.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English blowen, from Old English blōwan, from Proto-Germanic *blōaną (compare Dutch bloeien, German blühen), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleh₃- (compare Latin florēre (to bloom)).

Verb

blow (third-person singular simple present blows, present participle blowing, simple past blew, past participle blown)

  1. To blossom; to cause to bloom or blossom.
Derived terms
  • full-blown
Translations

Noun

blow (plural blows)

  1. A mass or display of flowers; a yield.
  2. A display of anything brilliant or bright.
  3. A bloom, state of flowering.
Related terms
  • ablow
  • elder-blow
Translations

Anagrams

  • bowl

Middle English

Verb

blow

  1. Alternative form of blowen (to blow)


English

Etymology

From Middle English drift, dryft (act of driving, drove, shower of rain or snow, impulse), from Old English *drift (drift), from Proto-Germanic *driftiz (drift), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰreybʰ- (to drive, push). Equivalent to drive +‎ -th; cognate with North Frisian drift (drift), Saterland Frisian Drift (current, flow, stream, drift), Dutch drift (drift, passion, urge), German Drift (drift) and Trift (drove, pasture), Swedish drift (impulse, instinct), Icelandic drift (drift, snow-drift).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: drĭft, IPA(key): /dɹɪft/
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Noun

drift (countable and uncountable, plural drifts)

  1. (physical) Movement; that which moves or is moved.
    1. Anything driven at random.
      • Some log perhaps upon the waters swam, a useless drift.
    2. A mass of matter which has been driven or forced onward together in a body, or thrown together in a heap, etc., especially by wind or water.
      • 1855, Elisha Kent Kane, Arctic explorations: The second Grinnell expedition in search of Sir John Franklin
        We [] got the brig a good bed in the rushing drift [of ice].
      • 2012, David L. Culp, The Layered Garden: Design Lessons for Year-Round Beauty from Brandywine Cottage, Timber Press, page 168:
        Many of these ground-layer plants were placed in naturalistic drifts to make it appear as if they were sowing themselves.
    3. The distance through which a current flows in a given time.
    4. A drove or flock, as of cattle, sheep, birds.
      • 1655, Thomas Fuller, The History of the University of Cambridge since the Conquest
        cattle coming over the bridge (with their great drifts doing much damage to the high ways)
    5. A collection of loose earth and rocks, or boulders, which have been distributed over large portions of the earth’s surface, especially in latitudes north of forty degrees, by the retreat of continental glaciers, such as that which buries former river valleys and creates young river valleys.
      • 1867, E. Andrews, “Observations on the Glacial Drift beneath the bed of Lake Michigan,” American Journal of Science and Arts, vol. 43, nos. 127-129, page 75:
        It is there seen that at a distance from the valleys of streams, the old glacial drift usually comes to the surface, and often rises into considerable eminences.
    6. Driftwood included in flotsam washed up onto the beach.
    7. (obsolete) A driving; a violent movement.
      • 1332, author unknown, King Alisaunder
        The dragon drew him [self] away with drift of his wings.
    8. Course or direction along which anything is driven; setting.
      • 1589, Richard Hakluyt The Principal Navigations
        Our drift was south.
    9. That which is driven, forced, or urged along.
  2. The act or motion of drifting; the force which impels or drives; an overpowering influence or impulse.
    • 1678, Robert South, Prevention of Sin an unvaluable Mercy, sermon preached at Christ-Church, Oxon on November 10, 1678
      A bad man, being under the drift of any passion, will follow the impulse of it till something interpose.
  3. A place (a ford) along a river where the water is shallow enough to permit crossing to the opposite side.
  4. The tendency of an act, argument, course of conduct, or the like; object aimed at or intended; intention; hence, also, import or meaning of a sentence or discourse; aim.
    • c. early 1700s, Joseph Addison, A Discourse on Ancient and Modern Learning
      He has made the drift of the whole poem a compliment on his country in general.
  5. (architecture) The horizontal thrust or pressure of an arch or vault upon the abutments.
  6. (handiwork) A tool.
    1. A slightly tapered tool of steel for enlarging or shaping a hole in metal, by being forced or driven into or through it; a broach.
    2. A tool used to pack down the composition contained in a rocket, or like firework.
    3. A tool used to insert or extract a removable pin made of metal or hardwood, for the purpose of aligning and/or securing two pieces of material together.
  7. A deviation from the line of fire, peculiar to obloid projectiles.
  8. (uncountable) Minor deviation of audio or video playback from its correct speed.
    • 1975, Broadcast Management/engineering (volume 11)
      Reference sync servo system — permits minimal time-base error, assuring minimum jitter and drift.
  9. (uncountable, film) The situation where a performer gradually and unintentionally moves from their proper location within the scene.
    • 1970, Michael Pate, The Film Actor: Acting for Motion Pictures and Television (page 64)
      There is another form of drift when playing in a scene with other actors.
  10. (mining) A passage driven or cut between shaft and shaft; a driftway; a small subterranean gallery; an adit or tunnel.
  11. (nautical) Movement.
    1. The angle which the line of a ship’s motion makes with the meridian, in drifting.
    2. The distance a vessel is carried off from her desired course by the wind, currents, or other causes.
    3. The place in a deep-waisted vessel where the sheer is raised and the rail is cut off, and usually terminated with a scroll, or driftpiece.
    4. The distance between the two blocks of a tackle.
    5. The difference between the size of a bolt and the hole into which it is driven, or between the circumference of a hoop and that of the mast on which it is to be driven.
  12. (cricket) A sideways movement of the ball through the air, when bowled by a spin bowler.
  13. Slow, cumulative change.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

drift (third-person singular simple present drifts, present participle drifting, simple past and past participle drifted)

  1. (intransitive) To move slowly, especially pushed by currents of water, air, etc.
  2. (intransitive) To move haphazardly without any destination.
  3. (intransitive) To deviate gently from the intended direction of travel.
  4. (transitive) To drive or carry, as currents do a floating body.
    • 1865-1866, John Henry Newman, Apologia Pro Vita Sua
      I was drifted back first to the ante – Nicene history , and then to the Church of Alexandria
  5. (transitive) To drive into heaps.
  6. (intransitive) To accumulate in heaps by the force of wind; to be driven into heaps.
  7. (mining, US) To make a drift; to examine a vein or ledge for the purpose of ascertaining the presence of metals or ores; to follow a vein; to prospect.
  8. (transitive, engineering) To enlarge or shape, as a hole, with a drift.
  9. (automotive) To oversteer a vehicle, causing loss of traction, while maintaining control from entry to exit of a corner. See Drifting (motorsport).

Derived terms

Translations

References


Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse drift, from Proto-Germanic *driftiz, cognate with Swedish drift, English drift, German Trift, Dutch drift. Derived form the verb *drībaną (to drive).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dreft/, [ˈd̥ʁæfd̥]

Noun

drift c (singular definite driften, plural indefinite drifter)

  1. (uncountable) operation, running (of a company, a service or a mashine)
  2. (uncountable) service (of public transport)
  3. (psychology) drive, urge, desire
  4. (uncountable) drift (slow movement in the water or the air)
  5. drove (driven animals)

Derived terms

References

  • “drift” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch drift, also dricht, from Old Dutch *drift, from Proto-West Germanic *drifti, from Proto-Germanic *driftiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /drɪft/
  • Hyphenation: drift
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Noun

drift f (plural driften)

  1. passion
  2. strong and sudden upwelling of anger: a fit
  3. urge, strong desire
  4. violent tendency
  5. flock (of sheep or oxen)
  6. deviation of direction caused by wind: drift
  7. path along which cattle are driven

Derived terms

  • driftig
  • geestdriftig
  • aandrift
  • geestdrift
  • sneeuwdrift
  • driftbui
  • driftkikker
  • driftsneeuw

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: drif

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /trɪft/

Noun

drift f (genitive singular driftar, nominative plural driftir)

  1. snowdrift

Declension

Synonyms

  • drífa

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse drift

Noun

drift f or m (definite singular drifta or driften, indefinite plural drifter, definite plural driftene)

  1. operation (av / of)

Derived terms

References

  • “drift” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse drift

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /drɪft/

Noun

drift f (definite singular drifta, indefinite plural drifter, definite plural driftene)

  1. operation (av / of)
  2. drift (being carred by currents)
  3. drive (motivation)

Derived terms

  • driftskostnad
  • driftsmessig
  • firehjulsdrift
  • gruvedrift

References

  • “drift” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse dript, from Proto-Germanic *driftiz.

Noun

drift c

  1. urge, instinct
  2. operation, management (singular only)

Declension

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