blow vs lay what difference

what is difference between blow and lay

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bləʊ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /bloʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ

Etymology 1

From Middle English blowen, from Old English blāwan (to blow, breathe, inflate, sound), from Proto-West Germanic *blāan, from Proto-Germanic *blēaną (to blow) (compare German blähen), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleh₁- (to swell, blow up) (compare Latin flō (to blow) and Old Armenian բեղուն (bełun, fertile)).

Verb

blow (third-person singular simple present blows, present participle blowing, simple past blew, past participle blown)

  1. (intransitive) To produce an air current.
    • 1653, Izaak Walton, The Compleat Angler
      Hark how it rains and blows!
  2. (transitive) To propel by an air current (or, if under water, a water current), usually with the mouth.
  3. (intransitive) To be propelled by an air current.
  4. (transitive) To create or shape by blowing; as in to blow bubbles, to blow glass.
  5. (transitive) To force a current of air upon with the mouth, or by other means.
  6. (transitive) To clear of contents by forcing air through.
  7. (transitive) To cause to make sound by blowing, as a musical instrument.
  8. (intransitive) To make a sound as the result of being blown.
  9. (intransitive, of a cetacean) To exhale visibly through the spout the seawater which it has taken in while feeding.
  10. (intransitive) To explode.
  11. (transitive, with “up” or with prep phrase headed by “to”) To cause to explode, shatter, or be utterly destroyed.
  12. (transitive) To cause the sudden destruction of.
  13. (intransitive) To suddenly fail destructively.
  14. (intransitive) (used to express displeasure or frustration) Damn.
  15. (intransitive, slang, sometimes considered vulgar) To be very undesirable.
    Synonym: suck
  16. (transitive, slang) To recklessly squander.
  17. (transitive, vulgar) To fellate; to perform oral sex on (usually a man).
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:give head
  18. (transitive, slang) To leave, especially suddenly or in a hurry.
  19. (transitive) To make flyblown, to defile, especially with fly eggs.
  20. (obsolete) To spread by report; to publish; to disclose.
    • Through the court his courtesy was blown.
  21. (obsolete) To inflate, as with pride; to puff up.
  22. (intransitive) To breathe hard or quick; to pant; to puff.
  23. (transitive) To put out of breath; to cause to blow from fatigue.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)
  24. (dated) To talk loudly; boast; storm.
    • a. 1940, Mildred Haun, “Shin-Bone Rocks” in The Hawk’s Done Gone p. 218:
      He didn’t just set around and try to out sweettalk somebody; he got out and out-fit somebody. He wouldn’t be blowing when he told his boys how he fit for the woman he got.
    • 1969, Charles Ambrose McCarthy, The Great Molly Maguire Hoax (page 113)
      At the breaking edge with him and completely fed up with his everlasting bragging and blowing about his personal exploits, and desirous of putting him somewhere, anywhere, so they wouldn’t be continuously annoyed by him, []
    • 1976, David Toulmin, Blown Seed (page 148)
      Audie never liked him because he was further in with old Craig than he was, bragging and blowing about his work and the things he could do, while Audie sat quiet as a mouse listening to his blab.
  25. (slang, informal, African-American Vernacular) To sing.
  26. (Scientology, intransitive) To leave the Church of Scientology in an unauthorized manner.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

blow (plural blows)

  1. A strong wind.
  2. (informal) A chance to catch one’s breath.
  3. (uncountable, US, slang) Cocaine.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:cocaine
  4. (uncountable, Britain, slang) Cannabis.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:marijuana
  5. (uncountable, US Chicago Regional, slang) Heroin.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:heroin
  6. (informal, vulgar) A blowjob; fellatio
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:oral sex
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English blo, bloo, from Old English blāw (blue), from Proto-Germanic *blēwaz (blue, dark blue, grey, black), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlēw- (yellow, blond, grey). Cognate with Latin flavus (yellow). Doublet of blue.

Adjective

blow (comparative blower or more blow, superlative blowest or most blow)

  1. (now chiefly dialectal, Northern England) Blue.

Etymology 3

From Middle English blowe, blaw, northern variant of blēwe, from Proto-Germanic *blewwaną (to beat) (compare Old Norse blegði (wedge), German einbläuen, Middle Dutch blouwen). Related to block.

Noun

blow (plural blows)

  1. The act of striking or hitting.
    Synonyms: bace, strike, hit, punch
  2. A sudden or forcible act or effort; an assault.
    • 1838-1842′, Thomas Arnold, History of Rome
      A vigorous blow might win [Hanno’s camp].
  3. A damaging occurrence.
    Synonyms: disaster, calamity
  4. (Australia, shearing, historical) A cut made to a sheep’s fleece by a shearer using hand-shears.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English blowen, from Old English blōwan, from Proto-Germanic *blōaną (compare Dutch bloeien, German blühen), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleh₃- (compare Latin florēre (to bloom)).

Verb

blow (third-person singular simple present blows, present participle blowing, simple past blew, past participle blown)

  1. To blossom; to cause to bloom or blossom.
Derived terms
  • full-blown
Translations

Noun

blow (plural blows)

  1. A mass or display of flowers; a yield.
  2. A display of anything brilliant or bright.
  3. A bloom, state of flowering.
Related terms
  • ablow
  • elder-blow
Translations

Anagrams

  • bowl

Middle English

Verb

blow

  1. Alternative form of blowen (to blow)


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: , IPA(key): /leɪ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪ
  • Homophones: lei, ley, le

Etymology 1

From Middle English leyen, leggen, from Old English leċġan (to lay), from Proto-West Germanic *laggjan, from Proto-Germanic *lagjaną (to lay), causative form of Proto-Germanic *ligjaną (to lie, recline), from Proto-Indo-European *legʰ- (to lie, recline).

Cognate with West Frisian lizze (to lay, to lie), Dutch leggen (to lay), German legen (to lay), Norwegian Bokmål legge (to lay), Norwegian Nynorsk leggja (to lay), Swedish lägga (to lay), Icelandic leggja (to lay), Albanian lag (troop, band, war encampment).

Verb

lay (third-person singular simple present lays, present participle laying, simple past and past participle laid)

  1. (transitive) To place down in a position of rest, or in a horizontal position.
    • An indulgent playmate, Grannie would lay aside the long scratchy-looking letter she was writing (heavily crossed ‘to save notepaper’) and enter into the delightful pastime of ‘a chicken from Mr Whiteley’s’.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To cause to subside or abate.
    Synonyms: becalm, settle down
  3. (transitive) To prepare (a plan, project etc.); to set out, establish (a law, principle).
  4. (transitive) To install certain building materials, laying one thing on top of another.
  5. (transitive) To produce and deposit an egg.
  6. (transitive) To bet (that something is or is not the case).
  7. (transitive) To deposit (a stake) as a wager; to stake; to risk.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      He laid a hundred guineas with the laird of Slofferfield that he would drive four horses through the Slofferfield loch, and in the prank he had his bit chariot dung to pieces and a good mare killed.
  8. (transitive, slang) To have sex with.
    Synonyms: lie by, lie with, sleep with; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
  9. (nautical) To take a position; to come or go.
  10. (law) To state; to allege.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bouvier to this entry?)
  11. (military) To point; to aim.
  12. (ropemaking) To put the strands of (a rope, a cable, etc.) in their proper places and twist or unite them.
  13. (printing) To place and arrange (pages) for a form upon the imposing stone.
  14. (printing) To place (new type) properly in the cases.
  15. To apply; to put.
  16. To impose (a burden, punishment, command, tax, etc.).
  17. To impute; to charge; to allege.
    Synonyms: ascribe, attribute
  18. To present or offer.
  19. (intransitive, proscribed, see usage notes) To lie: to rest in a horizontal position on a surface.
    I found him laying on the floor.
Conjugation
Usage notes
  • The verb lay is sometimes used instead of the corresponding intransitive verb lie in informal settings, especially but not exclusively in spoken language. Similarly, laid, the simple past and past participle of lay, may also replace lay and lain, respectively the simple past and past participle of lie.
  • This intransitive use dates to Middle English, first appearing in the thirteenth century but only becoming common in the fifteenth century. The usage was still chiefly limited to the present tense and it seems that it was influenced by reflexive or passive use of lay.
  • There are several factors that contribute to the loss of the distinction. One is that lay is used as both the base form of lay and as the simple past of lie, another is the use of lay as a reflexive verb meaning “to go lie (down)”. In any event, similar mergers exist in other Germanic languages; compare Afrikaans (to lie; to lay), where the two verbs have merged completely.
  • Traditional grammars, schoolbooks and style guides object to this intransitive use of lay and a certain stigma remains against the practice. Consequently the usage is common in speech but rarely found in edited writing or in more formal spoken situations.
  • Nautical use of lay as an intransitive verb is regarded as standard.
Derived terms
Translations

Further reading

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “lay”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.

Noun

lay (countable and uncountable, plural lays)

  1. Arrangement or relationship; layout.
    the lay of the land
  2. A share of the profits in a business.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 16
      I was already aware that in the whaling business they paid no wages; but all hands, including the captain, received certain shares of the profits called lays, and that these lays were proportioned to the degree of importance pertaining to the respective duties of the ship’s company.
  3. A lyrical, narrative poem written in octosyllabic couplets that often deals with tales of adventure and romance.
    • 1945: “The Lay of Aotrou and Itroun” by JRR Tolkien
      Sad is the note and sad the lay,
      but mirth we meet not every day.
  4. The direction a rope is twisted.
    Worm and parcel with the lay; turn and serve the other way.
  5. (colloquial) A casual sexual partner.
    • 1996, JoAnn Ross, Southern Comforts, MIRA (1996), →ISBN, page 166:
      Over the years she’d tried to tell himself that his uptown girl was just another lay.
    • 2000, R. J. Kaiser, Fruitcake, MIRA (2000), →ISBN, page 288:
      To find a place like that and be discreet about it, Jones figured he needed help, so he went to see his favorite lay, Juan Carillo’s woman, Carmen.
    • 2011, Kelly Meding, Trance, Pocket Books (2011), →ISBN, pages 205-206:
      “Because I don’t want William to be just another lay. I did the slut thing, T, and it got me into a lot of trouble years ago. []
    What was I, just another lay you can toss aside as you go on to your next conquest?
  6. (colloquial) An act of sexual intercourse.
    • 1993, David Halberstam, The Fifties, Open Road Integrated Media (2012), →ISBN, unnumbered page:
      Listening to this dismissal of his work, [Tennessee] Williams thought to himself of Wilder, “This character has never had a good lay.”
    • 2009, Fern Michaels, The Scoop, Kensington Books (2009), →ISBN, pages 212-213:
      [] She didn’t become this germ freak until Thomas died. I wonder if she just needs a good lay, you know, an all-nighter?” Toots said thoughtfully.
    • 2011, Pamela Yaye, Promises We Make, Kimani Press (2011), →ISBN, unnumbered page:
      “What she needs is a good lay. If she had someone to rock her world on a regular basis, she wouldn’t be such a raging bit—”
  7. (slang, archaic) (Can we verify(+) this sense?) A plan; a scheme.
    • I shall be on that lay nae mair
  8. The laying of eggs.
  9. (obsolete) A layer.
    • 1677, Hannah Woolley, The Compleat Servant-Maid, London: T. Passinger, p. 5,[1]
      [] lay in the bottom of an earthen pot some dried vine leaves, and so make a lay of Pears, and leaves till the pot is filled up, laying betwixt each lay some sliced Ginger []
    • 1718, Joseph Addison, Remarks on Several Parts of Italy, &c. in the Years 1701, 1702, 1703, London: J. Tonson, “Sienna, Leghorne, Pisa,” p. 300,[2]
      [] the whole Body of the Church is chequer’d with different Lays of White and Black Marble []
    • 1724, Thomas Spooner, A Compendious Treatise of the Diseases of the Skin, London, Chapter 2, p. 20,[3]
      [] when we examine the Scarf-Skin with a Microscope, it appears to be made up of several Lays of exceeding small Scales, which cover one another more or less []
    • 1766, Thomas Amory, The Life of John Buncle, Esq., London: J. Johnson and B. Davenport, Volume 2, Section 1, p. 16, footnote 1,[4]
      [] in one particular it exceeds the fen birds, for it has two tastes; it being brown and white meat: under a lay of brown is a lay of white meat []
  10. (obsolete) A basis or ground.
Synonyms
  • (casual sexual partner): see also Thesaurus:casual sexual partner.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English laie, lawe, from Old English lagu (sea, flood, water, ocean), from Proto-West Germanic *lagu (water, sea), from Proto-Germanic *laguz (water, sea), from Proto-Indo-European *lókus (water, body of water, lake). Cognate with Icelandic lögur (liquid, fluid, lake), Latin lacus (lake, hollow, hole).

Noun

lay (plural lays)

  1. A lake.

Etymology 3

From Middle English lay, from Old French lai, from Latin laicus, from Ancient Greek λαϊκός (laïkós). Doublet of laic.

Adjective

lay (comparative more lay, superlative most lay)

  1. Not belonging to the clergy, but associated with them.
    They seemed more lay than clerical.
    a lay preacher; a lay brother
  2. Non-professional; not being a member of an organized institution.
  3. (card games) Not trumps.
    a lay suit
  4. (obsolete) Not educated or cultivated; ignorant.
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 4

See lie.

Verb

lay

  1. simple past tense of lie when pertaining to position.
    The baby lay in its crib and slept silently.
  2. (proscribed) To be in a horizontal position; to lie (from confusion with lie).
    • 1969 July, Bob Dylan, “Lay Lady Lay”, Nashville Skyline, Columbia:
      Lay, lady, lay. / Lay across my big brass bed.
    • 1974, John Denver, “Annie’s Song”, Back Home Again, RCA:
      Let me lay down beside you. / Let me always be with you.
Derived terms
  • layabout

Etymology 5

From Middle English lay, from Old French lai (song, lyric, poem), from Frankish *laih (play, melody, song), from Proto-Germanic *laikaz, *laikiz (jump, play, dance, hymn), from Proto-Indo-European *leyg- (to jump, spring, play). Akin to Old High German leih (a play, skit, melody, song), Middle High German leich (piece of music, epic song played on a harp), Old English lācan (to move quickly, fence, sing). See lake.

Noun

lay (plural lays)

  1. A ballad or sung poem; a short poem or narrative, usually intended to be sung.
    • 1742, Edward Young, The Complaint: or Night-Thoughts on Life, Death & Immortality, Night I
      I strive, with wakeful melody, to cheer
      The sullen gloom, sweet Philomel! like thee,
      And call the stars to listen: every star
      Is deaf to mine, enamour’d of thy lay.
    • 1805 The Lay of the Last Minstrel, Sir Walter Scott.
Translations

Etymology 6

From Middle English lay, laye, laiȝe, leyȝe, from Old English lǣh, lēh, northern (Anglian) variants of Old English lēah (lea). More at lea.

Noun

lay (plural lays)

  1. (obsolete) A meadow; a lea.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)

Etymology 7

From Middle English laige, læȝe, variants of Middle English lawe (law). More at law.

Noun

lay (plural lays)

  1. (obsolete) A law.
  2. (obsolete) An obligation; a vow.
    • they bound themselues by a sacred lay and oth to fight it out to the last man

Etymology 8

Calque of Yiddish לייגן(leygn, to put, lay).

Verb

lay (third-person singular simple present lays, present participle laying, simple past and past participle laid)

  1. (Judaism, transitive) To don or put on (tefillin (phylacteries)).

References

Anagrams

  • Aly

Anguthimri

Verb

lay

  1. (transitive, Mpakwithi) to carry

References

  • Terry Crowley, The Mpakwithi dialect of Anguthimri (1981), page 186

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French l’ail (the garlic)

Noun

lay

  1. garlic

Lashi

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /laɪ̯/

Postposition

lay

  1. through
  2. across

Verb

lay

  1. to pass

References

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[5], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Malagasy

Etymology

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *layaʀ, from Proto-Austronesian *layaʀ.

Noun

lay

  1. sail (a piece of fabric attached to a boat)
  2. tent

References

  • lay in Malagasy dictionaries at malagasyword.org

Mauritian Creole

Etymology 1

From French ail

Noun

lay

  1. garlic

Etymology 2

From Malagasy ley (butterfly)

Noun

lay

  1. moth

References

  • Baker, Philip & Hookoomsing, Vinesh Y. 1987. Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

Middle English

Verb

lay

  1. Alternative form of leie: simple past of lien

Seychellois Creole

Etymology 1

From French ail

Noun

lay

  1. garlic

Etymology 2

From Malagasy ley (butterfly)

Noun

lay

  1. moth

References

  • Danielle D’Offay et Guy Lionnet, Diksyonner Kreol – Franse / Dictionnaire Créole Seychellois – Français

Vietnamese

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [laj˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [laj˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [la(ː)j˧˧]

Verb

lay

  1. to shake

Derived terms


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