blow vs float what difference

what is difference between blow and float

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bləʊ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /bloʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ

Etymology 1

From Middle English blowen, from Old English blāwan (to blow, breathe, inflate, sound), from Proto-West Germanic *blāan, from Proto-Germanic *blēaną (to blow) (compare German blähen), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleh₁- (to swell, blow up) (compare Latin flō (to blow) and Old Armenian բեղուն (bełun, fertile)).

Verb

blow (third-person singular simple present blows, present participle blowing, simple past blew, past participle blown)

  1. (intransitive) To produce an air current.
    • 1653, Izaak Walton, The Compleat Angler
      Hark how it rains and blows!
  2. (transitive) To propel by an air current (or, if under water, a water current), usually with the mouth.
  3. (intransitive) To be propelled by an air current.
  4. (transitive) To create or shape by blowing; as in to blow bubbles, to blow glass.
  5. (transitive) To force a current of air upon with the mouth, or by other means.
  6. (transitive) To clear of contents by forcing air through.
  7. (transitive) To cause to make sound by blowing, as a musical instrument.
  8. (intransitive) To make a sound as the result of being blown.
  9. (intransitive, of a cetacean) To exhale visibly through the spout the seawater which it has taken in while feeding.
  10. (intransitive) To explode.
  11. (transitive, with “up” or with prep phrase headed by “to”) To cause to explode, shatter, or be utterly destroyed.
  12. (transitive) To cause the sudden destruction of.
  13. (intransitive) To suddenly fail destructively.
  14. (intransitive) (used to express displeasure or frustration) Damn.
  15. (intransitive, slang, sometimes considered vulgar) To be very undesirable.
    Synonym: suck
  16. (transitive, slang) To recklessly squander.
  17. (transitive, vulgar) To fellate; to perform oral sex on (usually a man).
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:give head
  18. (transitive, slang) To leave, especially suddenly or in a hurry.
  19. (transitive) To make flyblown, to defile, especially with fly eggs.
  20. (obsolete) To spread by report; to publish; to disclose.
    • Through the court his courtesy was blown.
  21. (obsolete) To inflate, as with pride; to puff up.
  22. (intransitive) To breathe hard or quick; to pant; to puff.
  23. (transitive) To put out of breath; to cause to blow from fatigue.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)
  24. (dated) To talk loudly; boast; storm.
    • a. 1940, Mildred Haun, “Shin-Bone Rocks” in The Hawk’s Done Gone p. 218:
      He didn’t just set around and try to out sweettalk somebody; he got out and out-fit somebody. He wouldn’t be blowing when he told his boys how he fit for the woman he got.
    • 1969, Charles Ambrose McCarthy, The Great Molly Maguire Hoax (page 113)
      At the breaking edge with him and completely fed up with his everlasting bragging and blowing about his personal exploits, and desirous of putting him somewhere, anywhere, so they wouldn’t be continuously annoyed by him, []
    • 1976, David Toulmin, Blown Seed (page 148)
      Audie never liked him because he was further in with old Craig than he was, bragging and blowing about his work and the things he could do, while Audie sat quiet as a mouse listening to his blab.
  25. (slang, informal, African-American Vernacular) To sing.
  26. (Scientology, intransitive) To leave the Church of Scientology in an unauthorized manner.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

blow (plural blows)

  1. A strong wind.
  2. (informal) A chance to catch one’s breath.
  3. (uncountable, US, slang) Cocaine.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:cocaine
  4. (uncountable, Britain, slang) Cannabis.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:marijuana
  5. (uncountable, US Chicago Regional, slang) Heroin.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:heroin
  6. (informal, vulgar) A blowjob; fellatio
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:oral sex
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English blo, bloo, from Old English blāw (blue), from Proto-Germanic *blēwaz (blue, dark blue, grey, black), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlēw- (yellow, blond, grey). Cognate with Latin flavus (yellow). Doublet of blue.

Adjective

blow (comparative blower or more blow, superlative blowest or most blow)

  1. (now chiefly dialectal, Northern England) Blue.

Etymology 3

From Middle English blowe, blaw, northern variant of blēwe, from Proto-Germanic *blewwaną (to beat) (compare Old Norse blegði (wedge), German einbläuen, Middle Dutch blouwen). Related to block.

Noun

blow (plural blows)

  1. The act of striking or hitting.
    Synonyms: bace, strike, hit, punch
  2. A sudden or forcible act or effort; an assault.
    • 1838-1842′, Thomas Arnold, History of Rome
      A vigorous blow might win [Hanno’s camp].
  3. A damaging occurrence.
    Synonyms: disaster, calamity
  4. (Australia, shearing, historical) A cut made to a sheep’s fleece by a shearer using hand-shears.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English blowen, from Old English blōwan, from Proto-Germanic *blōaną (compare Dutch bloeien, German blühen), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleh₃- (compare Latin florēre (to bloom)).

Verb

blow (third-person singular simple present blows, present participle blowing, simple past blew, past participle blown)

  1. To blossom; to cause to bloom or blossom.
Derived terms
  • full-blown
Translations

Noun

blow (plural blows)

  1. A mass or display of flowers; a yield.
  2. A display of anything brilliant or bright.
  3. A bloom, state of flowering.
Related terms
  • ablow
  • elder-blow
Translations

Anagrams

  • bowl

Middle English

Verb

blow

  1. Alternative form of blowen (to blow)


English

Etymology

From Middle English floten, from Old English flotian (to float), from Proto-West Germanic *flotōn, from Proto-Germanic *flutōną (to float), from Proto-Indo-European *plewd-, *plew- (to float, swim, fly). Cognate with Saterland Frisian flotje (to float), West Frisian flotsje (to float), Dutch vlotten (to float), Middle Low German vloten, vlotten (to float, swim), German flötzen, flößen (to float), Old Norse flota (to float, launch), Icelandic fljóta, Old English flēotan (to float, swim), Ancient Greek πλέω (pléō), Lithuanian plaukti, Russian пла́вать (plávatʹ), Latin plaustrum (wagon, cart). Compare flow, fleet.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fləʊt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /floʊt/
  • Rhymes: -əʊt

Verb

float (third-person singular simple present floats, present participle floating, simple past and past participle floated)

  1. (intransitive) Of an object or substance, to be supported by a liquid of greater density than the object so as that part of the object or substance remains above the surface.
  2. (transitive) To cause something to be suspended in a liquid of greater density.
  3. (intransitive) To be capable of floating.
  4. (intransitive) To move in a particular direction with the liquid in which one is floating
  5. (intransitive) To drift or wander aimlessly.
  6. (intransitive) To drift gently through the air.
  7. (intransitive) To move in a fluid manner.
  8. (intransitive, figuratively) To circulate.
  9. (intransitive, colloquial) (of an idea or scheme) To be viable.
  10. (transitive) To propose (an idea) for consideration.
  11. (intransitive) To automatically adjust a parameter as related parameters change.
  12. (intransitive, finance) (of currencies) To have an exchange value determined by the markets as opposed to by rule.
  13. (transitive, finance) To allow (the exchange value of a currency) to be determined by the markets.
  14. (transitive, colloquial) To extend a short-term loan to.
  15. (transitive, finance) To issue or sell shares in a company (or units in a trust) to members of the public, followed by listing on a stock exchange.
    • 2005 June 21, Dewi Cooke, The Age [1],
      He [Mario Moretti Polegato] floated the company on the Milan Stock Exchange last December and sold 29 per cent of its shares, mostly to American investors.
    • 2007, Jonathan Reuvid, Floating Your Company: The Essential Guide to Going Public.
    • 2011, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, SIPRI Yearbook 2011: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, footnote i, page 269,
      As a result of this reverse acquisition, Hurlingham changed its name to Manroy plc and floated shares on the Alternative Investment Market in London.
  16. (transitive) To spread plaster over (a surface), using the tool called a float.
    • 1932, The Bricklayer, Mason and Plasterer (volumes 35-37, page 35)
      This wire, nailed over the face of the old plaster will also reinforce any loose lath or plaster after the walls have set. Float the wall to the face of the lath first.
  17. (transitive) To use a float (rasp-like tool) upon.
  18. (transitive) To transport by float (vehicular trailer).
  19. (poker) To perform a float.
  20. (computing, transitive) To cause (an element within a document) to float above or beside others.
    • 2010, Andy Harris, HTML, XHTML and CSS All-In-One For Dummies (page 290)
      To get the footer acting right, you need to float it and clear it on both margins.

Derived terms

  • float someone’s boat
  • whatever floats your boat

Translations

Noun

float (plural floats)

  1. A buoyant device used to support something in water or another liquid.
  2. A mass of timber or boards fastened together, and conveyed down a stream by the current; a raft.
  3. A float board.
  4. A tool similar to a rasp, used in various trades.
  5. A sort of trowel used for finishing concrete surfaces or smoothing plaster.
  6. An elaborately decorated trailer or vehicle, intended for display in a parade or pageant.
  7. (Britain) A small vehicle used for local deliveries, especially in the term milk float.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 7
      As soon as the skies brightened and plum-blossom was out, Paul drove off in the milkman’s heavy float up to Willey Farm.
  8. (finance) Funds committed to be paid but not yet paid.
  9. (finance, Australia, and other Commonwealth countries?) An offering of shares in a company (or units in a trust) to members of the public, normally followed by a listing on a stock exchange.
  10. (banking) The total amount of checks/cheques or other drafts written against a bank account but not yet cleared and charged against the account.
  11. (insurance) Premiums taken in but not yet paid out.
  12. (programming) A floating-point number, especially one that has lower precision than a double.
    • 2011, Rubin H. Landau, A First Course in Scientific Computing (page 214)
      If you want to be a scientist or an engineer, learn to say “no” to singles and floats.
  13. A soft beverage with a scoop of ice-cream floating in it.
  14. A small sum of money put in a cashier’s till at the start of business to enable change to be made.
  15. (poker) A maneuver where a player calls on the flop or turn with a weak hand, with the intention of bluffing after a subsequent community card.
  16. (knitting) One of the loose ends of yarn on an unfinished work.
  17. (automotive) a car carrier or car transporter truck or truck-and-trailer combination
  18. (transport) a lowboy trailer
  19. (tempering) A device sending a copious stream of water to the heated surface of a bulky object, such as an anvil or die.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  20. (obsolete) The act of flowing; flux; flow.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  21. A quantity of earth, eighteen feet square and one foot deep.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Mortimer to this entry?)
  22. A polishing block used in marble working; a runner.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  23. (Britain, dated) A coal cart.
  24. A breakdancing move in which the body is held parallel to the floor while balancing on one or both hands.
  25. (computing) A visual style on a web page that causes the styled elements to float above or beside others.
    • 2007, Michael Bowers, Pro CSS and HTML Design Patterns (page 93)
      When a float cannot fit next to another float, it moves down below it. A float’s position, size, padding, borders, and margins affect the position of adjacent floats and adjacent inline content.

Synonyms

  • (Shares offered to the public:): initial public offering

Derived terms

  • floatplane

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • aloft, flota

Faroese

Noun

float ? (plural [please provide])

  1. fleet, navy

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